The Decimal Clock


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If we had ten hours in a day, instead of 24, and if each of these hours had 100 minutes instead of 60, and if every minute had 100 seconds, our clocks would look like this, and the time would be …

Why do we have to restrict ourselves to the 60 minutes and 60 seconds as a construct for time? I would love to see a watch design based on 10-100-100 logic.

What’s Wrong Apple & Microsoft


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I am primarily a Mac household — I use my iMac Pro as a digital darkroom. I am not likely to give up my desktop (iMac Pro) anytime soon, and the reason is Photoshop. While I use Lightroom CC as my cloud library/repository — editing starts and ends with Photoshop. I have a streamlined, six step-process to edit my photos and I like the granularity of layers. I also love the flexibility of working with a cloud-library.

The iMac Pro is perfect for editing — it is fast and can handle six to eight layers I usually create for editing a photo. What does suck about the iMac is the mouse — and that is why I almost always default to Microsoft’s mice. In my opinion, Microsoft makes the best PC peripherals in business. They are so beautiful, ergonomic and just delightful to use. Their mice are well made and

RE2l5Q4

Continue reading “What’s Wrong Apple & Microsoft”

The Power of Distributed


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Talent is evenly distributed around the globe, but opportunity is not.

Nearly 15 years ago, I would often to young Matt about WordPress, the changing dynamics of media and how work will change. He taught me a lot about open source software. I talked about broadband, connectivity, and connectedness. In 2004, I wrote a piece called, Escape from Silicon Valley. In that story, I looked at how broadband was inspiring founders to go “broadband” instead of going west.

I had launched a blog called WebWorkerDaily, and like many of our initial efforts (NewTeeVee and Earth2Tech), it came a little too soon to the market. I believed that the Internet’s killer app would be work and if you look around today, many find work on the Internet. Others find the demand for their skills. And hundreds of millions use the Internet to get the job done.

Matt would eventually help kickstart Continue reading “The Power of Distributed”

The Power of Distributed


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Talent is evenly distributed around the globe, but opportunity is not.

Nearly 15 years ago, I would often talk to young Matt about many topics including WordPress, the changing dynamics of media and how work will change. He taught me a lot about open source software. I talked about broadband, connectivity, and connectedness. In 2004, I wrote a piece called, Escape from Silicon Valley. In that story, I looked at how broadband was inspiring founders to go “broadband” instead of going west.

I had launched a blog called WebWorkerDaily, and like many of our initial efforts (NewTeeVee and Earth2Tech), it came a little too soon to the market. I believed that the Internet’s killer app would be work and if you look around today, many find work on the Internet. Others find the demand for their skills. And hundreds of millions use the Internet to get the job done.

Matt Continue reading “The Power of Distributed”

Amazon UnPrimed


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Bloomberg noticed that Amazon’s retail growth is slowing, especially as brick-and-mortar merchants have stepped up their digital game. Even Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos acknowledged that in his latest shareholder letter. “It’s hard to explain the slowdown in Amazon’s merchandise sales growth,” Bloomberg wondered in their story. I don’t know about the larger macro reasons, but I have my story to share.

I have been a life long Prime customer, and am definitely happy to pay for the premium of getting whatever I want within 48 hour time frame. Prime Now is great. However, lately, I have started to order less and less from Amazon. Just as I have shifted most of my search away from Google, I am not sure I want Amazon to have complete control over my shopping habits. So instead, I am being more unfaithful to Bezos’ bodega.

Additionally, Amazon has lost its core value proposition — it Continue reading “Amazon UnPrimed”

The Away Experience


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After a decade of service, it is time for my good old 29-inch Rimowa suitcase to go in for a much needed retrofit. It will be a while before it comes back from Germany, and it will also set me back a pretty penny. I don’t mind paying the price to get another decade of use out of it.

The repairs made me wonder if I should get a new large check-in suitcase, one that can carry a lot more of my cold weather gear, and other non-camera but photography peripherals. The Rimowa trunk is pretty attractive, though the price is high enough to cause a nosebleed. Ever since LVMH bought the brand, the prices have crept up, and the lifetime warranty has gone the way of the dodo. And what’s more, the suitcases sold in the US are no longer made in Germany, and instead, are made in Canada.

AwayHayes 4

Continue reading “The Away Experience”

Dieter Rams on what really is a designer


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A designer who wants to achieve good design must not regard himself as an artist who, according to taste and aesthetics, is merely dressing-up products with a last-minute garment.

The designer must be the ‘gestaltingenieur’ or creative engineer. They synthesise the completed product from the various elements that make up its design. Their work is largely rational, meaning that aesthetic decisions are justified by an understanding of the product’s purpose.

Dieter Rams 

Photo via Rams/Gary Hustwit.

[Quoted] Nike cofounder Phil Knight


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




You can’t be afraid of offending people. You can’t try and go down the middle of the road. You have to take a stand on something. – Phil Knight, founder, Nike

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business recently hosted a conversation with Nike co-founder Phil Knight and later published excerpts from that conversation. They are worth a read. Sadly, I couldn’t find the original talk anywhere on the GSB, unfortunately.

[02.07.2019] The Daily Noted


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




  • 8:17 AM: TechCrunch should hire my friend Julie Zerbo, who is an amazing investigative fashion writer and should be an exciting person to tackle the “direct to consumer” brand boom in a non-sycophant manner we so deeply need. #
  • 8:02 AM: Backblaze, an online backup company, does an analysis of its infrastructure (which is really big and awesome) and finds that in 2016 the average size of hard drives in use was 4.5 TB. By 2018 the average size had grown to 7.7 TB.” And at present, Seagate 10 TB drives in their infrastructure have the lowest failure rates.
  • 7:51 AM: Could it be Murphy’s Law? How is it that I have lost two left-ear AirPods in succession. Now I am stuck with two right-ear AirPods.
  • 6:55 AM: SmugMug should give its pro-level customers free Flickr Pro accounts as part of Continue reading “[02.07.2019] The Daily Noted”

You just never know what life brings


This post is by Om Malik from OnMyOm: Om‘s Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When I went to sleep last night, I was excited about the prospects of the new day. I had no idea that it would turn out to be one of those red letter days that teach you pretty much everything about life. Now that I think of it, it was a good parable for life, and a reminder of how despite our illusions, we are never really in control. Continue reading “You just never know what life brings”

Federer goes to Uniqlo


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When it comes to men’s tennis, there is no one better, cooler and nicer than Roger Federer. A man of an insatiable appetite for winning (with a smile) and lover of beautiful watches, hit a fierce backhand when after 20-years of being a Nike guy, he switched to Uniqlo. He is getting $300 million to become the global brand ambassador for the budget-brand-from-Japan. Continue reading “Federer goes to Uniqlo”

I don’t want my Financial TV


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fox Business News is beating the crap out of CNBC.

  • In 2Q 2018, Bartiromo’s Mornings led Squawk Box among total viewers, 109,000 to 104,000
  • FBN grew … beating CNBC by 23% (203,000 total viewers compared with CNBC’s 165,000).
  • Among viewers 25-54, the demographic most coveted by advertisers, CNBC finished ahead of Fox Business in the second quarter, with 31,000 viewers to FBN’s 25,000
  • Lou Dobbs Tonight, which won among total viewers (319,000) and among viewers 25-54 (36,000)

In reality, these numbers are so small and irrelevant that I wonder if anyone wants the so-called financial TV. It is mostly vanity television — only for business leaders to get on tv. From an advertiser perspective, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook and other places offer more finely tuned audiences for much lower prices.

In the plus column, these puny sized numbers should be a big boost for (former Buzzfeed President) Jon Steinberg and his Cheddar, Continue reading “I don’t want my Financial TV”

Guest Posts Gone Wild


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Buzzfeed is reporting that one single contributor who wrote 700 articles for Forbes and 300 for Entrepreneur magazine, has been charging brands to mention their names in his articles. It is yet another posts-payola scheme.

BuzzFeed News also obtained an email pitch from an AudienceBloom employee to a potential client in which he offered the ability for them to review an article with a brand mention before it was published. The pitch said a mention with a link back in a “premium tier” publication like Mashable would cost between $1,200 and $2,000.

In December 2017, Outline reported that “publications such as Mashable, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, Huffington Post and Forbes, wherein freelance writers were taking payments in exchange for favorable coverage.”

It happens with such regularity — especially at Forbes and Entrepreneur — that I usually ignore everything these publications offer. And when someone sends me a link about themselves (or one of their articles), I make it a point to not take them seriously in the future.

Continue reading “Guest Posts Gone Wild”

Past & Future


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Politics, business, technology, innovation… past always tries to hold down the future. Every time I read an article about Brexit, dismissal of Tesla, or new ideas, it all boils down to our dogmas and collective memories coming in the way of the future. The past can be a great guide, but it can’t be our social destination.

These days, the world seems dark at times, and as a result, I retreat into books, music, and art. Only art (including writing and blogging) allow you to remix the past and build the future. So much of our modern photography is influenced by those photos from a 100 years ago.

And they were influenced by masters (painters) from before, and they got their inspiration from the giants of the Renaissance. HipHop is a remix. I don’t know whether future is good or bad, but keeping an open mind does make present pretty Continue reading “Past & Future”

Leica, ready to flip?


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After five years of using Leica products, I can safely say that Leica does make fantastic products, and expensive as they might be, they are going to last what seems like a lifetime. I bought my Leica SL, about three years ago. It was so advanced and perfectly built that even today, I find it at par with recent competitive products. The lenses — especially the M class of lenses — cost a lot of money, but I am leaving those for my godchildren. In other words, the very qualities that make Leica products expensive, make it hard for the company to monetize their customer base. With overall camera market shrinking, thanks to the rise of computational photography, like all its rivals, Leica must see the writing on the wall.

Continue reading “Leica, ready to flip?”

My only camera rig


This post is by Thorsten from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I love between analog and digital worlds. My 12.9 inch iPad Pro and Logitech K811 keyboard are my preferred computer combination. For a timepiece, nothing like the artful work from masters at Grand Seiko. And for photography, I now work exclusively with Leica M-A and an f2/50mm Summicron.

All my other film and digital cameras, except for my Leica SL and Fuji x100F are on their way to new homes. It is very freeing to have a handful of lenses — imperfection is my new mantra. My film of choice Kodak Tri-X 400. My camera strap (Dsptch x Stash Special Edition) is a gift from my friend, Dsptch founder Richard Liu.

PS: I accidentally posted this on my photo blog instead of posting here.

Startups, Ideas and Timing


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“The two worst things to be as a startup is too early or too late. Too late you can’t recover from, but you can survive too early if you have a great CEO and loyal investors.”

This quote in Dan Primack’s newsletter (via Axios) from Paul Maeder, investor and board member at the recently public Carbon Black, which started its journey 16 years ago reminded me of my conversation with Silicon Valley legend and serial entrepreneur, Andy Bechtolsheim.

The Paywall Quandary: How many subscriptions does one really need?


This post is by Om Malik from Om on Tech


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Bloomberg is the latest to go behind the paywall. And it is going to annually cost about $420. Felix Salmon (over on Slate) argues that Bloomberg is going behind a paywall because it can as this is a season to go behind the paywall. And he points out that we should save our dollars for some other publication, which needs it. Well, that’s not how capitalism works. You pay for things you want.

My response to his commentary on Twitter was: “Bloomberg gives you information edge, and thus it would be one new subscription I will pay for, despite their anti-Apple bias. One of the best tech teams, global coverage. They are premium & are charging premium $$$s.”

And I mean that. Continue reading “The Paywall Quandary: How many subscriptions does one really need?”

True & the VC Firm of the year


This post is by Om Malik from Om Malik


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




National Venture Capital Association (NVCA) named our partnership, True Ventures, as the venture capital firm of the year. It is always an honor to be recognized by our peers, but in the end, the award is a reflection of the people who we serve — the founders, their teams and their families. 10,000 of them. It has taken over a decade to get here — one startup at a time. Some of them are big (Automattic), some define the zeitgeist (Blue Bottle, Peloton, and Ring) and others are writing the script of tomorrow today, companies like Veniam and Zymergen.

Continue reading “True & the VC Firm of the year”

My Top 25 Daily Tech Reporters


This post is by Om Malik from Om Malik


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I often get asked — who are your favorite technology journalists. I don’t know how to answer that question: they are all good on any given day. Some are great at writing features. Others are just fantastic on a day-to-day basis, displaying a broad sense of understanding. Some are just a great combination of all those characteristics — and here my current top 25 favorite reporters, neatly curated as a  Twitter List of my top 25 reporters who cover technology.

Why? Because they keep me informed on all aspects of the technology industry on a daily basis. They create a comprehensive, 360-degree view of the industry. I have not included subscription-only services such as The Information — I don’t subscribe. I did at one point but wasn’t reading it that much. I also excluded people who didn’t share work of other writers. These 25 people do a good job of Continue reading “My Top 25 Daily Tech Reporters”