How China Is Upending Western Marketing Practices


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Kimberly Whitler, assistant professor at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business, believes the days of transplanting well-worn Western marketing practices into national markets may be numbered. She has researched marketing campaigns in China and finds they are faster, cheaper, and often more effective than traditional Western ones. Moreover, she argues they may be better suited to today’s global marketplace. Whitler is the author of the HBR article “What Western Marketers Can Learn from China.”

The Social


This post is by Jeff Carter from Points and Figures


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When I see the CEO of a company doing a lot of panels and spending a lot of time being in the public eye, my suspicions get raised.  When you are on panels and spending a lot of time on social media you aren’t interacting with customers and running the company.

Doing it doesn’t mean your company is going badly, it also doesn’t mean it’s going great.

One thing for sure I have never heard a CEO say, “Boy, all those social media posts I did and all those panels I did really turned the company.”

The flip side is if you aren’t doing it, you have fear of missing out.

I get the fear.  What you need to do is measure your impact.  Figure out the right metrics to measure and then measure them.  You have to figure out what social media platform is Continue reading “The Social”

Taxing the Rich, and the “Woke” Advertising Trend


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Youngme, Felix, and Mihir debate two of the dramatic and controversial tax ideas being proposed by Democrats (a 70% marginal income tax rate and a 2% wealth tax), before discussing the trend among brands like Gillette, Nike, and Pepsi to launch “woke” advertising campaigns. They also offer their After Hours picks for the week.

The New Pressures Facing CMOs and How to Overcome Them


This post is by Keith Ferrazzi from HBR.org


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Julien Fourniol/Baloulumix/Getty Images

A new study out by Spencer Stuart shows an insane number of chief marketing officers who’ve been fired during 2018. But frankly, it’s not a surprise. I served as CMO for Deloitte Consulting and then Starwood Hotels & Resorts, and when I have coached executive teams through transformations, I’ve seen many teams at an impasse with their CMO.

There are lessons we can learn by exploring why so many CMOs get fired—and they can be useful to any executive working to navigate the radically interdependent world of business today.

Although the role of a CMO has been evolving and expanding, people on executive teams still seem to think the CMO must have expertise in every element of her role. In most cases that is a prescription for failure. Success comes, rather, by embracing a role as the facilitator of growth for the business and the four most

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Brands Shouldn’t Believe Everything They Read About Themselves Online


This post is by Joe Panepinto from HBR.org


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“Don’t believe everything you hear” is good advice — especially in an era of fake news and alternative facts. The same goes for managers who often rely on social-sentiment analysis to get a handle on what consumers think of their brands.

Social-sentiment analysis is the process of algorithmically analyzing social posts, comments, and behaviors and categorizing them into positive, negative, or neutral. Many companies use it to understand how their customers are feeling about their brands.

We recently conducted an extensive social-sentiment analysis with a team of researchers at Boston University’s Emerging Media Studies program as part of our Experience Brand Index research this past spring. In that research, we asked 4,000 consumers in the United States and United Kingdom about their actions and interactions with a wide range of brands over the last six months. These experiences were rated across more than a dozen dimensions, and we

Continue reading “Brands Shouldn’t Believe Everything They Read About Themselves Online”