How Iceland Is Closing the Gender Wage Gap


This post is by Ines Wagner from HBR.org

Three takeaways from the country’s landmark equal-pay policy.

Gender Equity Is Not Zero Sum


This post is by Katica Roy from HBR.org

To move toward a fairer world, we need to dismantle the fallacy.

Research: Women Are Better Leaders During a Crisis


This post is by Jack Zenger from HBR.org

An analysis of 360-degree assessments done during the pandemic.

How the Gender Balance of Investment Teams Shapes the Risks They Take


This post is by Luisa Alemany from HBR.org

New research finds that women are more likely to make big bets when important social issues are on the table.

Welcome Back to Remote Work, New Moms


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Solidarity and support for women returning from parental leave to a new normal — one that’s inhospitable to mothers’ careers.

Chart: A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist

How People Globally Spend Their Time

A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time

We all have the same 24 hours in a day, but we don’t spend them the same way. Some prioritize family time or household chores, while others cherish a good night’s sleep or seeing friends.

This chart from Our World in Data compares the average time allocated across various day-to-day activities, from paid work to leisurely activities.

The data for the 33 countries profiled come from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Time Use database, for ages 15 through 64 years old.

Countries with the Highest Time Spent Per Activity

As the chart shows, basic patterns—work, rest, and play—emerge across the board.

When it comes to paid work, Japan emerges the highest on this list with approximately 6.5 hours per day. However, this country also has some of the highest overtime in a workweek. In contrast, European countries such as France and Spain report nearly half the same hours (less than 3 hours) of paid work per day on average.

Certain trends, however, transcend cultural boundaries. Those in Mexico find themselves spending significant portions of the day (3 hours or more) on housework, as do those in Portugal.

Activity category Country with highest time spent Time spent in minutes
Paid work 🇯🇵 Japan 326 (Approx. 6.5 hrs)
Education 🇰🇷 South Korea 57 
Care for household members 🇮🇪 Ireland 61
Housework 🇲🇽 Mexico 187 (Approx. 3 hrs)
Shopping 🇩🇪 Germany 32
Other unpaid work & volunteering 🇯🇵 Japan 98 (Approx. 1.5 hrs)
Sleep 🇿🇦 South Africa 553 (Approx. 9 hrs)
Eating  🇫🇷 France 133 (Approx. 2 hours)
Personal care 🇫🇷 France 107 (Approx. 1 hr 45 min)
Sports 🇪🇸 Spain 42
Attending events 🇮🇪 Ireland 42
Seeing friends 🇿🇦 South Africa 82
TV and radio 🇺🇸 U.S. 148 (Approx. 2.5 hrs)
Other leisure
(Religious/ civic duties, or unspecified)
🇳🇴 Norway 154 (Approx. 2.5 hrs)

As the saying goes, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. In the realm of leisure activities, those in the U.S. spend approximately 2.5 hours consuming media in a day, a number that has risen even higher during the pandemic.

Meanwhile, another interesting cultural pattern is that people in France spend the most time eating, approximately 2 hours per day. These durations are similar to those in other Mediterranean countries such as Greece, Italy, and Spain—perhaps because meals are viewed as a social activity in these cultures.

Gender Disparities in Time Spent

Digging deeper, another way to look at how people spend their time globally is through the lens of gender.

Women spend nearly three times more in unpaid care work compared to men—a whopping total of 1.1 trillion hours each year—which means a lot less leisure time. This inequality is clearly defined by country in the following scatterplot:

In Norway, both men and women have equally high levels of leisure time—though it’s a rare example of such a case.

Meanwhile, in countries like India or China, significant gender gaps prevent women from moving up the socioeconomic ladder, potentially costing trillions of dollars to the global economy.

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The post Chart: A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

Chart: A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist

How People Globally Spend Their Time

A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time

We all have the same 24 hours in a day, but we don’t spend them the same way. Some prioritize family time or household chores, while others cherish a good night’s sleep or seeing friends.

This chart from Our World in Data compares the average time allocated across various day-to-day activities, from paid work to leisurely activities.

The data for the 33 countries profiled come from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Time Use database, for ages 15 through 64 years old.

Countries with the Highest Time Spent Per Activity

As the chart shows, basic patterns—work, rest, and play—emerge across the board.

When it comes to paid work, Japan emerges the highest on this list with approximately 5.5 hours per day. However, this country also has some of the highest overtime in a workweek. In contrast, European countries such as France and Spain report nearly half the same hours (less than 3 hours) of paid work per day on average.

Certain trends, however, transcend cultural boundaries. Those in Mexico find themselves spending significant portions of the day (3 hours or more) on housework, as do those in Portugal.

Activity category Country with highest time spent Time spent in minutes
Paid work 🇯🇵 Japan 326 (Approx. 5.5 hrs)
Education 🇰🇷 South Korea 57 
Care for household members 🇮🇪 Ireland 61
Housework 🇲🇽 Mexico 187 (Approx. 3 hrs)
Shopping 🇩🇪 Germany 32
Other unpaid work & volunteering 🇯🇵 Japan 98 (Approx. 1.5 hrs)
Sleep 🇿🇦 South Africa 553 (Approx. 9 hrs)
Eating  🇫🇷 France 133 (Approx. 2 hours)
Personal care 🇫🇷 France 107 (Approx. 1 hr 45 min)
Sports 🇪🇸 Spain 42
Attending events 🇮🇪 Ireland 42
Seeing friends 🇿🇦 South Africa 82
TV and radio 🇺🇸 U.S. 148 (Approx. 2.5 hrs)
Other leisure
(Religious/ civic duties, or unspecified)
🇳🇴 Norway 154 (Approx. 2.5 hrs)

As the saying goes, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. In the realm of leisure activities, those in the U.S. spend approximately 2.5 hours consuming media in a day, a number that has risen even higher during the pandemic.

Meanwhile, another interesting cultural pattern is that people in France spend the most time eating, approximately 2 hours per day. These durations are similar to those in other Mediterranean countries such as Greece, Italy, and Spain—perhaps because meals are viewed as a social activity in these cultures.

Gender Disparities in Time Spent

Digging deeper, another way to look at how people spend their time globally is through the lens of gender.

Women spend nearly three times more in unpaid care work compared to men—a whopping total of 1.1 trillion hours each year—which means a lot less leisure time. This inequality is clearly defined by country in the following scatterplot:

In Norway, both men and women have equally high levels of leisure time—though it’s a rare example of such a case.

Meanwhile, in countries like India or China, significant gender gaps prevent women from moving up the socioeconomic ladder, potentially costing trillions of dollars to the global economy.

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist


Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

The post Chart: A Global Look at How People Spend Their Time appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

When You Need Time Off for Health Reasons


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Advice on approaching the stressful decisions and conversations that come with having an acute or chronic illness.

Hundreds of Google workers condemn firing of AI scientist Timnit Gebru


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Julia Carrie Wong in San Francisco and agencies. The original is [linked here]

More than 1,000 researchers also sign letter after Black expert on ethics says Google tried to suppress her research on bias

Hundreds of Google employees and more than 1,000 academic researchers are speaking out in protest after a prominent Black scientist studying the ethics of artificial intelligence said she was fired by Google after the company attempted to suppress her research and she criticized its diversity efforts.

Timnit Gebru, who was the technical co-lead of Google’s Ethical AI team, wrote on Twitter on Wednesday that she had been fired after sending an email to an internal group for women and allies working in the company’s AI unit.

Continue reading…

More than 1,200 Google workers condemn firing of AI scientist Timnit Gebru


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Julia Carrie Wong in San Francisco and agencies. The original is [linked here]

More than 1,500 researchers also sign letter after Black expert on ethics says Google tried to suppress her research on bias

More than 1,200 Google employees and more than 1,500 academic researchers are speaking out in protest after a prominent Black scientist studying the ethics of artificial intelligence said she was fired by Google after the company attempted to suppress her research and she criticized its diversity efforts.

Timnit Gebru, who was the technical co-lead of Google’s Ethical AI team, wrote on Twitter on Wednesday that she had been fired after sending an email to an internal group for women and allies working in the company’s AI unit.

Continue reading…

Has Anything Changed for Black Women at Work?


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

What four Black women make of the discussions and actions around racial justice happening inside their workplaces.

Has Anything Changed for Black Women at Work?


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

What four Black women make of the discussions and actions around racial justice happening inside their workplaces.

Anxiety, Depression, and Working Moms in a Pandemic


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Sociologist Jessica Calarco is studying how the pandemic is affecting the mental health of working mothers.

Anxiety, Depression, and Working Moms in a Pandemic


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Sociologist Jessica Calarco is studying how the pandemic is affecting the mental health of working mothers.

When You’re Ready for a Big Career Move


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

It might be time to let go of limiting beliefs and make that bold move.

When You’re Ready for a Big Career Move


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

It might be time to let go of limiting beliefs and make that bold move.

Transgender, Gender-Fluid, Nonbinary, and Gender-Nonconforming Employees Deserve Better Policies


This post is by Lily Zheng from HBR.org

Even well-intentioned organizations inadvertently reinforce outdated gender norms.

Transgender, Gender-Fluid, Nonbinary, and Gender-Nonconforming Employees Deserve Better Policies


This post is by Lily Zheng from HBR.org

Even well-intentioned organizations inadvertently reinforce outdated gender norms.

A Q&A with Freddie Mac Single-Family Leader Donna Corley on How and Why Organizations Need More Women in Leadership Roles – SPONSOR CONTENT FROM FREDDIE MAC


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Sponsor content from Freddie Mac.

Let’s Take Our Side Gigs Off the Back-Burner


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org

Making progress on personal projects while working a full-time job.