a16z Podcast: The Great Data Debate


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by dasrush. The original is [linked here]

Lakes v. warehouses, analytics v. AI/ML, SQL v. everything else… As the technical capabilities of data lakes and data warehouses converge, are the separate tools and teams that run AI/ML and analytics converging as well?

In this podcast, originally recorded …

The post a16z Podcast: The Great Data Debate appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

a16z Podcast: The Great Data Debate


This post is by dasrush from Andreessen Horowitz

Lakes v. warehouses, analytics v. AI/ML, SQL v. everything else… As the technical capabilities of data lakes and data warehouses converge, are the separate tools and teams that run AI/ML and analytics converging as well?

In this podcast, originally recorded …

The post a16z Podcast: The Great Data Debate appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

Emerging Architectures for Modern Data Infrastructure


This post is by dasrush from Andreessen Horowitz

As an industry, we’ve gotten exceptionally good at building large, complex software systems. We’re now starting to see the rise of massive, complex systems built around data – where the primary business value of the system comes from the analysis …

The post Emerging Architectures for Modern Data Infrastructure appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

In a year like no other in recent memory, the data ecosystem is showing not just remarkable resilience but exciting vibrancy. When COVID hit the world a few months ago, an extended period of gloom seemed all but inevitable.   Yet, as per Satya Nadella, “two years of digital transformation [occurred] in two months”.  Cloud … Continue reading Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape

Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

In a year like no other in recent memory, the data ecosystem is showing not just remarkable resilience but exciting vibrancy. When COVID hit the world a few months ago, an extended period of gloom seemed all but inevitable.   Yet, as per Satya Nadella, “two years of digital transformation [occurred] in two months”.  Cloud … Continue reading Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape

Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

In a year like no other in recent memory, the data ecosystem is showing not just remarkable resilience but exciting vibrancy. When COVID hit the world a few months ago, an extended period of gloom seemed all but inevitable.   Yet, as per Satya Nadella, “two years of digital transformation [occurred] in two months”.  Cloud … Continue reading Resilience and Vibrancy: The 2020 Data & AI Landscape

A Buffett of Snowflake


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Om Malik. The original is [linked here]

gold snow flakes decor
Photo by Tomas Yates on Unsplash

The Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett, known for occasionally partaking in ice cream from Dairy Queen, is going in for a Snowflake scoop. Snowflake is a red hot data warehousing company viewed as one of the best next-generation enterprise companies to tap the public markets in 2020. 

In an amended S-1 filing, Salesforce Ventures and Berkshire Hathaway are buying 3.125 million shares each at $80 a share. That is $250 million each. Berkshire Hathaway will also purchase just over 4 million shares of common stock from one of the stockholders — bringing Buffett’s total to about $500 million into the new company. The company is going to be selling 28 million shares for between $75 to $85 a share, which will value the company well north of $20 billion.

Benoit Dageville, Thierry Cruanes, and Marcin Zukowski (all formerly with Oracle) cofounded Snowflake in 2012. They were betting on the explosion in the amount of data and the cloud. A decade ago, companies like Teradata and Netezza helped corporations achieve insights from their data, which primarily resided on their private infrastructure. Since then, the cloud has become key to any infrastructure, and the amount of data has exponentially increased. 

Three major cloud providers — Amazon, Google, and Microsoft — also have big data offerings in Redshift, BigQuery, and Azure SQL. Snowflake managed to use its neutral position to become a big player by better execution and better focus. 

Snowflake is a good template for fully-managed cloud services. Its rivals, such as Databricks, sell software and customers get their servers. Snowflake does everything, including managing the servers. As consumers, we are used to this “server-less model” when we buy our cloud services. Snowflake has done that for companies big and small. They have done an excellent job of pricing it well and making it feel more secure for the cloud-skeptics. 

Of course, Snowflake’s ongoing success doesn’t mean that the big cloud players are going to keel over. AWS Redshift is big business, and as a standalone company, don’t be surprised if the size of its revenues is closer to Snowflake. On the other hand, Google is in the process of finding ways to get BigQuery available on other platforms. 

Snowflake, meanwhile, benefits from being led by CEO Frank Slootman. I got a chance to spend some time with him when he was running ServiceNow, and it was easy to see why he is respected in the industry and by investors. 

(An interesting aside: Mike Speiser, who was one of Snowflake’s catalysts, is having quite a summer. He is also an investor in Sumologic, which has filed to go public as well. Mike, who joined Sutter Hill Ventures from Yahoo, is quite a storage nerd. He sold Yahoo to Bix, which is when I first met him. Later, he wrote a seminal piece for my old publication. He talked about the rise of SSDs in the data center and its long term impact.)

When I read the news of Berkshire’s investment in Snowflake, I had a couple of thoughts. 

First, Berkshire’s investment will be a big boost for the Snowflake offering, especially in light of the fact that Buffett’s group has often eschewed the technology sector. It has been an investor in communication and telecom providers, such as Liberty and Verizon. However, they did acquire a sizeable Apple position, whose dividend alone to Berkshire Hathaway in 2019 was nearly a billion dollars. In 2019, he famously pointed out that “In 54 years, I don’t think Berkshire has ever bought a new issue.”

Secondly, Berkshire’s embrace of Snowflake — which is still loss-making, but fast-growing and well-established — is a sign of the times: no matter where you look, the future engine of growth is coming for technology and all that it enables. We are experiencing a historic shift away from a traditional industrial economy to one with a digital heartbeat.

Berkshire Hathaway might have a propensity for more traditional businesses — after all, people still want to buy insurance, fast food, and homes — but they are being transformed by technology and data. The power of data to transform business was one of the key reasons I started the (sadly defunct) Structure conference back in 2008. From storing it (data warehousing), making sense of it (analytics), and building applications and services with it, data is a core part of the future of industry and business.

And that’s why Buffett wants a scoop of Snowflake.


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Why Warren Buffett wants a scoop of Snowflake


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om

gold snow flakes decor
Photo by Tomas Yates on Unsplash

The Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett, known for occasionally partaking in ice cream from Dairy Queen, is going in for a Snowflake scoop. Snowflake is a red hot data warehousing company viewed as one of the best next-generation enterprise companies to tap the public markets in 2020. 

In an amended S-1 filing, Salesforce Ventures and Berkshire Hathaway are buying 3.125 million shares each at $80 a share. That is $250 million each. Berkshire Hathaway will also purchase just over 4 million shares of common stock from one of the stockholders — bringing Buffett’s total to about $500 million into the new company. The company is going to be selling 28 million shares for between $75 to $85 a share, which will value the company well north of $20 billion.

When I read the news of Berkshire’s investment in Snowflake, I had a couple of thoughts. 

First, Berkshire’s investment will be a big boost for the Snowflake offering, especially in light of the fact that Buffett’s group has often eschewed the technology sector. It has been an investor in communication and telecom providers, such as Liberty and Verizon. However, they did acquire a sizeable Apple position, whose dividend alone to Berkshire Hathaway in 2019 was nearly a billion dollars. In 2019, he famously pointed out that “In 54 years, I don’t think Berkshire has ever bought a new issue.”

Secondly, Berkshire’s embrace of Snowflake — which is still loss-making, but fast-growing and well-established — is a sign of the times: no matter where you look, the future engine of growth is coming for technology and all that it enables. We are experiencing a historic shift away from a traditional industrial economy to one with a digital heartbeat.

Berkshire Hathaway might have a propensity for more traditional businesses — after all, people still want to buy insurance, fast food, and homes — but they are being transformed by technology and data. The power of data to transform business was one of the key reasons I started the (sadly defunct) Structure conference back in 2008. From storing it (data warehousing), making sense of it (analytics), and building applications and services with it, data is a core part of the future of industry and business.

And that’s why Buffett wants a scoop of Snowflake. 

Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Palantir S-1 is a long and meaty read, and a pretty fascinating one considering the company was highly secretive, and occasionally controversial, for so many years.  It is also written in a very opinionated style: the newly Colorado-based company takes aim at Silicon Valley and is not exactly charitable to its competitors. Particularly compared … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir

Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Palantir S-1 is a long and meaty read, and a pretty fascinating one considering the company was highly secretive, and often controversial, for so many years.  It is also written in a very opinionated style: the newly Colorado-based company takes aim at Silicon Valley and is not exactly charitable to its competitors. Particularly compared … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir

Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Palantir S-1 is a long and meaty read, and a pretty fascinating one considering the company was highly secretive, and often controversial, for so many years.  It is also written in a very opinionated style: the newly Colorado-based company takes aim at Silicon Valley and is not exactly charitable to its competitors. Particularly compared … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Palantir

Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by mattturck. The original is [linked here]

The Snowflake IPO is shaping up to be particularly exciting.  Their S-1 shows very impressive metrics across the board, including explosive revenue growth at scale (growing 174% annually to $264.7 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2020), and “land and expand” motion (169% net revenue retention in 2020), making Snowflake one of the fastest … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake

Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Snowflake IPO is shaping up to be particularly exciting.  Their S-1 shows very impressive metrics across the board, including explosive revenue growth at scale (growing 174% annually to $264.7 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2020), and “land and expand” motion (169% net revenue retention in 2020), making Snowflake one of the fastest … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake

Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Snowflake IPO is shaping up to be particularly exciting.  Their S-1 shows very impressive metrics across the board, including explosive revenue growth at scale (growing 174% annually to $264.7 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2020), and “land and expand” motion (169% net revenue retention in 2020), making Snowflake one of the fastest … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake

Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake


This post is by mattturck from Matt Turck

The Snowflake IPO is shaping up to be particularly exciting.  Their S-1 shows very impressive metrics across the board, including explosive revenue growth at scale (growing 174% annually to $264.7 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2020), and “land and expand” motion (169% net revenue retention in 2020), making Snowflake one of the fastest … Continue reading Quick S-1 Teardown: Snowflake

a16z Podcast: Reining in Complexity — Data Science & Future of AI/ML Businesses


This post is by Sonal Chokshi from Andreessen Horowitz

There is no spoon. Or rather, “There is no such thing as ‘data’, there’s just frozen models”, argues Peter Wang, the co-founder and CEO of Anaconda — who also created the PyData conferences and grew the early data science …

The post a16z Podcast: Reining in Complexity — Data Science & Future of AI/ML Businesses appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

AIoT: When Artificial Intelligence Meets the Internet of Things


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist

AIoT: When Artificial Intelligence Meets the Internet of Things

AIoT: When AI Meets the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a technology helping us to reimagine daily life, but artificial intelligence (AI) is the real driving force behind the IoT’s full potential.

From its most basic applications of tracking our fitness levels, to its wide-reaching potential across industries and urban planning, the growing partnership between AI and the IoT means that a smarter future could occur sooner than we think.

This infographic by TSMC highlights the breakthrough technologies and trends making that shift possible, and how we’re continuing to push the boundaries.

AI + IoT = Superpowers of Innovation

IoT devices use the internet to communicate, collect, and exchange information about our online activities. Every day, they generate 1 billion GB of data.

By 2025, there’s projected to be 42 billion IoT-connected devices globally. It’s only natural that as these device numbers grow, the swaths of data will too. That’s where AI steps in—lending its learning capabilities to the connectivity of the IoT.

The IoT is empowered by three key emerging technologies:

  • Artificial Intelligence (AI)
    Programmable functions and systems that enable devices to learn, reason, and process information like humans.
  • 5G Networks
    Fifth generation mobile networks with high-speed, near-zero lag for real time data processing.
  • Big Data
    Enormous volumes of data processed from numerous internet-connected sources.

Together, these interconnected devices are transforming the way we interact with our devices at home and at work, creating the AIoT (“Artificial Intelligence of Things”) in the process.

The Major AIoT Segments

So where are AI and the IoT headed together?

There are four major segments in which the AIoT is making an impact: wearables, smart home, smart city, and smart industry:

1. Wearables

Wearable devices such as smartwatches continuously monitor and track user preferences and habits. Not only has this led to impactful applications in the healthtech sector, it also works well for sports and fitness. According to leading tech research firm Gartner, the global wearable device market is estimated to see more than $87 billion in revenue by 2023.

2. Smart Home

Houses that respond to your every request are no longer restricted to science fiction. Smart homes are able to leverage appliances, lighting, electronic devices and more, learning a homeowner’s habits and developing automated “support.”

This seamless access also brings about additional perks of improved energy efficiency. As a result, the smart home market could see a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 25% between 2020-2025, to reach $246 billion.

3. Smart City

As more and more people flock from rural to urban areas, cities are evolving into safer, more convenient places to live. Smart city innovations are keeping pace, with investments going towards improving public safety, transport, and energy efficiency.

The practical applications of AI in traffic control are already becoming clear. In New Delhi, home to some of the world’s most traffic-congested roads, an Intelligent Transport Management System (ITMS) is in use to make ‘real time dynamic decisions on traffic flows’.

4. Smart Industry

Last but not least, industries from manufacturing to mining rely on digital transformation to become more efficient and reduce human error.

From real-time data analytics to supply-chain sensors, smart devices help prevent costly errors in industry. In fact, Gartner also estimates that over 80% of enterprise IoT projects will incorporate AI by 2022.

The Untapped Potential of AI & IoT

AIoT innovation is only accelerating, and promises to lead us into a more connected future.

Category Today Tomorrow
Edge computing Smart thermostats
Smart appliances
Home robots
Autonomous vehicles
Voice AI Smart speakers Natural language processing (NLP)
ePayment voice authentication
Vision AI Massive object detection Video analytics on the edge
Super 8K resolution

The AIoT fusion is increasingly becoming more mainstream, as it continues to push the boundaries of data processing and intelligent learning for years to come.

Just like any company that blissfully ignored the Internet at the turn of the century, the ones that dismiss the Internet of Things risk getting left behind.

Jared Newman, Technology Analyst

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The post AIoT: When Artificial Intelligence Meets the Internet of Things appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

Secretive data startup Palantir has confidentially filed for an IPO


This post is by Kirsten Korosec from Fundings & Exits – TechCrunch

Secretive big data and analytics startup Palantir, co-founded by Peter Thiel, said late Monday it has confidentially filed paperwork with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to go public.

Its statement said little more. “The public listing is expected to take place after the SEC completes its review process, subject to market and other conditions.”

Palantir did not say when it plans to go public nor did it provide other information, such as how many shares it would potentially sell or the share price range for the IPO. Confidential IPO filings allow companies to bypass the traditional IPO filing mechanisms that give insights into their inner workings such as financial figures and potential risks. Instead, Palantir can explore the early stages of setting itself up for a public listing without the public scrutiny that comes with the process. The strategy has been used by companies such as Spotify, Slack and Uber. However, a confidential filing doesn’t always translate to an IPO.

A Palantir spokesperson, when reached, declined to comment further.

Palantir is one of the more secretive firms in Silicon Valley, a provider of big data and analytics technologies, including to the U.S. government and intelligence community. Much of that work has drawn controversies from privacy and civil liberties activists. For example, investigations show that the company’s data mining software was used to create profiles of immigrants and consequently aid deportation efforts by the ICE.

As the coronavirus pandemic spread throughout the world, Palantir pitched its technology to bring big data to tracking efforts.

Last week, Palantir filed its first Form D in four years, indicating that it is raising $961 million. According to the filing, $550 million has already been raised and capital commitments for the remaining allotment have been secured.

With today’s news, the cash raise looks complementary to the company’s ambitions to go public. One report estimates that the company’s valuation hovers at $26 billion.

Palantir’s filing is another example of how the IPO market is heating up yet again, despite the freeze COVID-19 put on so many companies. Last week, insurance provider Lemonade debuted on the public market to warm waters. Accolade, a healthcare benefits company, similarly sold more shares than expected.

a16z Podcast: The Future of Primary Care


This post is by htidnam from Andreessen Horowitz

Primary care was meant to be the front door to the healthcare system, but in some ways never set up for success to begin with. We need a new operating system for primary care—one with a different, deeper understanding of …

The post a16z Podcast: The Future of Primary Care appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

Indonesian startup Delman raises $1.6 million to help companies clean up data


This post is by Catherine Shu from Fundings & Exits – TechCrunch

Delman, a Jakarta-based data management startup, has raised $1.6 million in seed funding. The round was led by Intudo Ventures, with participation from Prasetia Dwidharma Ventures and Qlue Performa Indonesia, and will be used to establish a research and development center and hire software engineers and data scientists.

Delman was founded in 2018 by chief executive officer Surya Halim, chief product officer Raymond Christopher and chief technology officer Theo Budiyanto, who were classmates at the University of California, Berkeley. After graduation, they worked at tech companies in Silicon Valley, including Google and Splunk, before deciding to focus on the Indonesian market.

Originally launched as an end-to-end big data analytics provider, Delman shifted its focus to data preparation and management after talking to clients in Indonesia, said Halim. Many companies said they had budgeted for expensive data analytics solution, but then realized their data was not ready for analysis because it was spread across multiple formats. Delman’s mission is to make it easier for data engineers and scientists to do their jobs by cleaning up and preparing data.

Halim says many large companies in Indonesia typically spend up to $200,000 to clean and warehouse data, but Delman gives them a more cost-efficient and faster alternative.

“We have the capability to do analytics and data visualization for clients, but there are so many established companies that already do that, which is why we shifted our business model to something more niche and needed,” said Halim. “It also enables us to open our door to partner with everyone doing data analytics services.”

While newer companies and startups have cleaner datasets, Halim said many older Indonesian companies, especially ones with branches in multiple cities, often have large amounts of data spread across pen-and-paper ledgers, Excel spreadsheets and other software. The data may also have code, keywords and typos that need to be corrected.

“It’s easier for a new company, because everything is already standardized,” Halim said, “But if a company that was established in the 1970s wants to unify previous generations of data to integrate it into their system and keep notes on what customer behavior is like in order to compete with up-and-coming companies, then they need to have a data-driven policy.”

Delman is industry-agnostic and its clients range from large corporations and consulting firms to government agencies. Its customers have included PWC and Qlue. Halim said that the startup plans to expand into other Southeast Asian markets and expects that as COVID-19 changes the way people work, companies will want to invest more heavily in their IT infrastructure and make their databases easier to access outside of a central location.

In a press statement, Intudo Ventures founding partner Eddy Chan said, “By combining a highly localized approach with global technical expertise, Delman is providing Indonesian businesses with Indonesian-developed big data solutions, ultimately leading to better outcomes for end-users. Since meeting the Delman founding team in Silicon Valley in 2017, we have witnessed their growth as a management team, and are excited to continue to support them in their entrepreneurial journey ahead.”