The Bing of Maps


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Seven years ago, Apple decided that it’d had enough of using Google’s mapping data. They realized that maps and mapping services were so strategic that they couldn’t really afford to depend on a smartphone rival. So, they began building their own, and in September 2012, the company launched Apple Maps. And if I am being honest, the program has always been akin to that baby face that only a mother can love.

When it launched, Apple Maps was widely panned for being inaccurate and missing key information. Google launched its own dedicated Google Maps for iOS three months later and has never looked back. Apple, on the other hand, has spent billions on Apple Maps in an effort to build a more accurate and rich experience. Yet, in many dense locations, like San Francisco Bay Area or the Big Apple, it still performs like the kid who got into the private school because their grandfather’s name was on one of the buildings. On sheer merit, Google Maps was and still is better. Continue reading “The Bing of Maps”

I am soooo excited about iPadOS


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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iPad Pro has been my primary work computer for over two years. Despite its shortcomings, I have managed to turn into a productivity machine, but the gulf between the iPad and the Apple Macs is still quite vast. However, that is all set to change with the new iPadOS, a version of iOS dedicated to the iPad. It has many improvements that make it easy to banish the laptop to the drawer of forgotten devices. Hopefully, this will bring an end to a debate that has flared up in the Apple enthusiast community again and again. Continue reading “I am soooo excited about iPadOS”

Time for a Playdate


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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A small subset of the Internet jumped with joy and glee when it heard about Playdate — a handheld gaming device, developed by Portland, Oregon-based independent software company Panic, in conjunction with a Swedish engineering company, Teenage Engineering. The device will cost $149 and will ship in early 2020. It is a departure from modern high-resolution attention traps.

It is a throwback to a time when games were valued in terms of fun and joy, and not in things like the time spent in a game, monthly active users, and attention share. Mac-head John Gruber couldn’t contain his enthusiasm, while Anil Dash (of Glitch) was beside himself and wrote a wonderful essay about independent software makers.

Continue reading “Time for a Playdate”

What’s Wrong Apple & Microsoft


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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I am primarily a Mac household — I use my iMac Pro as a digital darkroom. I am not likely to give up my desktop (iMac Pro) anytime soon, and the reason is Photoshop. While I use Lightroom CC as my cloud library/repository — editing starts and ends with Photoshop. I have a streamlined, six step-process to edit my photos and I like the granularity of layers. I also love the flexibility of working with a cloud-library.

The iMac Pro is perfect for editing — it is fast and can handle six to eight layers I usually create for editing a photo. What does suck about the iMac is the mouse — and that is why I almost always default to Microsoft’s mice. In my opinion, Microsoft makes the best PC peripherals in business. They are so beautiful, ergonomic and just delightful to use. Their mice are well made and

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Continue reading “What’s Wrong Apple & Microsoft”

I’ve Said it Before, And I’ll Say It Again


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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If you have been a regular reader, then you know my hobbyhorse: the iPhone is killing the standalone camera. And the latest data released by Camera & Imaging Products Association only reinforces my thesis from a few years ago. Just look at this chart:

Even though we are taking more photos all the time, we are not taking them with standalone cameras. Instead, we are using our smartphones for every kind of photography. Continue reading “I’ve Said it Before, And I’ll Say It Again”

Intel’s Mobile Problem


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Apple’s partnership with Intel to develop a 5G iPhone was not going well, and the writing has been on the wall for some time. It didn’t surprise anyone when Apple had to eat humble pie and settle its patent disputes with Qualcomm. (Daring Fireball has a good analysis of the situation.) This has been a costly blunder — for Apple, at least. Qualcomm is expecting a $2-a-share boost in its earnings as a result of the settlement.

While a lot of digital ink has been spilled on Apple’s retreat, somewhat lost in the shuffle is Intel’s failing grade when it comes to cashing in on mobile opportunities. Soon after the arrangement with Apple fell apart, Intel announced that it was exiting the 5G mobile modem business. This move was undoubtedly related to losing their only customer of consequence. To be sure, the Cupertino Counts can be demanding customers. But without Apple’s orders, Intel can’t pay for the ever-increasing costs of a cutting-edge chip fabrication plant. Continue reading “Intel’s Mobile Problem”

Chips Don’t Lie


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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All that IPO optimism—in addition to ongoing Facebook shenanigans—keep us a wee bit distracted from the dark clouds that are gathering on the horizon. Earlier this week, the Semiconductor Industry Association reported that the “worldwide sales of semiconductors reached $32.9 billion for the month of February 2019, a decrease of 7.3 percent from the January 2019 total of $35.5 billion and 10.6 percent less than the February 2018 total of $36.8 billion.” Coming on the heels of breakneck and record-breaking growth from 2016 to 2018, this is expected to be a slow year, with the industry growing a mere 2.6 percent from $468 billion in 2018.

Sure, some of the shortfalls are due to the trade war between China and the United States. But in reality, you can lay the slowdown at the feet of smartphone sales. After growing for nearly a

Continue reading “Chips Don’t Lie”

Why a Fake Doctor’s Rise is Really a Media Fail


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Earlier this morning, while drinking my morning tea and sifting through my morning reads (on Feedbin, if you want to know), I came across a brilliant piece of journalism from Jennings Brown, a writer for Gizmodo. He unmasked a fabulist and fake doctor who passed himself off as a scientist and an expert psychiatrist on sexual issues. It is a smart piece of old fashioned reporting, which included double checking the claims, picking up the phone, having a conversation or four, and yes, using Google and other databases. It is what a reporter is supposed to do. Kudos to Brown and the editors at Gizmodo. Continue reading “Why a Fake Doctor’s Rise is Really a Media Fail”

What Folding Phones Say About State of SmartPhones


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Huawei Mate.

Over the past few weeks, the world has been talking about folding smartphones. Bigger screens, thicker devices, and $2,000 price tags have not deterred the excitement around these new devices. There are some skeptics, but they are largely drowned out by enthusiasm like that found in The Verge, which already wonders if we will someday “talk of single-sided smartphones in the same nostalgic way we now speak of devices with external antennas, monochrome screens, and fixed-focus lenses.”

As it happens, nostalgia is exactly what I felt when I saw this new generation of smartphones. I was reminded of the first folding device that got me excited about mobile computing: the Blackberry Pager with a full chiclet keyboard and flip-out screen. Then there was Windows CE-powered HP Jornada, which I also loved.

And who could forget the scene in the 1997 thriller, The Saint, when Val Kilmer used his Nokia Communicator to transfer money while hanging out in Moscow? That cinematic moment showed me the way of the future.

Little did I realize how dramatically diminished Nokia’s presence would be in that future. At the dawn of the 3G era, they were the dominant handset maker. But business was becoming increasingly competitive, with upstarts like Samsung and LG eating away at their profits. The world was awash in candy bar-style phones and basic Razr flip phones, and people were getting bored. Needing to sell higher-priced devices with greater margins, Nokia became one of the more daring companies when it came to phone design. They began developing phones that focused on cameras, and others that were all about watching and recording videos. Continue reading “What Folding Phones Say About State of SmartPhones”

Apple’s Excessive Power


This post is by Continuations by Albert Wenger from Continuations by Albert Wenger


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In the last few days Apple suspended the enterprise certificates for first Facebook and then Google, rendering internal iOS apps instantly useless. Apple did so in response to revelations that both companies had used the enterprise certificates to distribute VPN apps to teenagers in order to better understand phone usage. This is apparently in violation of the enterprise certificate license.

Some people have cheered Apple’s actions as not only justified but appropriate sanctions on Facebook and Google. It would appear that Apple acted within its contractual rights and there are reasonable questions about these research efforts. In any case though Apple’s actions and their impact illustrates the extraordinary power Apple has over its devices.

I have written before that I believe this level of control is detrimental to innovation and is a source of excess rents. It has been interesting to see how the take rate in PC game Continue reading “Apple’s Excessive Power”

Apple’s Excessive Power


This post is by Continuations by Albert Wenger from Continuations by Albert Wenger


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In the last few days Apple suspended the enterprise certificates for first Facebook and then Google, rendering internal iOS apps instantly useless. Apple did so in response to revelations that both companies had used the enterprise certificates to distribute VPN apps to teenagers in order to better understand phone usage. This is apparently in violation of the enterprise certificate license.

Some people have cheered Apple’s actions as not only justified but appropriate sanctions on Facebook and Google. It would appear that Apple acted within its contractual rights and there are reasonable questions about these research efforts. In any case though Apple’s actions and their impact illustrates the extraordinary power Apple has over its devices.

I have written before that I believe this level of control is detrimental to innovation and is a source of excess rents. It has been interesting to see how the take rate in PC game Continue reading “Apple’s Excessive Power”

So what can Apple do next?


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Rollable Television. Foldable Television. MicroLED TVs. Modular TV. Big TV. Bigger and Bigger TV. It is CES time, and it doesn’t surprise me that all the major consumer electronics players are talking about televisions (amongst other things.) I mean what can bring more oohs-and-aahs than television screens with high definition video in a dark room filled with media needing to file something — anything. But the question is for how long we will need this big screen? And what will Apple do about it?

I am always amazed by this display of displays — mostly because I am a television heretic. In 2006, when we launched NewTeeVee, I cut the cord and went off linear television. Ten years later, I decided that the big screen in my apartment that hadn’t been turned on for about four years needed to go to the recycling plant.

Over the past five years,

Photo by Martin Sanchez on Unsplash

Continue reading “So what can Apple do next?”

Dear Apple: Please Sync My Dock


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


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Someone mentioned that Apple stock is having a difficult time right now, along with their Q4 performance, China strategy, and “let’s just raise the price on iPhones to make up for lower demand” strategy.

I’m not really interested in Apple stock (I don’t own any.) I’m more concerned with the Apple Dock. My MacOS Dock to be more specific.

Here’s the one from my laptop.

Here’s the one from my desktop, which is in a room about 25 feet away.

Why in the world are they different? Many things sync via iCloud already and even though the UX is obtuse to get it set up correctly across machines, when it’s finally set it, it works pretty well.

But the Dock? Seriously?

In contrast, following are the two Chrome ribbons on my two machines.

Shockingly similar, like you’d expect.

It’s fascinating to me that even in this “all cloud, all

Continue reading “Dear Apple: Please Sync My Dock”

Appleocalypse: An unfashionable view


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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We have become so accustomed to our leaders — political and corporate — lying to us, that when someone actually shares the facts, we choose to overlook them, instead of trying to read between the lines, even if there isn’t much. I am obviously talking about Appleocalypse — which arrived on the first working day of 2019. Apple CEO Tim Cook, (who unlike others didn’t hide behind a faceless press release and instead came out and) addressed the issues directly. And here is what he said that is worth noting:

While we anticipated some challenges in key emerging markets, we did not foresee the magnitude of the economic deceleration, particularly in Greater China. In fact, most of our revenue shortfall to our guidance, and over 100 percent of our year-over-year worldwide revenue decline occurred in Greater China across iPhone, Mac, and iPad. China’s economy began to slow in the Continue reading “Appleocalypse: An unfashionable view”

Chrome OS is the ultimate productivity hack & will exceed Mac OS marketshare — but can it challenge Windows?


This post is by Jason Calacanis from Calacanis.com


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Acer Chromebox CXI3

I recently replaced all but three of the Macs in our office (the ones used for video editing), with ~$800 ACER Chromeboxes and the stunning, ~$900, USB-C powered Dell 38″ monitors (model: U3818DW).

Google’s Chrome OS is an absurdly fast, stable and distraction-free operating system. Over the past seven years of its short existence, it has become world-class.

Here’s why Google has nailed it:

  1. As the world has moved to cloud-based software, running inside of browsers, the need to download client software has disappeared for almost every task. This means software startups don’t have to build clients for every desktop operating system anymore (some do, most don’t).
  2. The Chrome Browser has become the standard for cloud-based apps to be built on — because it has massive market share.
  3. Chrome Extensions are available for everything you need to do, from password management, Grammarly and advanced email with Superhuman

    Continue reading “Chrome OS is the ultimate productivity hack & will exceed Mac OS marketshare — but can it challenge Windows?”

Oh So Sweet, the iMac Pro


This post is by Om Malik from OnMyOm: Om‘s Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When companies want to send me their products, I mostly say no. I am not a reviewer — never have been. I say yes, only when I can incorporate these products into my daily flow and use them with a regular cadence. And I don’t really form an opinion — up until I have used the product for about six weeks. The new iMac Pro is one of those products that came for review and is going back today. I have not experienced sadness about sending something back, as I have with this iMac Pro.

Continue reading “Oh So Sweet, the iMac Pro”

iPhoneXsMax, now that’s a tongue twister


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




iPhoneXsMax — When I heard the name and saw it up on the stage, I shuddered. Apple’s name for its newest, biggest iPhone made one Microserf quip on Twitter: “And I thought we sucked at naming. #AppleEvent iPhone Xs Max September Refresh CTP1”

Microsoft and other technology companies were mocked by Apple veterans for their naming conventions. But now Apple is doing the same — fighting hard to come up with names that are fighting Samsung, Huawei, and many others when it comes to being tongue twisters.

It is pretty sad to see that a company that took pride in its ability to communicate clearly and succinctly about its products, the company that was able to name them with such elan and made them memorable, has come. iPhoneX(s)Max.

If they spent as much energy in their naming conventions as they put in say, their, A12 Bionic chip, then we Continue reading “iPhoneXsMax, now that’s a tongue twister”