Bitcoin is a real energy hog


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Researchers from the Technical University of Munich and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology took a look at how much energy was consumed by computers used to generate bitcoins and process transactions. Their conclusion:

in late 2018, the entire bitcoin network was responsible for 22-22.9 million tons of CO2 per year — similar to a large Western city or an entire developing country like Sri Lanka. Total global emissions of the greenhouse gas from the burning of fossil fuels were about 37 billion tons last year.  The researchers said about 68% of the computing power used to generate, or mine, bitcoins is in Asia, 17% is in Europe and 15% is in North America. [Fortune/AP]

The whole study is worth reading. (link)

The Dead at Wrigley


This post is by Jeff Carter from Points and Figures


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Never been to see the Dead before.  We are going to see them tonight at Wrigley.  I don’t own any tie-dye.  I never have had the chance to see them.  In high school and college I never had the money to go to concerts.  I can count on one hand how many I went to.  Once I got out of college, we’d go see a couple but neither of us were active concert goers.  If the Grateful Dead was in town, I usually didn’t have the time.  This will be the first major concert in Chicago since the legislature legalized pot.  I am sure there will be a lot of people heading into Lakeview with medical conditions.

The weather in Chicago has been perfectly dreadful since October 1.  Looks like it will be a nice day today.  Might even Continue reading “The Dead at Wrigley”

Thoughts on my Wedding Day


This post is by Charlie O'Donnell from This is going to be BIG...


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I’m getting married today.

At least, if she says yes.

But, assuming that all goes according to plan, I have a few thoughts on how I got here—given that dating and relationships seem to vex a lot of people.

I would say that the most important factor that went into both of us finding someone to marry was that neither one of us felt like we had to find someone to marry to be content. We both spent time developing ourselves and our lives as complete and we weren’t waiting for someone to make us whole—so we entered this relationship not as gap fillers for each other, but as two independent people who chose to be together because it was better, instead of trying to avoid being single.

You don’t need anyone to be content—but it’s very nice to meet someone you want who wants you back.

For me, winning Continue reading “Thoughts on my Wedding Day”

Women Who Venture


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


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I recently met Renata George through a referral from Katie Rae (MIT Engine CEO, previously Techstars Boston MD). Renata told me about a book she was working on called Women Who Venture and asked me if I’d write the foreword.

I was honored to be asked to do this. The foreword I wrote follows. The book is out and available now in hardcover and on the Kindle.

As an avid writer and reader, I feel that a book is a unique medium that serves a different purpose than the other written media that we consume regularly. A book can display a variety of perspectives at once, providing enough details on the subjects it explores, while giving us space to contemplate.

When Renata George told me she was going to write a book about Women Who Venture, featuring around a hundred female investors of different generations, I immediately said I’d be

Continue reading “Women Who Venture”

20VC: Lime CEO Brad Bao on How Lime Assess The Micro-Mobility Landscape and Competition Today, What It Takes To Launch and Win A New City & Why Lime Have Spent $0 on Marketing To Date


This post is by Harry Stebbings from The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch


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Brad Bao is the Co-Founder & CEO @ Lime, the startup that provides distribution of shared scooters, bikes and transit vehicles, with the aim to reduce dependence on personal automobiles for short distance transportation. To date they have raised over $775m in funding from the likes of Andreessen Horowitz, GV, IVP, Uber, Fifth Wall, GGV, Atomico and Bain Capital Ventures just to name a few. As for Brad, prior to founding Lime he was Managing Partner @ Kinzon Capital for close to 6 years and before that spent an incredible 8 years at Tencent in numerous different roles including VP of Business Development for Tencent Games and General manager for Tencent’s US branch where he was responsible for Tencent’s US operations.

In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

1.) How Brad made his way into the world of technology with Tencent, how that led to the world of investing Continue reading “20VC: Lime CEO Brad Bao on How Lime Assess The Micro-Mobility Landscape and Competition Today, What It Takes To Launch and Win A New City & Why Lime Have Spent $0 on Marketing To Date”

Quickly Unpacking The Looker And Tableau Acquisitions


This post is by Semil Shah from Haystack.vc


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Normally, I like to pounce on these big acquisitions quickly with some quick analysis, but big M&A in tech is happening too fast, and it’s graduation season for the toddlers, and family is in town, so for this installment of the blog, we will talk about both Looker and Tableau together, as they’re in the same space.

So without further ado, here are my quick takeaways from both acquisitions:

1/ “Not Another BI Startup?” This phrase is a common refrain among many startup investors. And, there is some truth to it — there are plenty of “BI tools” and “analytics/dashboard” companies that were started and funded. It was a red ocean. Fast-forward to June 2019, and two BI companies were purchased for close to $18B combined. Of course, Tableau and Looker do much more than just “BI” but I’m sure there are a number of early founding teams and Continue reading “Quickly Unpacking The Looker And Tableau Acquisitions”

Stretch Responsibilities


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org


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Are you being pushed outside your comfort zone? Dan and Alison answer your questions with the help of Jerry Colonna, a professional coach and a former venture capitalist. They talk through what to do when you don’t feel qualified for your new role, you’re covering an absentee boss’s responsibilities, or you have been assigned to lead a team but haven’t been given formal power.

The Bing of Maps


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Seven years ago, Apple decided that it’d had enough of using Google’s mapping data. They realized that maps and mapping services were so strategic that they couldn’t really afford to depend on a smartphone rival. So, they began building their own, and in September 2012, the company launched Apple Maps. And if I am being honest, the program has always been akin to that baby face that only a mother can love.

When it launched, Apple Maps was widely panned for being inaccurate and missing key information. Google launched its own dedicated Google Maps for iOS three months later and has never looked back. Apple, on the other hand, has spent billions on Apple Maps in an effort to build a more accurate and rich experience. Yet, in many dense locations, like San Francisco Bay Area or the Big Apple, it still performs like the kid who got into the private school because their grandfather’s name was on one of the buildings. On sheer merit, Google Maps was and still is better. Continue reading “The Bing of Maps”

Cloudflare’s Galileo Project Turns Five


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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Our portfolio company Cloudflare provides a suite of mission critical security services, and increasingly other services too, in the cloud to their customers. Among the most well known of these security services is DDOS protection (aka denial of service attack protection). A DDOS attack is a massive traffic burst aimed at a website to take of offline.

Among the most vulnerable and attacked websites are those belonging to non-profits and other organizations doing work that upsets those in power.

So Project Galileo is Cloudflare’s effort to provide security services to these sorts of organizations for free so they can stay online and continue to do their work.

And Galileo turns five years old this week.

Matthew Prince, Cloudflare’s CEO and co-founder, wrote this blog post yesterday celebrating five years of Galileo and he explains why this is so important to Cloudflare, the Internet, and the world.

Every Lie We Tell Incurs a Debt to the Truth


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


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I watched HBO’s Chernobyl the past few nights. I finished it last night, took a deep breath, and said out loud to myself, “that was spectacular.”

One of the final quotes that stuck with me is the title of this post. The full quote is “Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later that debt is paid.”

Read it again. “Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later that debt is paid.” Pause and ponder it. Think about our current world. Let the line linger a bit in your mind.

Now, watch the following ten-minute video for the comparison of Chernobyl to real historical footage. It’s incredibly powerful to watch this after you’ve watched Chernobyl, but may be even more powerful to watch it prior to watching the miniseries, which some are calling a docudrama. While some

Continue reading “Every Lie We Tell Incurs a Debt to the Truth”

Twitter is Big in Japan


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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In the U.S., Twitter has been dogged by the perception that it’s a non-intuitive platform, more suited for public figures, entertainers, and journalists. But in Japan, it has mass appeal.

Twitter seems to have found a place in Japan. If you read the story, you realize it is cultural. People preferred to be anonymous and focus on their niche interests, and are happy to create multiple accounts. The usage is pretty high, as well. No wonder the Japanese advertisers aren’t afraid to spend on Twitter Japan —  $136 million last year. The good news can’t mask the same problems that make it a toxic cauldron of abuse, hatred, bullying, and trolling. Fun Fact: Japanese users used the “Like” button to save tweets to read later. And Twitter came up with the bookmarking feature.

Climate Change and What We Do About It (If Anything)


This post is by Jeff Carter from Points and Figures


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Listen to this podcast.   It’s super interesting.  The Climate Change debate has devolved into two factions.   Part of it is the “believers” have denounced the “deniers” as anti-science and Luddites.  The Climate Change people I hear in the media, and run into in my personal circles have a fanatical religious belief about it.  The only path is to use wind or solar energy and end fossil fuels, full stop.

The politicians traipsing through Iowa right now are trying to scare everyone.  As if the reason farmers can’t get their crop in this year is climate change.  It’s been extremely rainy and cold.  They forget that years like this happen from time to time and have all through history.

Lomborg deconstructs the issue through the use of really good data.  He’s not “for or against” climate change.  For example, we know Continue reading “Climate Change and What We Do About It (If Anything)”