The 70 Books I Read This Year

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers” — Harry S. Truman

Your brain is your largest muscle (at least for most people). You need to work it out regularly. Most of the people I admire most, in both business and life in general, are voracious readers, and I try to emulate them. Most of the books I read are recommended by people I follow (tweets, interviews, podcasts etc.) so I’m paying it forward with my 2019 list.

My Top Ten

1. Thinking, Fast and Slow / Daniel Kahneman

You’ve heard of this book. If you haven’t read it yet, you must.

2. Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge / Edward O. Wilson

I’m going to have to re-read this one a few times. E.O Wilson is brilliant, his knowledge is expansive, and this is a book about the interconnections between different areas of thought and study. I felt parts of my brain

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Strategies for Managing Day-to-Day Anxiety

Anxiety can affect so many aspects of our work – from how we make decisions to how we receive feedback and behave in meetings. In the final episode of Season 1, host Morra Aarons-Mele and former clinical psychologist Alice Boyes discuss the daily strategies and habits that can help to manage your anxiety at work.

Momemtum Monday – Add A Little Froth To My Nasdaq Latte

As a reminder, Marketsmith (by Investor’s Business Daily) is now a sponsor of the weekly show. All the charts you have been seeing in the videos and will continue to see are from Marketsmith. They are offering my readers a three week trial for $19.95. Click this link if you would like to try it out.

Happy Monday everyone.

Ivanhoff and I did our tour around the markets and globe looking for momentum old and new. There are a lot of interesting setups and a lot of trends that are long in the tooth and due for a rest. You can watch or listen right here.

The reason I mentioned froth in today’s title is Orange Julius, our ‘Tweeter In Chief’ is absolutely giddy about the stock market. While not as good an indicator as when he hates the stock market, it might be a clue that a stock

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Chapter 2 of Ansi Common Lisp

Chapter 1 of Ansi Common Lisp

Real Mentorship Starts with Company Culture, Not Formal Programs

Talent development is an informal, day-to-day process.

The Top Sustainability Stories of 2019

From climate protests to vegan burgers.

20VC: Inside The Acquisition Decision-Making Process at Cisco, How To Measure True Success in M&A Evaluation & Why By Not Speaking To Corp Dev Teams You Are Closing The Door On The Biggest Potential Accelerator To Your Business with Rob Salvagno, VP of Co


This post is by Harry Stebbings from The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Rob Salvagno is VP of Corporate Development and Cisco Investments at Cisco, where he is responsible for leading all M&A efforts as well as managing Cisco’s strategic venture capital which invests hundreds of millions of dollars annually. At Cisco, Rob led the $1.2 billion acquisition of Meraki, one of the most successful platform acquisitions in Cisco’s history, and the $3.7 billion acquisition of AppDynamics, cementing Cisco’s place in the business intelligence, analytics and IT operations market. Most recently, Rob engineered the $2.3 billion acquisition of Duo, the leading provider of unified access security and multi-factor authentication delivered through the cloud. Prior to the world of M&A, Rob was a technology investment banker at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette.

In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

1.) How Rob made his way from investment banking to leading the M&A and venture activity for one of the world’s largest tech players of the last decade?

2.) How do M&A teams like to get to know startups that they could invest in or acquire? How does Rob like to work with the venture ecosystem? How does Rob think on Paul Graham’s comment of “do not talk to corp dev”? What are the nuances here? How does it differ for consumer vs enterprise? 

3.) How does Rob define true success when it comes to M&A evaluation? Should corp dev be strategy first or transaction first? What have been Rob’s biggest lessons on successful integration? Where do so many go wrong Continue reading “20VC: Inside The Acquisition Decision-Making Process at Cisco, How To Measure True Success in M&A Evaluation & Why By Not Speaking To Corp Dev Teams You Are Closing The Door On The Biggest Potential Accelerator To Your Business with Rob Salvagno, VP of Co”

20VC: Inside The Acquisition Decision-Making Process at Cisco, How To Measure True Success in M&A Evaluation & Why By Not Speaking To Corp Dev Teams You Are Closing The Door On The Biggest Potential Accelerator To Your Business with Rob Salvagno, VP of Co

Rob Salvagno is VP of Corporate Development and Cisco Investments at Cisco, where he is responsible for leading all M&A efforts as well as managing Cisco’s strategic venture capital which invests hundreds of millions of dollars annually. At Cisco, Rob led the $1.2 billion acquisition of Meraki, one of the most successful platform acquisitions in Cisco’s history, and the $3.7 billion acquisition of AppDynamics, cementing Cisco’s place in the business intelligence, analytics and IT operations market. Most recently, Rob engineered the $2.3 billion acquisition of Duo, the leading provider of unified access security and multi-factor authentication delivered through the cloud. Prior to the world of M&A, Rob was a technology investment banker at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette.

In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

1.) How Rob made his way from investment banking to leading the M&A and venture activity for one of the world’s largest tech players Continue reading “20VC: Inside The Acquisition Decision-Making Process at Cisco, How To Measure True Success in M&A Evaluation & Why By Not Speaking To Corp Dev Teams You Are Closing The Door On The Biggest Potential Accelerator To Your Business with Rob Salvagno, VP of Co”

Where are they now: Mithril Capital

The firm co-founded by Peter Thiel has seen seven of 11 team members depart in the past four years. Here’s what they’re up to now.

Indian tech startups raised a record $14.5B in 2019

Indian tech startups have never had it so good.

Local tech startups in the nation raised $14.5 billion in 2019, beating their previous best of $10.5 billion last year, according to research firm Tracxn .

Tech startups in India this year participated in 1,185 financing rounds — 459 of those were Series A or later rounds — from 817 investors.

Early stage startups — those participating in angel or pre-Series A financing round — raised $6.9 billion this year, easily surpassing last year’s $3.3 billion figure, according to a report by venture debt firm InnoVen Capital.

According to InnoVen’s report, early stage startups that have typically struggled to attract investors saw a 22% year-over-year increase in the number of financing deals they took part in this year. Cumulatively, at $2.6 million, their valuation also increased by 15% from last year.

Also in 2019, 128 startups in

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The Market is Huge! Revisiting the Big Market Delusion


This post is by Aswath Damodaran from Musings on Markets

For the high-profile IPOs that have reached the market in 2019, with apologies to Charles Dickens for stealing and mangling his words, it has been the best and the worst of years. On the one hand, you have seen companies like Uber and Slack, each less than a decade old, trading at market capitalizations in the tens of billions of dollars, while working on unformed business models and reporting losses. On the other, many of these new listings have not only had disappointing openings, but have seen their market prices drop in the months after. In September 2019, we did see an implosion in the value of WeWork, another company that started the listing process with lots of promise and a pricing to match, but melted down from a combination of self-inflicted wounds and public market scrutiny. While these companies were very different in their business models (or lack of them), they shared one thing in common. When asked to justify their high pricing, they all pointed to how big the potential markets for their products/services were, captured in their assessments of market size. Uber estimated its total accessible market (TAM) to be in excess of $ 6 trillion, Slack’s judgment was that it had 5 million plus prospective clients across the world and WeWork’s argument was that the commercial real estate market was massive. In short, they were telling big market stories, just as PC makers were in the 1980s, dot com firms in the 1990s and social media Continue reading “The Market is Huge! Revisiting the Big Market Delusion”

The Market is Huge! Revisiting the Big Market Delusion

For the high-profile IPOs that have reached the market in 2019, with apologies to Charles Dickens for stealing and mangling his words, it has been the best and the worst of years. On the one hand, you have seen companies like Uber and Slack, each less than a decade old, trading at market capitalizations in the tens of billions of dollars, while working on unformed business models and reporting losses. On the other, many of these new listings have not only had disappointing openings, but have seen their market prices drop in the months after. In September 2019, we did see an implosion in the value of WeWork, another company that started the listing process with lots of promise and a pricing to match, but melted down from a combination of self-inflicted wounds and public market scrutiny. While these companies were very different in their business models (or lack of

Continue reading “The Market is Huge! Revisiting the Big Market Delusion”

Christmas Presence [Flickr]

jurvetson posted a photo:

Christmas Presence

My daughter was very chillaxed as she entered the holidays knowing she was accepted by her top college pick. So proud of her!

Casting Magic :moon: Spells [Flickr]

jurvetson posted a photo:

Casting Magic :moon: Spells

We are smitten.
Baby Luna’s first trip to HMB.

Casting Magic :moon: Spells

jurvetson posted a photo:

Casting Magic :moon: Spells

We are smitten.
Baby Luna’s first trip to HMB.

Christmas Presence

jurvetson posted a photo:

Christmas Presence

My daughter was very chillaxed as she entered the holidays knowing she was accepted by her top college pick. So proud of her!

a morning mood [Flickr]

jurvetson posted a photo:

a morning mood

We spent a magic hour this way at wake up time.

Blissed out with our bedside book — Clean Meat— which tells the formation stories of Memphis Meats, Perfect Day and other pioneers.

a morning mood

jurvetson posted a photo:

a morning mood

We spent a magic hour this way at wake up time.

Blissed out with our bedside book — Clean Meat— which tells the formation stories of Memphis Meats, Perfect Day and other pioneers.

Our Neural Networks [Flickr]

jurvetson posted a photo:

Our Neural Networks

Hers has 10x as many synapses as mine, and twice the energy burn.

Much of the human brain’s power derives from its massive synaptic interconnectivity. Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute observed that across species, synapses/neuron fan-out grows as a power law with brain mass. — from my little WIRED piece, Celebrate the Child-like Mind.

Genevieve is reading one of my favorite books, Allison Gopnik’s Scientitst in the Crib: "Babies are just plain smarter than we are, at least if being smart means being able to learn something new…. They think, draw conclusions, make predictions, look for explanations and even do experiments…. In fact, scientists are successful precisely because they emulate what children do naturally."

Babies signal their interest in things by where they focus their gaze, and that shifts over time as their brain develops. This observable locus of attention is a

Continue reading “Our Neural Networks [Flickr]”