Category: u.s.

Decarbonization Targets for the Largest U.S. Utilities



The following content is sponsored by the National Public Utility Council

Decarbonization Targets for the Largest U.S. Utilities

The U.S. recently rejoined the Paris Climate Agreement and decarbonization is back on the minds of government officials and companies alike.

Though every sector plays a major role on the path to net zero carbon emissions, none are as impactful as the energy sector. In 2016, almost three-quarters of global GHG emissions came from energy consumption. With organizations looking to either curb energy consumption or transition to cleaner forms of energy, the pressure is on utilities to decarbonize and offer green alternatives.

How are U.S. utilities responding?

This infographic from the National Public Utility Council highlights the decarbonization targets of the largest investor-owned and public U.S. utilities.

U.S. Utility Decarbonization Targets Through 2035

The American energy sector has many players, but the largest utilities account for the bulk of production.

For each state, we looked at the largest investor-owned and public electric utilities by retail sales as tracked by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Decarbonization targets were taken from each utility’s stated goals or sustainability report.

After narrowing down from 3,328 different entities and subsidiaries, the final list of 60 utilities accounted for 60% of U.S. energy sales in 2019 at just under 1.93 trillion MWh (megawatt hours).

Many companies on the list have multiple goals spread across different timeframes, but they can be grouped into a few distinct categories:

  • Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) or greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions: (Read more...)

Mapped: The Top 10 Billionaire Cities


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


top 10 cities for billionaires

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Mapped: The Top 10 Billionaire Cities in 2020

In 2020, the world gained 493 new billionaires—that’s one every 17 hours.

For the last seven years, New York City has been home to more billionaires than any other city in the world. However, last year marked a monumental shift in the status quo.

Beijing has unseated the Big Apple, and is now home to 100 billionaires. That’s one more billionaire than the 99 living in New York City.

Today’s map uses data from Forbes to display the top 10 cities that house the most billionaires.

Where do the Most Billionaires Live?

The richest of the rich are quite concentrated in cities, but some cities seem to best suit the billionaire lifestyle. Here’s a breakdown of the top 10 billionaire capitals and the collective net worth of all the ultra wealthy that live there.

RankCityRegionNumber of BillionairesNet Worth of the City's Billionaires
#1Beijing?? Asia100$484.3B
#2New York City?? North America99$560.5B
#3Hong Kong?? Asia80$448.4B
#4Moscow?? Europe (Read more...)

Who Americans Spend Their Time With, by Age


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


Who Americans Spend Their Time With, by Age

If the global pandemic has taught us anything, it is that humans truly are social creatures. Most of us need community and connection to thrive.

But when people are not socially distancing and limiting their contacts, who do they choose to spend time with?

This interactive chart from Our World in Data reveals who Americans spend the most daily minutes with at different ages of their life, based on data collected between 2009 and 2019 through the Time Use Survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Adolescence to Adulthood

In the average American’s teenage years, they spend most of their time alone and with their family. This makes sense, as the majority of people under 18 still live in a home with their nuclear family unit, meaning parents and siblings.

Jumping forward to a person’s early adulthood, 25-year-olds spend an average of 275 minutes per day alone, and 199 minutes with coworkers. This aligns with people in their twenties beginning to enter the workforce.

By age 35, people are still spending the most time with themselves, at 263 minutes per day. However, time spent combined with children and partners, the runner-ups, adds up to 450 minutes or around 7.5 hours a day.

AgeMost Time SpentSecondThird
15Family - 267 MinutesAlone - 193 MinutesFriends - 109 Minutes
25Alone - 275 MinutesCoworkers - 199 MinutesPartner - 121 Minutes
35Alone - 263 Minutes (Read more...)

One Year In: Did People Save More or Less During the Pandemic?


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


pandemic saving rates

The Briefing

  • Increased saving rates were a common trend across many countries during the global pandemic.
  • At its highest point the U.S. had a personal savings rate of 33%.

One Year In: A Look at Saving Rates During the Pandemic

While working hours were reduced across the globe and many lost their jobs entirely, personal saving rates actually increased throughout the pandemic in many countries.

A personal saving rate is calculated as the ratio of personal saving to disposable personal income. Here’s a look at the U.S.’ personal saving rate over 2020.

DateU.S. Savings Rate
January 20207.6%
February 20208.3%
March 202012.9%
April 202033.7%
May 202024.7%
June 202019.0%
July 202018.4%
August 202014.6%
September 202014.1%
October 202013.2%
November 202012.5%
December 202013.4%
January 202120.5%

The U.S.’ personal saving rate skyrocketed in April to more than 30%. After a dip near the end of 2020, the rate has jumped back up again to around 20% in January 2021.

With the most recent data from September 2020, many European countries’ savings rates were up, as well—the highest rate occurred in the Netherlands at 24%. Japan and the UK followed a similar trend as well, at 22% and 28% respectively.

The Pandemic Piggy Bank

Personal saving rates tend to increase during recessions and, more generally, either increase because of reduced consumption or a boost in income.

Without the same access to restaurants, shopping, and travel, it is somewhat unsurprising that (Read more...)

Visualizing Net Worth by Age in America


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


net worth by age

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Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.
When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.
Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

The Briefing

  • The age group with the highest average net worth in the U.S. is the 65-74 group, with $1.22 million in 2019 dollars.
  • There is a significant gap between median and mean (average) net worth in nearly every age category, suggesting that mean values are skewed upwards by outliers.

Visualizing Net Worth by Age in America

Calculating the net worth of individuals often seems like the kind of math reserved only for the richest people in the world like Elon Musk or Jack Ma. But as the proverbial pie gets bigger, the net worth of the average American household gets bigger as well.

This chart uses data from the U.S. Federal Reserve Bulletin to reveal median and average household net worth across different age categories in 2019.

Average vs. Median Net Worth

A person’s net worth is a sum of their assets and liabilities. Here’s a closer look at net worth by age in the U.S.

AgeMedian Net Worth 2019Average Net Worth 2019Difference
Younger than 35$13,900$76,300>5x
35-44$91,300$436,200 (Read more...)

Visualizing America’s Entrepreneurial Spirit During COVID-19


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


entrepreneurial spirit in America

Mapped: America’s Entrepreneurial Spirit During COVID-19

Despite the risks of opening a business during a global pandemic, new data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals that the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in the United States.

In total, there were 492,133 new business applications in January 2021—an increase of over 73% year-over-year (YoY).

The region with the highest growth rate was the South at 84% with more than 220,000 new business applications in the region in January of this year. Mississippi had the highest percent increase at 164%, with over 6,000 new applications in January 2021.

Here’s a closer look at the number of total applications by state and region:

Notably, in the last month or so, there has been a sharp increase in the number of business applications, bouncing back from a dip between July and December 2020.

The growth rate from December 2020 to January 2021 stood at 42.6%, with the biggest change happening in the Midwest, where applications have gone up 48.6%. Here’s a look at the biggest changes in applications by region since December 2020:

RegionNumber of Applications in January 2021Percentage Change from December 2020
Midwest85,50348.6%
Northeast77,91047.9%
West103,86140.5%
South224,85939.6%

Note: Business applications are measured by (Read more...)

The 10 Largest U.S. Tech IPOs in History


This post is by Marcus Lu from Visual Capitalist


Largest Tech IPOs

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Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.
When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.
Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

The Briefing

  • The IPOs of Airbnb, DoorDash, and Snowflake raised over $3 billion each
  • This secures their spot among the 10 largest U.S. tech IPOs in history

U.S. Tech IPOs: Three Stocks from 2020 Break into the Top Ten

2020 was an eventful year for IPOs despite the economic hardships caused by COVID-19. Over $300 billion was raised in U.S. equity markets, with companies from the tech sector generating a significant amount of hype.

Among these companies were Airbnb, DoorDash, and Snowflake, all of which raised over $3 billion. To put this into perspective, let’s look at the 10 biggest U.S. tech IPOs of all time.

The Top 10 U.S. Tech IPOs

Airbnb, DoorDash, and Snowflake muscled their way into the top 10, raising a combined $10.3 billion dollars in the second half of 2020.

RankCompanyIPO DateAmount Raised (USD billions)
1FacebookMay 2012$16.0
2UberMay 2019$8.1
3Agere SystemsMarch 2001$4.1
4SnapMarch 2017$3.9
5AirbnbDecember 2020$3.5
6SnowflakeSeptember 2020$3.4
7DoorDash (Read more...)