Category: Snap

Musk or Not, Twitter CEO Needs To Go


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


person holding a card with twitter text
Photo by Oleg Magni on Pexels.com

Elon Musk, currently the richest guy in the world, has decided he wants to buy Twitter. He has made an unsolicited offer to buy the company that would value the San Francisco-based social media company at over $43 billion. It is not clear whether he will be successful, but one thing is clear — in less than a month, he has turned Twitter into a stock market piñata. 

If not Musk, then someone from the private equity industry or one of the big technology companies — most likely Microsoft, given their cozy relationship with the U.S. government — will try and buy a company that, at best, has been a chronic underperformer. The company will be subject to many upheavals in the months to come. And the only real question we should be asking is: Does Twitter have the right captain to navigate the company through the stormy seas. Is the CEO Parag Agarwal, who replaced Jack Dorsey, up to snuff? 

Agarwal spent many years at the research divisions of Microsoft & Yahoo, including a stint at AT&T Labs, before joining Twitter in 2011 as a software engineer. He rose to the rank of the chief technology officer before he was named Dorsey’s replacement in November of 2021. Sure, Agarwal was at the company for a decade. So I will give him full points for understanding the company’s product and underlying technology. But is he the right leader? Is he the person with the (Read more...)

Musk or Not, Twitter CEO Needs To Go


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


person holding a card with twitter text
Photo by Oleg Magni on Pexels.com

Elon Musk, currently the richest guy in the world, has decided he wants to buy Twitter. He has made an unsolicited offer to buy the company that would value the San Francisco-based social media company at over $43 billion. It is not clear whether he will be successful, but one thing is clear — in less than a month, he has turned Twitter into a stock market piñata. 

If not Musk, then someone from the private equity industry or one of the big technology companies — most likely Microsoft, given their cozy relationship with the U.S. government — will try and buy a company that, at best, has been a chronic underperformer. The company will be subject to many upheavals in the months to come. And the only real question we should be asking is: Does Twitter have the right captain to navigate the company through the stormy seas. Is the CEO Parag Agarwal, who replaced Jack Dorsey, up to snuff? 

Agarwal spent many years at the research divisions of Microsoft & Yahoo, including a stint at AT&T Labs, before joining Twitter in 2011 as a software engineer. He rose to the rank of the chief technology officer before he was named Dorsey’s replacement in November of 2021. Sure, Agarwal was at the company for a decade. So I will give him full points for understanding the company’s product and underlying technology. But is he the right leader? Is he the person with the (Read more...)

From Amazon to Zoom: What Happens in an Internet Minute In 2021?


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


internet minute 2021

From Amazon to Zoom: An Internet Minute In 2021

In our everyday lives, not much may happen in a minute. But when gauging the depth of internet activity occurring all at once, it can be extraordinary. Today, around five billion internet users exist across the globe.

This annual infographic from Domo captures just how much activity is going on in any given minute, and the amount of data being generated by users. To put it mildly, there’s a lot.

The Internet Minute

At the heart of the world’s digital activity are the everyday services and applications that have become staples in our lives. Collectively, these produce unimaginable quantities of user activity and associated data.

Here are just some of the key figures of what happens in a minute:

  • Amazon customers spend $283,000
  • 12 million people send an iMessage
  • 6 million people shop online
  • Instacart users spend $67,000
  • Slack users send 148,000 messages
  • Microsoft Teams connects 100,000 users
  • YouTube users stream 694,000 videos
  • Facebook Live receives 44 million views
  • Instagram users share 65,000 photos
  • Tiktok users watch 167 million videos

As these facts show, Big Tech companies have quite the influence over our lives. That influence is becoming difficult to ignore, and draws increasing media and political attention. And some see this attention as a plausible explanation for why Facebook changed their name—to dissociate from their old one in the process.

One tangible measure of this influence is the massive amount of revenue Big Tech companies bring in. To get (Read more...)

What does the Internet & Zoom have to do with Nam June Paik?


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Self-portrait, made with Paik’s Zen for Film. Made with iPhone 12 Pro Max.

I recently saw the work of Nam June Paik, currently being exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (MoMA.) 

If you are unfamiliar with him, Paik has been called the “father of video art.” He was born in 1932 in what is now South Korea, lived in Japan, Germany, and the United States. He died in 2006. I have only read about Paik in the magazines but never really experienced his work in person — a shame, considering how much of his work is at the core of modern visual and interactive post-Internet life. 

Take, for instance, his 1968 creation, The Electric Chair. The art piece comprises a CCTV camera pointing down at a chair with a television under the transparent seat. The TV displays the live video feed from the camera. Paik was pointing to a future where video would become a deeply enmeshed part of our lives in creating this work. Looking around, whether it is TikTok, Snap, or Zoom, the Electric Chair is all around us. 

The Chair is just one of the many pieces of work he created that pushed his core belief in an electronic superhighway. He translated that idea into an art installation “constructed of 336 televisions, 50 DVD players, 3,750 feet of cable, and 575 feet of multicolored neon tubing.” Sadly, this piece of art isn’t available for us to see here in San Francisco. For me, (Read more...)

Synchronicity


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


A connecting principle
Linked to the invisible
Almost imperceptible
Something inexpressible
Science insusceptible
Logic so inflexible
Causally connectible
Nothing is invincible
Synchronicity, The Police, 1983

Techmeme, reminded me that it has been ten years since the launch of Google+, the doomed-from-the-start social networking effort by Google, and a supposed competitor to Facebook. I was skeptical of the service at the launch, to put it mildly, but I totally understood why Google had to take a swing at it. Looking back, Google managed to deliver on the “why” of its goals, but not the “how.” 

Today, search is not just about pages, but also about people and the relevance of the information to them…Google needs to adapt, and getting social and location signals is important for the company. Search is now search relevant to you in the context of your world. 

My argument (even before the release of Google+) was that the only way for Google to beat Facebook was through Android, its mobile platform. Social networks were (and still are) all about communication, and communication tools are necessary for cementing relationships. Google, I thought, could create a platform of interactions that might give it a significant leg up on Facebook. 

To me, interactions are synchronous, are highly personal, are location-aware, and allow the sharing of experiences, whether it’s photographs, video streams or simply smiley faces. Interactions are supposed to mimic the feeling of actually being there. Interactions are about enmeshing the virtual with the physical.

Interactions were (and (Read more...)

Forget medicine, in the future you might get prescribed apps



Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

Natasha and Danny and Alex and Grace were all here to chat through the week’s biggest tech happenings. This time around we had whatever passes for a quiet week as far as news volume. But that still meant we had to cut stuff and move the rest around. But, once we got done editing the notes doc down, here’s what was left over: