Category: salary

Charted: The Working Hours of Americans at Different Income Levels


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Charting showing average working hours of rich and poor in America

The Actual Working Hours of Different Income Levels

Do you really need to work 100-hour weeks for success?

In 2021, America’s top 10% of income earners made at least $129,181 a year—more than double the average individual income across the country.

When looking at differences between income groups, there are many preconceived notions about the work involved. But what are the actual average working hours for different income groups?

This graphic by Ruben Berge Mathisen uses the latest U.S. Census data to show the average working hours of Americans at different income levels.

Comparing Average Work Weeks

The data used for this graphic comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s May 2022 Current Population Survey, which surveys more than 8,000 Americans from various socioeconomic backgrounds.

Importantly, the data reflects the average work hours that respondents in each income percentile “actually” work each week, and not what’s on their contract. This also includes overtime, other jobs, or side gigs.

According to the survey data, America’s top 10% income percentile works 4.4 hours more each week than those in the bottom 10%. And in surveys across other countries, though with hundreds of respondents instead of thousands, the discrepancy was similar:

Mapped: The Salary You Need to Buy a Home in 50 U.S. Cities


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


Mapped: The Salary You Need to Buy a Home in 50 U.S. Cities

This is the Salary You Need to Buy a Home in 50 U.S. Cities

Depending on where you live, owning a home may seem like a far off dream or it could be fairly realistic. In New York City, for example, a person needs to be making at least six figures to buy a home, but in Cleveland you could do it with just over $45,000 a year.

This visual, using data from Home Sweet Home, maps out the annual salary you’d need for home ownership in 50 different U.S. cities.

Note: The map above refers to entire metro areas and uses Q1 2022 data on median home prices. The necessary salary was calculated by the source, looking at the base cost of principal, interest, property tax, and homeowner’s insurance.

Home Ownership Across the U.S.

San Jose is by far the most expensive city when it comes to purchasing a home. A person would need to earn over $330,000 annually to pay off the mortgage at a monthly rate of $7,718.

Here’s a closer look at the numbers:

RankMetro AreaMedian Home PriceSalary Needed
#1San Jose$1,875,000$330,758
#2San Francisco$1,380,000$249,685
#3San Diego$905,000$166,828
#4Los Angeles$792,500$149,127
#5Seattle$746,200$140,768
#6Boston$639,000$130,203
#7New York City$578,100$129,459
#8Denver$662,200$121,888
#9Austin$540,700$114,679
#10Washington, D.C.$553,000$110,327
#11Portland$570,500$109,267
#12Riverside/San Bernardino$560,000$106,192
#13Sacramento$545,000$105,934
#14Miami$530,000$103,744
(Read more...)

Start-Up Founder Compensation Survey


This post is by Miguel Pinho from Seedcamp


A data-driven deep dive into founder salary and equity, from Pre Seed to Series A

Welcome to the first edition of the Start-Up Founder Compensation Survey – powered by Graphy.

At Seedcamp, this question comes up time and time again and we struggled to find any reliable data. As a consequence, the purpose of this survey is to provide a clear set of results, based on peer data, absent of bias, for free. A starting point for founders to construct a compelling case to empower their position, especially for those from diverse backgrounds, not an investor-led set of guidelines. More #powertothefounder

I would like to extend thanks and congratulations to Graphy, a Seedcamp company, for the awesome charts and their recent launch!

I would also like to thank the other funds who contributed their data outside of the Seedcamp Nation to help provide insight, namely Anthemis, Notion Capital, and BackedVC (if anyone else’s companies contributed please let me know and I’ll add you here!)

Please read!

We collected a number of variables from the companies that submitted the survey including: Annual Salary; Equity % Held; Company Revenue; Last Round Type; Last Round Size; Number of Co-Founders; Number of Employees; Years in Operation; Geographical Location (HQ); Office Status (Office, Hybrid, Remote)

Please find the forex rates used at the time of generating the charts here.

We have spent countless hours digesting all this data and comparing and contrasting these variables together on hundreds of charts. The conclusion was (Read more...)

Our investment in Figures’ €1.7M round to help startups manage their salary policy


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp


Figures co-founders Virgile Raingeard and Bastien Formery

One of the most frequent questions we get from our founders at Seedcamp is ‘how much should I be paying for xx role?’ Until now, navigating startup salaries across Europe has been a total black box, with companies constantly struggling to get cohesive benchmarking data and understand how to position themselves to be competitive in the market, without bankrupting themselves in the process.

To help solve this massive problem, we are delighted to lead investment into Virgile and Bastien, co-founders of Figures, as they set out to help startups manage their salary policy as they scale their compensation platform across multiple European countries. We are impressed by what the team has built in just a year, with20 customers already in France and Germany including the likes of Qonto, PayFit, BackMarket, and JobTeaser who rely on the Figures platform to define their salary policy. Given the success of its solution, Figures has announced an acceleration of its development in Europe (Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, Benelux, Scandinavian countries) and aims to have 700 European customers within a year.

In a market under high tension, in which compensation is a key component to attracting and retaining the best talents, Figures’ solution has already helped more than 220 start-ups to review their salary policy. Figures is currently the only platform providing access to real salary levels in the start-up market, with data filterable by company size, industry, funding, role, and location.

With a strong (Read more...)

The 20 Fastest Growing Jobs in the Next Decade


This post is by Jenna Ross from Visual Capitalist


Fastest Growing Jobs in the Next Decade

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How is the Job Market Shifting Over the Next Decade?

The employment landscape is constantly shifting. While agricultural jobs played a big role in the 19th century, a large portion of U.S. jobs today are in administration, sales, or transportation. So how can job seekers identify the fastest growing jobs of the future?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects there will be 11.9 million new jobs created from 2020 to 2030, an overall growth rate of 7.7%. However, some jobs have a growth rate that far exceeds this level. In this graphic, we use BLS data to show the fastest growing jobs—and fastest declining jobs—and how much they each pay.

The Top 20 Fastest Growing Jobs

We used the dataset that excludes occupations with above average cyclical recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, jobs such as motion picture projectionists, ticket takers, and restaurant cooks were removed. Once these exclusions were made, the resulting list reflects long-term structural growth.

Here are the fastest growing jobs from 2020 to 2030, along with the number of (Read more...)