Category: recycled materials

The Biggest Carbon Emitters, By Sector


This post is by Tessa Di Grandi from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Northstar Clean Technologies

The Biggest Carbon Emitters, By Sector

It’s no secret that greenhouse gas emissions need to decrease drastically in order to fight the effects of climate change.

As countries across the globe ramp up efforts to reduce global warming, every industry needs to do its part. So who’s lagging and who’s leading?

Although often less discussed, the manufacturing and construction sector is a large contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions.

The above graphic from Northstar Clean Technologies takes a look at the biggest contributors by sector in relation to greenhouse gas emissions.

Breakdown Of Emissions

The manufacturing and construction sector is a growing one, and as population and infrastructure expand, it’s vital that we take all actionable paths to reduce emissions.

Manufacturing and construction contributed to 6.3 billion tonnes of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2019. Let’s look at the breakdown of greenhouse gas emissions by sector over the years from Our World In Data.

In 2019 electricity and heat were the biggest carbon emitters, while transport came in second place.

Manufacturing and construction overtook the agriculture sector in 2007 to become the third largest contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions.

Building a Solution

One solution to reducing the impact of the manufacturing and construction sector is to repurpose materials. This reduces emissions and waste (Read more...)

The Construction Industry’s Growing Waste Problem


This post is by Tessa Di Grandi from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Northstar Clean Technologies

The Construction Industry’s Growing Waste Problem

Globally around 2 billion tonnes of waste is generated every year and the construction industry is a large contributor.

What’s more, demand for construction materials is growing alongside population and economic development, but the production of new materials to support this growth consumes both energy and resources.

The above infographic from Northstar Clean Technologies highlights the final destinations of construction and demolition (C&D) debris.

Breaking Down Waste

The sad truth is that only a small amount of C&D debris that could be repurposed actually is.

So where do these materials end up? Let’s take a look at the breakdown of C&D debris by destination in 2018, recorded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Material C&D Debris Type (million tons)LandfillCompost & MulchManu. ProductsAggregate, OtherFuelSoil Amend.
Concrete71.2032.8301.200
Wood29.62.51.207.50
Gypsum Drywall13.200.2001.9
Metal1.103.6000
Brick and Clay Tile10.8001.500
Asphalt Shingles13020.10.020
Asphalt Concrete4.9091.810.300

143.8 million tons of C&D waste was sent to landfill in 2018, consisting of a mix of materials ranging from wood, concrete, and asphalt.  

Concrete (Read more...)

How Much Waste Does a Renovation Create?


This post is by Tessa Di Grandi from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Northstar Clean Technologies

How Much Waste Does a Renovation Create?

In 2020, the U.S. home remodeling market surpassed a massive $340 billion and is predicted to continue rising at a compound annual growth rate of over 4.1% between 2021 and 2027, according to Global Market Insights.

The problem is home renovations produce a significant amount of waste. In fact, renovations can generate approximately 60 pounds of waste per square foot on average.

With this expected growth in the remodeling market, contractors will need to find new ways to repurpose renovation waste that would otherwise end up in landfill.

In this graphic by Northstar Clean Technologies, we show how much waste can be generated as a result of construction and demolition debris during renovations and how it can be reduced.

Construction and Demolition Waste

Construction and demolition (C&D) debris is estimated to make up nearly one-quarter of the total waste generated in the U.S. in a single year. 

Let’s take a look at the breakdown of total construction and demolition debris recorded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2018.

 Waste During Construction
(million tons)
Demolition Debris
(million tons)
Total C&D Debris
(million tons)
Concrete24.2381.0405.2
Wood Products3.437.440.8
Drywall and Plasters3.911.315.2
Steel04.74.7
Brick and Clay Tile (Read more...)

Creating Sustainable Supply Chains in Luxury Fashion


This post is by Dorothy Neufeld from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Gucci Equilibrium.

Creating Sustainable Supply Chains in Luxury Fashion

From regenerative farming to bio-based materials, leaders in luxury fashion are taking bold action to create more sustainable supply chains. As a result, companies have made strides in reducing their environmental impacts—with innovative visions for the future. 

This infographic from Gucci Equilibrium breaks down how the luxury fashion industry is integrating sustainable practices into supply chains, opening the door to new opportunities and innovation. 

The State of Sustainable Supply Chains

More than ever, luxury fashion companies are putting their money where their mouth is. In fact, references to “sustainability” in annual reports from 15 of the largest fashion companies are now on par with financial terms.

Number of Times Mentioned in Annual Reports
20152016201720182019
"Profit", "Growth"2,1672,3292,3662,7112,539
"Sustainable", "Sustainability"1,2091,5531,5291,8462,467

Not only are companies talking about sustainability, they are taking action to reduce their impacts across their carbon emissions, biodiversity, water use, waste production, chemical use, and pollution.

Diving deeper, the luxury fashion industry is finding new ways to reduce their impacts while increasing sustainability across their supply chains:

  • Sustainable sources that give back to nature: Partner with suppliers using regenerative farming practices.
  • Materials: Use organic, regenerative and recycled materials.
  • Design: Embed circularity principles and innovate.
  • Production: (Read more...)