Founder Q&A with Michal Meiri – CEO of Health Tech company, Agamon


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

In our latest Q&A we sat down with Michal Meiri, Co-founder of Agamon, an Israeli health tech company who have developed a comprehensive NLP and AI platform that enables medical teams to leverage data for better patient care, reduced risk and improved outcomes.  

Michal Meiri – Cofounder of Agamon

We recently participated in Agamon’s $3M round, led by MMC. On the investment, our Managing Partner, Reshma Sohoni, comments: “We have been an incredibly active investor in health tech over the past decade and one of the biggest, unsolved issues is the endless document problem in health systems. Agamon’s cutting edge platform will be highly impactful to transform clinical text into usable data to help improve patient care – saving money, time, and more importantly, improving patient outcomes.”

We’re incredibly excited to have Michal and the Agamon team as new additions to the Seedcamp Nation. And, on that note, over to Michal to tell us more about what they’re building and why it’s needed now more than ever.

What led you to create Agamon and why is there a specific need for it now? 

There is an urgent and unmet need for healthcare organizations to improve quality and reduce the cost of care. The United States, for example, ranks highest in percentage of GDP spent on healthcare, but only ranks 15th in terms of quality. I always believed that data holds the key to transformation in the way healthcare is delivered; data can unlock opportunities for cost reduction, care improvement, and so much more.

Coming from the fintech world, I was intrigued by the potential to use data to transform traditional industries. Bringing this potential from financial institutions to healthcare, I quickly found that the problem is that in healthcare around 80% of data is textual, which essentially means that this data cannot be used to automate processes. 

Agamon offers a solution to this exact problem–we apply our NLP and AI technology to make sense of these textual narratives, allowing healthcare organizations to automate urgent and time-consuming processes. This need obviously existed before the pandemic, but the massive volume of free text on patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 only strengthened the case for structuring these datasets and many others. 

Can you tell me more about your background and how you met your co-founders? 

Before establishing Agamon, I was a product manager in the FinTech industry at both Wonga and Checkout, where I built B2B products that leveraged mass volumes of data to make smarter decisions about our lives, which no doubt gave me the skills and experience necessary to do what I’m doing today at Agamon. In terms of my academic background, I hold an MPhil in Nanotechnology from Cambridge University and a BSc in Computer Science and Chemistry from Tel Aviv University. 

I met my co-founder Omri, Agamon’s CTO, while consulting for an Israeli FinTech startup, where he was previously the CTO. I truly enjoyed working with Omri and was impressed by his ability to manage and teach developers with different backgrounds and levels while instilling a sense of enjoyment and fun. Omri is a unique CTO in the sense that he’s a proper co-founder that understands not only the technology side of the business but the strategic side as well and that, in my opinion, is  quite unique. I knew I would enjoy building a business with him and that we would both bring a completely different set of skills to the table. 

You’re currently working mainly across Israel and the US. Have you noticed any major differences when it comes to operating and selling across the two different countries? 

For sure. Israelis are much more direct and blunt, so doing business in the US is different in every possible way. In Israel, everything moves significantly faster, relatively speaking. In addition to the cultural differences, there are differences inherent to a private vs. public market. Israel relies on a public healthcare system incentivized mostly towards improving care, conducting research and reducing costs. In spite of the transition to value-based care in the US, the financials of their healthcare system are still very much based on fee-for-service. This means that Agamon’s use cases and value proposition needs to be adjusted to align appropriately with each market and we adjust our story accordingly.

What do you think the current climate means for the health tech industry?

While the current climate has been devastating in so many ways, I think it’s probably the best thing that could have happened to the healthtech industry. It has brought light to the urgent need to improve efficiency and automate processes both in hospitals and other care delivery settings. Not doing so has already resulted in so many lost lives, malpractice claims, and wasted resources. It is now clearer than ever that healthcare must make the leap and join the 21st century, and fortunately, many organizations are embracing this and are even excited about the possibilities and potential brought in by technology and innovation.

How did you first hear about Seedcamp? 

Seedcamp is a well-known brand; I heard about it often when I lived and worked in the tech industry in London. I always knew that it is one of the best funds for seed companies. When MMC, our lead investor, suggested connecting us with SC, it was a no brainer. The partners were really curious about the product itself and asked some really interesting questions about the features and product roadmap. Having been a product manager, that hooked me immediately!

How have you found the experience of being a Seedcamp founder so far? 

We had a founders’ bootcamp a few months ago, which I really enjoyed. What’s great about Seedcamp is that companies all join at a very early stage, so you join a community of founders in similar situations–the networking and dialogue are invaluable. Also, it feels like the partners are really keen to support founders, whether directly or through the platform they provide. 

Any words of advice for anyone thinking about starting their own business? 

It’s a tough journey so make sure you do something that you truly enjoy doing and feel passionate about, and if you find it, just keep pushing. 

Why we led pre-seed into travel tech startup Tickitto


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

The events and experiences category represents the third-largest travel segment worldwide and is growing faster than the overall travel market. Despite that, the space is made up of suppliers or reservation platforms that often focus their efforts on specific genre and/or geographies. That’s why we’re excited to back Dana and the team at Tickitto, a travel tech company that aims to help travel retailers access tickets to events and travel-related experiences through one single connection.

Tickitto Founder and CEO, Dana Latouff

While travel and experiences have been temporarily hit, we believe the problem Tickitto is out to address is one that’s deeply felt across the industry where a lack of unification in how travel experiences can be surfaced and booked creates frustration for developers and customers alike.

Tickitto plans to carry out a lot of the heavy-lifting experienced by travel retailers by standardizing the infrastructure and offering configurable front-end interfaces. With a few lines of code, any developer can tap into the ticket supply and start building a fantastic ticket buying experience on their platform. 

“The API environment in this space is still in its infancy, and there is a huge opportunity for innovation in this multi-billion dollar industry,” says Dana Lattouf, Founder and CEO. 

Travel retailers will not only limit what can be large up-front development costs but will be able to earn additional revenue through commission on those tickets. With COVID-19 hitting the travel space significantly, travel retailers are inevitably focused on their recovery plans, which includes how supporting ancillary revenue streams can help drive future revenues. 

Dana adds:

“Tickets for theatre, music, sport and the arts can be easily overlooked during the trip but are essential to our enjoyment. In fact, it is those events and activities that motivate us to pack our bags and go. 

One would naturally think that acquiring ticket supply is relatively straightforward and made available by plugging into an API. We realised this is not the case, and that many platforms still run on legacy infrastructure, making the integration work labour-intensive.

Our aim is to work with major ticketing platforms, sports rights holders, event organisers and experience suppliers to modernise the infrastructure and build external collaboration capabilities to scale their reach. This will enable us to find new ways to serve today’s modern traveller and make it simpler to deliver a connected trip experience via their preferred travel retailer’s platform. So that when you are booking your flights to LA in April, you can also buy tickets to an event at Staples Center or an LA Galaxy home game from the same platform”.

On the investment our Partner, Tom Wilson, comments:

“When we first met Dana and the Tickitto team, we were amazed by their deep understanding of this space and passion for solving the problems they saw in the market. Spending more time with the team, it is clear they have the founder-market fit that we look for. We are excited to lead their pre-seed round and support them on their mission to transform the infrastructure that underpins how tickets to events and experiences are sold and distributed.”

We’re excited to have met Dana through our relationship with Google for Startups, as one of the fantastic companies selected to participate in their Female Founders programme.

For more information visit: https://tickitto.com/

MedAll launches with a world-first virtual medical conference brought to life on Hopin


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

The importance of global and equitable access to healthcare has never been more acute, yet standards and accessibility vary hugely across the world. That’s why we’re incredibly excited to announce our investment in MedAll.

On the investment, our partner, Tom Wilson, comments: “What the MedAll team is building has the potential to be truly transformational to the training of healthcare professionals and to connecting the global community. They’re exactly the sort of passionate mission-driven team that we love to back and we feel privileged to have the opportunity to lead their pre-seed round”.

We sat down with founder, Dr. Phil McElnay, off-the-back of MedAll’s recent, and world-first, online health conference attended by over 300 delegates from across the world and brought to life using portfolio company, Hopin, to discuss what they’re building in more detail.

MedAll founder and CEO, Dr. Phil McElnay

What led you to create MedAll and why do you think there’s a specific need for it now?

Healthcare training is inequitable around the world. Ultimately that means care is inequitable too. We were compelled that we needed to make excellent healthcare training more accessible, more fair and within reach of every healthcare organisation around the world. We are otherwise careering towards a global healthcare catastrophe. The World Health Organisation forecasts that we will need an additional 18 million healthcare professionals by 2030. To provide high quality training at that scale – in addition to managing the glaring crisis we otherwise face-  the world needs a paradigm shift in how medical education is delivered. We plan to make the best-in-class medical training technology within reach of every healthcare organisation around the world.

[Background: In high income countries a significant amount of money is spent on digital technology that healthcare professionals use to regularly demonstrate and evidence their competencies throughout their training and professional practice. It means patients can trust those who are treating them, and they receive comparable care across. It’s at the cornerstone of most medical training programmes in high income countries. However, if the costs of administering this software could be reduced we could channel more of our precious healthcare resources back to frontline care.

In low and many middle income countries the sort of technology is challenging to implement- some of the countries can’t afford to deploy the bespoke systems used in high income countries. It means the best in class training technology is not available where it is often needed most. We have built a tool that makes it possible for every healthcare organisation to build and implement that technology themselves- without touching a line of code. It means it is accessible, it means healthcare professionals get high quality training and it means patients around the world are a step closer to equitable care.

What were you doing before you started MedAll?

I am a medic by training. Prior to jumping into startup life, I was a National Institute for Health Research Academic Clinical Fellow in Cardiothoracic surgery – or in non-medical lingo – a doctor in heart and lung surgery. I was a proud member of the Association of Surgeons in Training Executive and subsequently a medical director in the Rare Disease Unit at GlaxoSmithKline where I got to work with world experts on finding therapies for rare diseases. Whilst getting MedAll off the ground I was fortunate enough to maintain part-time clinical practice as a General Practice Registrar in Northern Ireland.

MedAll was recently hailed for launching a world-first in medical conferences. Can you tell us where the idea came from and how you went about turning it into a reality>?

Medics disseminate their latest research findings at medical conferences. As coronavirus took hold in early March 2020, we watched as conference after conference was cancelled. This was undoubtedly the right thing to do but was going to have a huge impact on rapid research dissemination. Now, more than ever, we needed to sharing, debating and discussing the latest medical research, but we needed to think creatively and responsibly. We sprung into action and put out a rallying call to the medical community. In under 6 weeks a small team of 20 medics from the MedAll community organised the “MedAll International Virtual Medical Conference” – an online medical conference on a scale that was hailed as a “world-first.” 

On 23rd May 2020, alongside our friends at Hopin, we hosted 200+ presenters, speakers, workshop leads and keynote speakers at an all-day virtual conference with a main stage and 18 virtual breakout rooms. There were 50+ oral research presentations across every medical specialty, 100+ virtual research poster presentations, four wonderful keynote speakers including the Director of Public Health for the New Zealand Ministry of Health, Time Magazine and Forbes featured surgeon Prof Shafi Ahmed, Medical Advisor to Medecins Sans Frontieres and the Associate Dean for Anaesthesia for Scotland. Over 300 delegates joined from every continent, other than Antarctica.

What brought you to Seedcamp? 

I was impressed with the mission that Seedcamp held in helping founders solve big, global problems. The diversity of the startups you had backed – in both their company domains and founder experience – also opened up a diverse network of talented people on the same journey. Within the healthcare portfolio, I could see talented people doing incredible things in a whole range of settings around the world- like Elephant Healthcare, Viz.ai and doctorly.

Any portfolio companies you’re already using/a customer of?

Where do I start? We’re big users of multiple companies across the Seedcamp portfolio and have already benefited from using Transferwise, SeedLegals, Hopin and Stotles, all of which are incredible. We used Hopin as the platform for our medical conference.

What’s next on the horizon?

We are radically focused on improving global medical training. The MedAll community of healthcare professionals is central to that and we plan to support our colleagues in healthcare in two ways over the next number of months.

Firstly, we’ll be running another – even more exciting – MedAll IVMC (International Virtual Medical Conference) in September and will be making some big announcements over the next few weeks – check out MedAll.org/conference or our twitter feed @MedAllApp for more details.

Secondly, we are excited to be working with some of the world’s largest medical NGOs to build out the organisational functionality on MedAll that will see the true transformation of medical training in many countries around the world. 

Anything you’d like to add about the healthcare space and where innovation is needed? 

Historically implementation has been slow in healthcare. Quite rightly the space has to be regulated and great care has to be taken to ensure safe introduction of new technologies. However, what we are seeing right now is the acceleration of innovation in healthcare at a pace that we could never have imagined- and much of it being done safely and with patients at the centre.

Outside of all of the technological innovations happening in healthcare right now- VR, AR, AI, big data, nanotech- one of the biggest global challenges to healthcare is actually less technological and more sociological- we need to help our healthcare professionals to keep the current pace of innovation. We need to see the introduction of systems that support our healthcare professionals to use their clinical understanding to problem-solve, design, innovate, test and implement innovations. 

Healthcare is a community. And when that community collectively strives for better we truly achieve incredible things.

Kitch launches to bring our favourite restaurants to our home with €1M pre-seed


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

Last year when we met Rui Bento and Nuno Rodrigues – two former executives of Uber in Southern Europe who launched the ridesharing and food delivery company in Portugal – they told us about their mission to enable everyone in the city to enjoy dishes from their favourite restaurants, at home. While the concept of food delivery is well-known thanks to the likes of Uber Eats, Deliveroo etc, Rui and Nuno were truly thinking ‘delivery-first’, something traditional restaurants aren’t set up for.

Seeing the potential of these two highly impressive operators and the poor infrastructure many restaurants have in place, which prevents them from delivering to consumers, it was an easy decision for us to lead this €1M pre-seed round alongside Lisbon-based Mustard Seed MAZE which has also attracted a number of industry-specific angels including João Cepeda, Founder and President at Time Out Market Lisbon

“Food delivery and takeaway are a growing part of our routines and will become even more prevalent in the context of the current pandemic. It’s easy, convenient, and there are more and more restaurants available. However, not everything is perfect. Many of our favourite restaurants still don’t make it to our dining tables. And most restaurants haven’t conceived their food to travel across town inside a backpack, on a motorbike”, shares Rui.

Every element of the Kitch experience is designed from scratch — from the ingredients to the packaging – and the team is committed to leaving no trail behind its deliveries, be it by reducing non-reusable plastic packaging, implementing technology-based solutions to reduce food waste, or improving the energy efficiency of food production and delivery.

On the investment, our Partner, Sia Houchangnia, comments:

“The way people eat is changing, fast, and Kitch provides the infrastructure that will allow restaurants to adapt and thrive in this new environment while at the same time building a brand that will be recognized for best-in-class operations. There is a massive opportunity here to be one of the few businesses that define the future of food which is an extremely complex market to navigate. Therefore, it is essential to have an execution driven team that knows the space inside out. With Rui and Nuno, we know we have found one. They are exceptional, execution-driven founders, and what they’ve achieved in only a few months reinforce our belief that they can expand fast and be one of the few winners in this highly competitive market.”

The team will use the capital raised from this round to start developing and scaling its operations from Lisbon, connecting the city to its favourite restaurants through meals made for delivery, offering restaurants new avenues to develop their businesses in a delicate economic environment, and taking a first step to making food delivery more sustainable.

Primer raises £3.8M to take the pain out of payments


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

At the beginning of this year, we led the pre-seed investment into Paul and Gabriel, the brains behind Primer, the new Fintech infrastructure solution out to help supercharge payments teams. We’re thrilled for the team who within a few short months have gone onto raise a new seed round led by Balderton Capital and with participation from Fintech giants including Taavet Hinrikus, bringing their total raised to just under £3.8M

Paul and Gabriel met while working at Braintree/Paypal where they worked collaboratively across sales and technical solutions in pitching to global mid-market and large enterprise merchants. It was during this time the pair experienced first-hand the core challenges merchants face in building out complex payments systems, leading to the genesis of Primer in January 2020. It’s also where we originally met and got to know Gabriel — who spent some time with the portfolio as part of his role at Braintree — and we’re now delighted to include him and Paul as fully-fledged members of the Seedcamp Nation.

Payments is incredibly complex and merchants’ needs have become increasingly sophisticated over the past few years, demanding more from their overall payments solution which requires them to leverage a variety of PSPs, local banking relationships (such as SEPA DD), properietary payment methods (such as Klarna, GoCardless and WeChat) and other third party payments services in order to expand to new markets and offer the payments experience their customers demand.

Add to this a need to optimise for cost and authorisation (acceptance) rates, reduce fraud, improve user experience and adapt to macro changes in the payments landscape (PSD2 and 3DS 2.0), the demands on payments teams have never been greater and, as a result, it becomes increasingly complex for merchants to scale payments as they manage an ever-growing web of interdependent technical integrations across payments services. This can directly impact user experience + checkout, and critically reduce visibility of data across their increasingly complex payments ecosystems.

Co-founder Gabriel LeRoux comments:

“Fundamentally, this is an infrastructure challenge. We see ourselves as doing the work merchants would have to do themselves, but through a unified API and integration, and with sophisticated data and analytics tools to help them take control of, and supercharge their global payments strategies. We’re aiming to remove all technical burden associated with implementing and managing payments through a best-in-class, unified payments API and checkout.”

Our Partner, Sia Houchangnia, adds:

“The highly fragmented world of payments has become extremely difficult for merchants to navigate on their own. Through its unified API and advanced analytics solution, Primer allows merchants to scale their payments without all the technical headaches. It takes a special team to make the complex simple and with Gab and Paul, we immediately knew we had one. They are both hugely ambitious and bring strong domain expertise from their time at Braintree as well as the perfect mix of commercial and technical excellence.”

For more information on how Primer can supercharge your payments team visit primer.io

How we invested in three new pre-seed companies we only ever met remotely


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Natasha Lytton. The original is [linked here]

A few weeks back, when the whole world changed, we knew we’d have to adapt alongside it. Slowing down or reducing our commitment to back new, early-stage founders was not an option so we had to find a way to bring the magic, energy and interactive nature of our in-person, pre-seed Investment Forum and translate it into a new, online-only experience. 

Since launching Fund IV in late 2017, we’ve introduced many new processes to help us maintain our high-volume of early-stage investments and to ensure we’re able to meet as many new European founders as possible. As part of our rolling and open submissions on our website, every 6-8 weeks we hold an ‘Investment Forum’ where we invite pre-seed companies we’ve been following and who’ve already pitched to our investment team, present in front of our own LPs. This tends to be a fast-paced, half-day affair where we have up to 15 companies from all across Europe present their business ideas in front of leading later stage investors and high-net-worths, enabling early-stage founders to get on the radar of growth funds and opening up potential syndication opportunities with some of the angel investors in the room. 

Some of our core team steering the ship during our first digital-only Investment Forum

With 35 LPs dialling in from seven different countries and presentations from 11 pre-seed startups across five, we wanted to break down how we made it work and why online-only should not in any way deter founders from seeking funding or investors from backing new companies. Now more than ever is a time for innovation and solutions that will fundamentally help with changes to the way we live, interact and buy.

Don’t forget, if you are an early-stage founder looking for investment, submissions are open on our website right here.

Planning:

We definitely had some serious questions about how we would be able to migrate our Investment Forum into an online-only format and what it would mean from a relationship perspective, both in terms of getting to know new founders and being able to engage with our own LPs. Thankfully, with the right tech tools, team and planning, we were able to come up with an incredibly detailed operation to ensure a slick operation.

The Objective

To reduce friction in an online-only arena creating a seamless experience where multiple pre-seed founders can present their businesses, investors feel engaged and stay for the duration and our core team participates throughout, ultimately leading to us investing in multiple new companies. 

Once clear on what we wanted to achieve, we then created an incredibly detailed breakdown of roles, responsibilities and testing of the best tech tools to help us get there. 

The Tools

  • Notion – our ‘source of truth’ and THE singular place where all aspects were laid out: notes, external links, pre, during and post-event responsibilities and the agenda for the day itself.
  • Zoom – we explored multiple tech solutions for how best to make this work; from a simple Zoom call, to live YouTube stream. In the end, we settled on a Zoom Webinar, ensuring we could manage the large number of attendees coming in and out (for the different startups presenting) and reducing friction or the need to train people in how to use a new tool. It also ensured solid data capture and seamless follow-up actions, all adding to the overall experience of the event itself.
  • Telegram – this event required serious synchronisation across the entire team and speedy communication. We set up separate Telegram groups with all of the 11 startups presenting to ensure they felt supported and were clear on what they needed to do, timings for their presentation and all necessary links. 

On the day

All events, be them online or offline, have their glitches. Thankfully, the biggest issue we experienced was connectivity problems for one of the founders presenting – bring on 5G? Our team was split across founder management, tech and presenting, ensuring all elements ran as smoothly as possible and maintaining engagement levels from our LPs.

The Outcome

We’re thrilled to announce our investment in three new companies as a result of our first ever remote-only Investment Forum. These companies are tackling everything from driving better standards in carbon markets to extracting knowledge from recorded meetings and providing better medical staff profiling for career growth and research collaboration. 

Our pre-seed Investment Forum takes place every 6-8 weeks and provides highly competitive terms for founders. The next one will take place in the middle of May. If you’d like to be considered and join the likes of TransferWise, Revolut and UiPath and become part of the Seedcamp Nation then we’d love to know what you’re building right here.

We believe although the world is currently in flux, that with these sort of occurrences also comes an opportunity for great things to be built by great people and we are here to back these founders and be a part of that journey from the earliest stage on.

How we invested in three new pre-seed companies we only ever met remotely


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

A few weeks back, when the whole world changed, we knew we’d have to adapt alongside it. Slowing down or reducing our commitment to back new, early-stage founders was not an option so we had to find a way to bring the magic, energy and interactive nature of our in-person, pre-seed Investment Forum and translate it into a new, online-only experience. 

Since launching Fund IV in late 2017, we’ve introduced many new processes to help us maintain our high-volume of early-stage investments and to ensure we’re able to meet as many new European founders as possible. As part of our rolling and open submissions on our website, every 6-8 weeks we hold an ‘Investment Forum’ where we invite pre-seed companies we’ve been following and who’ve already pitched to our investment team, present in front of our own LPs. This tends to be a fast-paced, half-day affair where we have up to 15 companies from all across Europe present their business ideas in front of leading later stage investors and high-net-worths, enabling early-stage founders to get on the radar of growth funds and opening up potential syndication opportunities with some of the angel investors in the room. 

Some of our core team steering the ship during our first digital-only Investment Forum

With 35 LPs dialling in from seven different countries and presentations from 11 pre-seed startups across five, we wanted to break down how we made it work and why online-only should not in any way deter founders from seeking funding or investors from backing new companies. Now more than ever is a time for innovation and solutions that will fundamentally help with changes to the way we live, interact and buy.

Don’t forget, if you are an early-stage founder looking for investment, submissions are open on our website right here.

Planning:

We definitely had some serious questions about how we would be able to migrate our Investment Forum into an online-only format and what it would mean from a relationship perspective, both in terms of getting to know new founders and being able to engage with our own LPs. Thankfully, with the right tech tools, team and planning, we were able to come up with an incredibly detailed operation to ensure a slick operation.

The Objective

To reduce friction in an online-only arena creating a seamless experience where multiple pre-seed founders can present their businesses, investors feel engaged and stay for the duration and our core team participates throughout, ultimately leading to us investing in multiple new companies. 

Once clear on what we wanted to achieve, we then created an incredibly detailed breakdown of roles, responsibilities and testing of the best tech tools to help us get there. 

The Tools

  • Notion – our ‘source of truth’ and THE singular place where all aspects were laid out: notes, external links, pre, during and post-event responsibilities and the agenda for the day itself.
  • Zoom – we explored multiple tech solutions for how best to make this work; from a simple Zoom call, to live YouTube stream. In the end, we settled on a Zoom Webinar, ensuring we could manage the large number of attendees coming in and out (for the different startups presenting) and reducing friction or the need to train people in how to use a new tool. It also ensured solid data capture and seamless follow-up actions, all adding to the overall experience of the event itself.
  • Telegram – this event required serious synchronisation across the entire team and speedy communication. We set up separate Telegram groups with all of the 11 startups presenting to ensure they felt supported and were clear on what they needed to do, timings for their presentation and all necessary links. 

On the day

All events, be them online or offline, have their glitches. Thankfully, the biggest issue we experienced was connectivity problems for one of the founders presenting – bring on 5G? Our team was split across founder management, tech and presenting, ensuring all elements ran as smoothly as possible and maintaining engagement levels from our LPs.

The Outcome

We’re thrilled to announce our investment in three new companies as a result of our first ever remote-only Investment Forum. These companies are tackling everything from driving better standards in carbon markets to extracting knowledge from recorded meetings and providing better medical staff profiling for career growth and research collaboration. 

Our pre-seed Investment Forum takes place every 6-8 weeks and provides highly competitive terms for founders. The next one will take place in the middle of May. If you’d like to be considered and join the likes of TransferWise, Revolut and UiPath and become part of the Seedcamp Nation then we’d love to know what you’re building right here.

We believe although the world is currently in flux, that with these sort of occurrences also comes an opportunity for great things to be built by great people and we are here to back these founders and be a part of that journey from the earliest stage on.

Hop-in to the future of events as Hopin raises $6.5M


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

With some founders we meet, “the stars just perfectly align”, says our Partner Tom Wilson, and no more is that true than with our investment in Hopin, founded by Johnny Boufarhat. We’re over the moon for the team as they today announce their $6.5M seed round for their all-in-one online events platform that brings people closer by replicating the experience of offline events and makes them accessible at a global scale.

We led the pre-seed into Johnny and his vision for Hopin and the future of events in summer of 2019 and are thrilled to continue the journey and see him quickly go onto raise this highly sought after round with some of the world’s most impactful investors onboard with this round led by Accel and with participation from Northzone, WebSummit’s Amaranthine Fund and Slack Fund. The round is joined by high-profile angel investors including founder of Seedcamp-backed unicorn, UiPath, Daniel Dines, Supercell founder Ilkka Paananen, Intercom founder Des Traynor, GoCardless COO Carlos Gonzalez-Cadenas and Miro founder Andrei Khusid.

Hopin founder Johnny Boufarhat

The event industry is massive, with many millions of people attending events every year. However, in a time where travel has been heavily impacted by a global health emergency and seen growing concern about its environmental impact, there is a need for a sustainable solution for attending events, that doesn’t require you to travel.

Hopin is an online venue where organizers can create, host and manage live events for up to 100,000 attendees. With Hopin’s Continue reading “Hop-in to the future of events as Hopin raises $6.5M”

Pointy: A tale of relationships, real innovation and why finding the right partner, in business as in life, is make or break


This post is by Natasha Lytton from Seedcamp

Pointy co-founders Mark Cummings & Charles Bibby

True entrepreneurship and success does not come overnight, and those who are truly struck with the bug to challenge the status quo and reshape staid industries are often compelled to do so again, and again. 

Yesterday Pointy, founded by Mark Cummins and Charles Bibby, announced plans for an acquisition by Google. We couldn’t be more excited for the team and there is no greater validation for the work the team have put in over the past six years. Joining forces with Google will help supercharge their growth and push them into new markets and territories in a way that wouldn’t be possible without deep pockets and wide-ranging reach.

“Seedcamp was a transformative moment”

What many of you may not know is that Pointy was not Mark and Charles’ first rodeo, nor our first interaction with them. We first met Mark at a Seedcamp week event in London in 2009. Back then, the European startup ecosystem was in its infancy and the well known Seedcamp events were very much a hub for building and connecting this emerging network of entrepreneurs with investors and seasoned operators. Mark pitched his first company, Plink, at the event and was shortlisted alongside 20 other companies including Brainient – who went on to be acquired by Teads (and whose founder we just re-invested in with his new HealthTech business, Ezra – but that’s a story for another time!)

At that Seedcamp Week event in 2009, Google met Continue reading “Pointy: A tale of relationships, real innovation and why finding the right partner, in business as in life, is make or break”

How does an early-stage investor value your startup and how can you influence it for the better?

In this post, our Managing Partner, Carlos, provides an update and further considerations for founders questioning how an early-stage investor values a startup? If you want to know how to maximize your valuation and drivers behind the boundaries of possible valuations for your company then read on!

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

In my previous post, I covered how macro and geo contexts, amongst several factors,  determine the relativistic value of a company to an investor on exit, and how traditional finance-driven valuations methods (DCF, etc) were inappropriate for early-stage startups even if some of the elements that drive those finance-driven valuation methods were still applicable, such as expected revenues. I also covered how several factors about your company can influence what valuation you might be able to achieve. To kick-off, let’s revisit those points.

The key drivers for maximizing your valuation possibilities are:

  1. Excellent metrics. As different types of

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