The difference between VR and HMDs


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


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Yesterday, Samsung announced a new 360 degree, 3D camera system. It is ostensibly for capturing content on the Samsung Gear VR, powered by Oculus. It’s a technical feat, and probably a wonderful product, but it’s not Virtual Reality for me. It’s more accurately a 3D HMD camera system.

Presence

The key difference between HMDs (head mounted displays) and actual Virtual Reality is a sense of Presence. For those that have tried the Oculus Crescent Bay demos you have finally felt it, albeit fleetingly. It’s that moment where your brain goes from trying to convince yourself that you are in this other world, to your brain trying to convince yourself that you aren’t. 

Similarly, you know HMD approaches when you see them, there is limited to no presence. The best example is the Google Cardbord VR Kit. It’s immersive and cool in the way that 3D movies are more immersive and cool. But it’s not changing your perception.

Michael Abrash has given great talks on this over the years, most recently at Oculus’ Connect, where he defines the need to advance in areas of persistence, resolution, latency, and positional tracking in order for a real consumer VR product to be able to reliably create presence. 

Virtual reality isn’t seeing something all around us. It’s the technology to hack into the best information gathering system we have: the visual cortex.

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Why does fussing about what is and isn’t VR matter?

When we confuse the wording, the impact is that we confuse whether we are on the right path to the solution. 

The most critical issue with the Samsung system is that it doesn’t provide positional tracking, one of the key issues for creating presence. As long as you keep your head perfectly still it might work but if you tilt your head the effect is completely broken. This is similar to most camera system approaches from other companies. 

What I’d really love to see is a camera system that WAS able to capture real life and project it into a virtual space. To create true telepresence: my grandparents visiting their grandchildren, or being at the bottom of the ocean, or in a meeting with my Spark partners in New York. Not a 3D animation of those events with avatars, and not a 3D projection of those events, but really being present in those moments. 

I’m excited about that future.

“It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist,…”


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




““It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist, and technologist. “It’s bigger than sound. It’s the audience literally inhabiting the narrative.””

Great quotes from Chris Milk on the power of virtual reality in The Last Medium via California Sunday Magazine & cdixon

“It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist,…”


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




““It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist, and technologist. “It’s bigger than sound. It’s the audience literally inhabiting the narrative.””

Great quotes from Chris Milk on the power of virtual reality in The Last Medium via California Sunday Magazine & cdixon

“It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist,…”


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




““It’s bigger than color,” said Chris Milk, the influential music-video director, multimedia artist, and technologist. “It’s bigger than sound. It’s the audience literally inhabiting the narrative.””

Great quotes from Chris Milk on the power of virtual reality in The Last Medium via California Sunday Magazine & cdixon

Apple Watch and the age of glanceability


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




image

Apple execs seemed pretty excited about the new Apple Watch, but there are still plenty of people that think that consumer electronics companies obsession with watches is akin to 3D TVs — chasing innovation for innovations sake. They are likely wrong.

Back at Ambient Devices in 2001 as we were thinking about the future of our products & glanceable computing we used to have a chart that had “real-time need” on one axis and “glanceablility” on the other axis. I thought of that graph today as Apple announced their watch.

A platform is nothing without its core uses, and despite showcasing a plethora of apps it seems they spent a majority of their energy on three uses:

1. Payment, with the announcement of Apple Pay.

2. Health, with applications for both casual users and fitness buffs. Plus light sensors to read heartrate and blood flow.

3. Communication, with a series of innovations to try and push the watch out of “read only” mode. This included added emoji-texting, a new tap/swipe/heartbeat language, and analyzing text in an sms for one click responses.

It’s hard to say which of these, if any, will be killer apps without actually using them, but they all have one thing in common… combining a real-time need that can be solved at a glance.

When skeptics talk about not really needing or wanting a smart watch “because they have their phone” this reminds me of folks who didn’t think they needed a smart phone because they have a laptop. You absolutely could have used Instagram, Uber, Google Maps, and Postmates in a pre-mobile world — in fact their analogs existed in many cases — but the immediacy of the phone and its sensors made mobile phones the perfect instantiation of these ideas. Taking them from merely interesting to truly magical.

Similarly, for applications where seconds matter, context is important, and the problem can be solved at a glance there is a disruptive new platform — your wrist.

As for Apple’s core three applications, I’m probably most excited about the innovation in communication. Payment has the largest potential of course, as grabbing my phone to pay isn’t much better than grabbing my wallet, but Apple Pay relies on NFC and I’m skeptical they will be the one’s to finally crack that particular nut. The health and wellness products are wonderfully designed, but they didn’t really focus on realtime feedback and coaching as much as they probably should to warrant being on your wrist. Meanwhile the communication innovations seem like subtle but potentially important ways to make you feel more connected throughout the day.

Of course, chances are that there are use cases still around the corner that will ultimately Continue reading “Apple Watch and the age of glanceability”

Apple Watch and the age of glanceability


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




image

Apple execs seemed pretty excited about the new Apple Watch, but there are still plenty of people that think that consumer electronics companies obsession with watches is akin to 3D TVs — chasing innovation for innovations sake. They are likely wrong.

Back at Ambient Devices in 2001 as we were thinking about the future of our products & glanceable computing we used to have a chart that had “real-time need” on one axis and “glanceablility” on the other axis. I thought of that graph today as Apple announced their watch.

A platform is nothing without its core uses, and despite showcasing a plethora of apps it seems they spent a majority of their energy on three uses:

1. Payment, with the announcement of Apple Pay.

2. Health, with applications for both casual users and fitness buffs. Plus light sensors to read heartrate and blood flow.

3. Communication, with a series Continue reading “Apple Watch and the age of glanceability”

Pitching your current investors


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It catches many founders by surprise, but one of the hardest pitches to a venture capital firm is actually the pitch to your current investors. My friend Rob Go wrote about this not long ago, but it comes up regularly so I wanted to tackle some successful strategies I’ve seen.

The most common reason founders end up presenting to their current VCs is when raising a new round of capital and looking for pro-rata support. Or perhaps everyone is contemplating an inside round. Other times it is just an update because it has been a while and the business has materially changed.

There are two dynamics at play that cause these conversations to be awkward. 

The first is that the internal pitch is often one of the very first times a founder is presenting for that round of financing, and they treat it as a “dry run” for the real pitches Continue reading “Pitching your current investors”

Pitching your current investors


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It catches many founders by surprise, but one of the hardest pitches to a venture capital firm is actually the pitch to your current investors. My friend Rob Go wrote about this not long ago, but it comes up regularly so I wanted to tackle some successful strategies I’ve seen.

The most common reason founders end up presenting to their current VCs is when raising a new round of capital and looking for pro-rata support. Or perhaps everyone is contemplating an inside round. Other times it is just an update because it has been a while and the business has materially changed.

There are two dynamics at play that cause these conversations to be awkward. 

The first is that the internal pitch is often one of the very first times a founder is presenting for that round of financing, and they treat it as a “dry run” for the real pitches to come later. On the flip side sometimes a founder is talking to the partnership after a lot of other options have been exhausted and an internal round is on the table (that also probably means the team is exhausted of pitching). This is just an issue of being under, or over, practiced.  

The second is that founders can feel an awkward sense of telling people a bunch of things they already know. It’s like telling that really funny college story to friends, only your wife has heard it 10 times already… and the whole room is your wife.  

The folks that have been the most successful at the internal pitch just seem to a do a good job of owning it up to these issues.

The analogy I like to pitch like you are a band performing for your favorite fans. Just because they know the song doesn’t mean you can skip to the chorus. In fact it means you have to amp it up a notch, show them you still care. When I say performing I don’t mean being inauthentic, just that you shouldn’t be afraid of showing the passion you still have for your company. 

Secondly, treat it like a real pitch. I highly recommend that you do the internal pitch early, as good internal VCs will be able to give you tough feedback that will make you excel with outsiders. But that doesn’t mean you haven’t practiced against smaller investors or advisors beforehand. In sports you don’t wait for the first game of the season to start practicing, even though you know you’ll get better as the season goes on. 

Lastly, one trick I always used to try and keep it fresh was to insert an anecdote or extra slide that was Continue reading “Pitching your current investors”

Pitching your current investors


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It catches many founders by surprise, but one of the hardest pitches to a venture capital firm is actually the pitch to your current investors. My friend Rob Go wrote about this not long ago, but it comes up regularly so I wanted to tackle some successful strategies I’ve seen.

The most common reason founders end up presenting to their current VCs is when raising a new round of capital and looking for pro-rata support. Or perhaps everyone is contemplating an inside round. Other times it is just an update because it has been a while and the business has materially changed.

There are two dynamics at play that cause these conversations to be awkward. 

The first is that the internal pitch is often one of the very first times a founder is presenting for that round of financing, and they treat it as a “dry run” for the real pitches Continue reading “Pitching your current investors”

When you hit your Big Fucking Goal


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I was chatting with Jonathan Wegener, CEO of Timehop, last week. Timehop is a product that has always enjoyed almost unbelievably high retention and engagement, but previously struggled to hit hyper growth. After a ton of iteration over the last year suddenly they have started to grow quite quickly – breaking the top 50 in the US iOS Appstore, and the top 10 free overall in the UK. 

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Jonathan and his team have steered the product very well, so you can imagine there were a few congratulations in order. But, partly as a testament to the way Jonathan thinks, we spent a lot less time talking about how good growth is and a lot more about the right way to push going forward.

You see, some three months ago Jonathan set a big hairy goal of growing 10x. You know those moments, when you gather the team and Continue reading “When you hit your Big Fucking Goal”

When you hit your Big Fucking Goal


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I was chatting with Jonathan Wegener, CEO of Timehop, last week. Timehop is a product that has always enjoyed almost unbelievably high retention and engagement, but previously struggled to hit hyper growth. After a ton of iteration over the last year suddenly they have started to grow quite quickly – breaking the top 50 in the US iOS Appstore, and the top 10 free overall in the UK. 

image

Jonathan and his team have steered the product very well, so you can imagine there were a few congratulations in order. But, partly as a testament to the way Jonathan thinks, we spent a lot less time talking about how good growth is and a lot more about the right way to push going forward.

You see, some three months ago Jonathan set a big hairy goal of growing 10x. You know those moments, when you gather the team and Continue reading “When you hit your Big Fucking Goal”

When you hit your Big Fucking Goal


This post is by nabeel hyatt from nabeel hyatt


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I was chatting with Jonathan Wegener, CEO of Timehop, last week. Timehop is a product that has always enjoyed almost unbelievably high retention and engagement, but previously struggled to hit hyper growth. After a ton of iteration over the last year suddenly they have started to grow quite quickly – breaking the top 50 in the US iOS Appstore, and the top 10 free overall in the UK. 

image

Jonathan and his team have steered the product very well, so you can imagine there were a few congratulations in order. But, partly as a testament to the way Jonathan thinks, we spent a lot less time talking about how good growth is and a lot more about the right way to push going forward.

You see, some three months ago Jonathan set a big hairy goal of growing 10x. You know those moments, when you gather the team and say, “I know this sounds impossible but we need to find a way to get to this crazy place in a pretty short time frame.”

Now, I don’t know how his team took it, but I know that when I’ve set a goal like this with a team there is a really fine balance to be walked. On the one hand a single BIG FUCKING GOAL is bound to get their attention and feels exciting. On the other hand, you have to make the more skeptical folks on your team actually believe there is a chance it’s possible or they will think you’ve lost it.

Despite some probable skepticism, Jonathan did set that crazy goal, and then in less than three months they actually hit it! So the big question is “what now!”. The analogy I would paint is that you spend all this time, months or years, trying to push this big boulder called growth from the top of a hill. And you are trying every damn trick you can hear about or think of to get this damn thing to move. And then suddenly, sometimes, the boulder finally moves!

This moment is when you find out just how much drive you have in yourself, and how much you have recruited for the right kind of drive in your team. The drive isn’t just for when you are in “The Struggle” it’s for when you are in “Win More” mode. It’s that push to win a Game 7 in a long basketball playoff series, and then pick yourself back up, and despite what Nate Silver says, keep pushing and defy the odds again.

In times like these there are two natural instincts: a) it’s working, don’t fuck it up, b) take a quick breath to recover. Continue reading “When you hit your Big Fucking Goal”