AmazonBasics is killing it (& the competition)


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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We pay a lot of attention to Amazon’s AWS, Prime and Logistics business, but we don’t pay as much attention to something which could become a big business for Amazon: the AmazonBasics private label brand.

The Seattle-based Internet behemoth launched AmazonBasics in 2009, and since then it has added over 2000 products to its private label brand. It accounted for about $7.5 billion in revenues, a drop when compared to $233 billion Amazon brought in 2018. But the potential of this business is pretty high — and according to Joshua Fruhlinger, AmazonBasics are best sellers in 22 out of Amazon’s 51 categories. Interestingly:

While Amazon’s private label is clearly helping to maximize profits, they are rarely #1 sellers. In fact, on average, AmazonBasics products tend to rank somewhere in the middle of the top-100, especially as of late. The only products to average in the top-10 of their Continue reading “AmazonBasics is killing it (& the competition)”

Adrian Villa


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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A few days back, I had a chance to grab coffee with one of my favorite photographers, Adrian Villa. He is a software developer, who got tired of sitting behind the screen and keyboard and sought the freedom that comes from being in the open and making beautiful landscapes. Our coffee conversation was about the choices we make, not in the gear we use, but we choose to capture and how we decide to share it with others. We talked extensively about constraints in equipment and choices, and how they help improve our creativity.

As an artist, he has eschewed the latest and greatest cameras and instead has focused on creating stark, minimal, and hauntingly beautiful monochromatic images. He uses a generation old APS-C camera, in addition to lugging around his Bronica medium format camera.

In a few years, Adrian has found his voice by being incredibly obsessive about his Continue reading “Adrian Villa”

29/26/23 Anniversary


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


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Amy and I are celebrating our 29/26/23rd anniversary today.

It’s the summer solstice, which is a special day for us.

29 years ago we officially started dating.

26 years ago we declared ourselves married (and eloped.)

23 years ago we signed an official piece of paper that was witnessed at the Boulder County Clerk’s Office because it was a pain in the ass to not be officially married.

When I reflect on the last 29 years of my life, it’s been a remarkable experience to get to share it with Amy. When we started dating, I was 24 years old. I lived in Boston. I was running my first company. I lived in a 24,000 cubic foot loft. I was struggling through a divorce, a failed Ph.D. experience, and a very stressful software consulting company, that, while performing well, consumed 100 hours a week of me.

As I

Continue reading “29/26/23 Anniversary”

20VC: Justin Kan on Why We Have To Normalize Vulnerability in Startups Today, Why Attaching Happiness To Future Outcomes Will Only Lead To Suffering & Why It Is Total BS That You Have To “Suffer” When Doing A Startup


This post is by Harry Stebbings from The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch


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Justin Kan is the Founder and CEO @ Atrium, the startup providing a full-service corporate law firm that uses modern technology to give startups a legal experience that is fast, transparent, and price-predictable. To date, Justin has raised over $75m in funding from some of the best in the business including Founders Fund, a16z, First Round, General Catalyst, Thrive, Initialized and more. Prior to founding Atrium, Justin was a Partner @ Y Combinator, the globally renowned accelerator and the birthplace of some of today’s largest startups. Before that Justin was the Co-Founder @ Twitch, the world’s leading video platform and community for gamers which was acquired by Amazon for $970m. If that was not enough, Justin is also a prolific angel investor with investments in the likes of Cruise Automation, Rippling, Zenefits, Triplebyte and more.

In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

1.) How Justin made his way into the Continue reading “20VC: Justin Kan on Why We Have To Normalize Vulnerability in Startups Today, Why Attaching Happiness To Future Outcomes Will Only Lead To Suffering & Why It Is Total BS That You Have To “Suffer” When Doing A Startup”

188. Opportunity Zones — A Fit for VC? (Steve Glickman)


This post is by Nick Moran from The Full Ratchet


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Steve Glickman of Develop Advisors joins Nick to discuss Opportunity Zones — A Fit for VC?. In this episode, we cover: Quick overview of your background prior to Develop Advisors? Walk us through the origin story of EIG? You are also the founder & CEO of Develop Advisors – tell…

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My Photo Journey: Year Five


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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It has been around five years since I started making photos. Over the past few months, I feel that a certain level of harmony has developed between what my mind sees and what the camera captures. Though, the real magic still happens when I transform that digital negative into my interpretation of the scene.

So, what have I learned thus far? Continue reading “My Photo Journey: Year Five”

We Make the Future We Invest In


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


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Over the past few years, you’ve seen me write about Glowforge, the 3D laser printer that made history with their crowdfunding campaign back in 2015.

Glowforge launched that very campaign at a jam-packed World New York Maker Faire, where folks lined up for hours to get a glimpse at the shiny new machine. Over the next 30 days, they sold $28 million worth of pre-orders to an insatiable crowd of makers.

More recently, Glowforge was named Make magazine’s 2019 Editor’s Choice for a laser cutter. Their thousands of makers have already printed more than 3,000,000 amazing creations. And as a company, they have seen sales triple in just the last year.

So it was sobering when, last week, Maker Faire / Make Media closed their doors for good. In interviews, Make founder Dale Dougherty explains that the company wasn’t interesting to investors anymore, and that, frustratingly, it was failing as

Continue reading “We Make the Future We Invest In”

The SaaS Valuation Environment in Mid-2019


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Every six months or so, I take a look at how the public markets are valuing next-generation software companies. There’s been quite a bit of volatility over the last five years, and this update is no exception. As of mid-June, the public markets value software companies at all-time highs.

The chart above shows the total enterprise value (TEV)/forward revenue multiple for the basket of public software companies. Just a quick reminder on these metrics. Enterprise value equals market capitalization plus debt minus cash and short-term equivalents. Forward revenue is the sum of the projected revenues over the next 12 months.

The blue line the chart is the median over the period which is approximately 5.7x. The red line shows the median across the stocks in that particular month. In 2014, the median touched 7.7x forward before falling by about 60% to 3.3x two years later. Since then,

Continue reading “The SaaS Valuation Environment in Mid-2019”

Surveillance Capitalism


This post is by HBR.org from HBR.org


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“All digital infrastructure is used to shape human behavior in the direction that will be successful in the marketplace,” says Shoshana Zuboff, whose latest book, “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism,” is a primer for understanding how technology companies are shaping our economy and society.