Category: plant-based meat

5 Opportunities for Innovation in the Plant-Based Food Market


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by The Very Good Food Company (VGFC)

5 Opportunities for Innovation in the Plant-Based Food Market

From an increasing number of people claiming to be flexitarian to more alternatives product options hitting the shelves, the popularity of plant-based food has been skyrocketing—resulting in a consumer base that is far bigger than just vegetarians and vegans.

What’s more, plant-based meat has been called the “best climate investment” of late. It’s no wonder that the plant-based food market is flourishing—and it’s set to grow to $162 billion by 2030.

But to meet high demand, more innovation is needed to scale up and achieve these estimates. This infographic from the Very Good Food Company (VGFC) looks at five opportunities for innovation that could reshape the plant-based food industry.

#1: Protein Sourcing

Do you know where your protein comes from? Among the commercially available plant-based protein ingredients today, a majority are made from just 2% of the 150 plant species that drive the global food supply chain.

Of these, just 12 provide 75% of the world’s plant-based food. These statistics also leave out the 250,000 or more plant species that aren’t utilized in agriculture today—leaving plenty of room for exploration.

Discovering new sources of plant-based proteins could help expand product offerings, potentially boosting taste as well as texture.

#2: Protein (Read more...)

5 Opportunities for Innovation in the Plant-Based Food Market


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by The Very Good Food Company (VGFC)

5 Opportunities for Innovation in the Plant-Based Food Market

From an increasing number of people claiming to be flexitarian to more alternatives product options hitting the shelves, the popularity of plant-based food has been skyrocketing—resulting in a consumer base that is far bigger than just vegetarians and vegans.

What’s more, plant-based meat has been called the “best climate investment” of late. It’s no wonder that the plant-based food market is flourishing—and it’s set to grow to $162 billion by 2030.

But to meet high demand, more innovation is needed to scale up and achieve these estimates. This infographic from the Very Good Food Company (VGFC) looks at five opportunities for innovation that could reshape the plant-based food industry.

#1: Protein Sourcing

Do you know where your protein comes from? Among the commercially available plant-based protein ingredients today, a majority are made from just 2% of the 150 plant species that drive the global food supply chain.

Of these, just 12 provide 75% of the world’s plant-based food. These statistics also leave out the 250,000 or more plant species that aren’t utilized in agriculture today—leaving plenty of room for exploration.

Discovering new sources of plant-based proteins could help expand product offerings, potentially boosting taste as well as texture.

#2: Protein (Read more...)

Exploring The Consumer Potential of Plant-Based Alternatives



10 things investors should know about the plant-based food market Part 1 of 6
Why the 2020s are a watershed decade for plant-based alternatives Part 2 of 6
Plant-based meat vs. animal meat Part 3 of 6
 From bean to burger 4 of 6
Plant-based consumer potential 5 of 6
5 innovations in plant-based technology 6 of 6

The following content is sponsored by The Very Good Food Company

Exploring The Consumer Potential of Plant-Based Alternatives

Plant-based alternatives have exploded in recent years, and by 2030 the total market value is predicted to surpass a whopping $161 billion. The steady growth of this market goes hand-in-hand with another trend: consumers are increasingly being spoilt for choice.

Alternatives products are expanding and evolving in order to offer the same variety as the conventional meat market. Innovative technologies are helping new plant-based products rival animal products in look, taste, texture, and even nutrition.

This infographic from the Very Good Food Company (VGFC) provides a detailed look at the range of plant-based alternatives that could take the market’s consumer potential to the next level.

The Universe of Plant-Based Alternatives

There are four major categories for plant-based meat: natural meat mimickers, functional meat substitutes, meatless meat, and vegetable-forward products. How do they stack up?

Natural meat mimickersProvide meatless products with a savory mouthfeel, and are naturally high in fiber /proteinExamples: Legumes e.g. beans peas, lentils, pressed vegetables, mushrooms, jackfruit
Functional meat substitutesMay not taste exactly like meat, but have similar textures and flavorsExamples: Textured vegetable protein e.g. soya chunks, Unprocessed binders e.g. zucchini, carrot, coconut, beans, tofu, tempeh, seitan
Meatless meatReplicates meat’s typical characteristics, sometimes by combining natural meat mimickers and functional meat substitutesExamples: Impossible Burger,
Beyond Burger

These products appeal to "flexitarian" consumers, but can be highly processed
Vegetable-forwardDoesn’t try to replicate meat exactly, (Read more...)

How Does Animal Meat Compare to Plant-Based Meat?



10 things investors should know about the plant-based food market Part 1 of 6
Why the 2020s are a watershed decade for plant-based alternatives Part 2 of 6
Plant-based meat vs. animal meat Part 3 of 6
 From bean to burger 4 of 6
Plant-based consumer potential 5 of 6
5 innovations in plant-based technology 6 of 6

The following content is sponsored by The Very Good Food Company

plant-based meat infographic part 3

How Does Animal Meat Compare to Plant-Based Meat?

Plant-based alternatives are no longer for vegetarians and vegans alone. In recent years, they’re appealing to many people who are cutting out, or cutting down their personal meat consumption.

Whether you consider yourself one of these people or simply recognize the rise of this trend, this infographic from the Very Good Food Company (VGFC) explores three key reasons why the plant-based market is growing, and how it compares to animal meat.

It is Part 3 in a series that provides investors with everything they need to know about participating in this exciting space.

Plant-Based Meat: A Flexitarian Choice of Younger Generations

In an online survey of consumers, over one-third considered themselves “flexitarian”—eating mostly plant-based diets, with the occasional meat consumption. In fact, among Americans eating less meat, 36% are directly replacing these products with plant-based alternatives.

This is being primarily driven by younger generations, who show significant preferences for plant-based lifestyles:

GenerationAlready regularly eating plant-basedTrying to eat more plant-based
Millennials79%30%
Gen Z79%60%

It’s no wonder then, that the plant-based food market is set to sprout by nearly 5x within the next decade, expected to reach $162 billion by 2030. The top three reasons that consumers are transitioning to plant-based diets are health consciousness, environment concerns, and overall costs. How does animal meat compare to plant-based meat in these key areas?

1. Public Health and (Read more...)

Next Gen Foods to launch its plant-based chicken in the U.S. after raising a $20M seed extension from investors like GGV



Singapore-based Next Gen Foods will bring its plant-based chicken alternative to the United States after raising a $20 million seed extension. Investors included GGV Capital, agriculture and food tech-focused Bits x Bites, food and beverage company Yeo Hiap Seng, entrepreneur and “Blitzscaling” author Chris Yeh and English footballer Dele Alli.

Returning investors include Temasek, which led Next Gen Foods’ original $10 million seed round, announced in February, and K3 Ventures. The first $10 million was already the largest seed funding ever raised by a plant-based food tech company, based on data from Pitchbook, and now the round totals $30 million. Part of the funding will be used to fill 50 roles in the U.S. for its research and development, sales, supply chain and finance and marketing teams. 

Next Gen also announced changes to its leadership team. Co-founder Timo Recker is moving from his chief executive officer position to chairman, while Andre Menezes, another founder, will take over the CEO spot. Former Temasek director Rohit Bhattacharya will join the startup as its chief financial officer. 

Next Gen’s chicken alternative, called TiNDLE, launched in Asia through partnerships with restaurants and is now served in more than 70 locations in Singapore, Hong Kong and Macau. Over the next 12 months, Next Gen will take a similar approach as it enters the U.S., working with food services in cities to develop TiNDLE dishes for their menus. Eventually it (Read more...)

Plant-based food startup Next Gen lands $10M seed round from investors including Temasek



Singapore is quickly turning into a hub for food-tech startups, partly because of government initiatives supporting the development of meat alternatives. One of the newest entrants is Next Gen, which will launch its plant-based “chicken” brand, called TiNDLE, in Singaporean restaurants next month. The company announced today that it has raised $10 million in seed funding from investors including Temasek, K3 Ventures, EDB New Ventures (an investment arm of the Singapore Economic Development Board), NX-Food, FEBE Ventures and Blue Horizon.

Next Gen claims this is the largest seed round ever raised by a plant-based food tech company, based on data from PitchBook. This is the first time the startup has taken external investment, and the funding exceeded its original target of $7 million. Next Gen was launched last October by Timo Recker and Andre Menezes, with $2.2 million of founder capital.

Next Gen’s first product is called TiNDLE Thy, an alternative to chicken thighs. Its ingredients include water, soy, wheat, oat fiber, coconut oil and methylcellulose, a culinary binder, but the key to its chicken-like flavor is a proprietary blend of plant-based fats, like sunflower oil, and natural flavors that allows it to cook like chicken meat.

Menezes, Next Gen’s chief operating officer, told TechCrunch that the company’s goal is to be the global leader in plant-based chicken, the way Impossible and Beyond are known for their burgers.

“Consumers and chefs want texture in chicken, the taste and aroma, and that is largely related to chicken fat, (Read more...)