Category: generation x

Visualizing U.S. Household Debt, by Generation


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


The Generational Power Index
The Generational Power Index
Introducing our new index, which ranks U.S. generations on their economic, political, and cultural influence.

>> Download the Report (.pdf)

U.S. household debt by generation

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The Briefing

  • Generation X is the most indebted generation on average, with $140,643 of household debt
  • Younger generations are witnessing their debts growing at a greater pace relative to older Americans

Visualizing U.S. Household Debt, by Generation

The year 2020 could be categorized as one where debt grew across the board. In the U.S., every generation except the Silent Generation saw their debts rise in the last year.

But how much debt does each generational household owe?

Generation20192020Growth (%)
Generation Z (18-24)$9,593$16,04367.2%
Millennials (25-40)$78,396$87,44811.5%
Generation X (41-56)$135,841$140,6433.5%
Baby Boomers (57-75)$96,984$97,2900.3%
Silent Generation (76+)$43,255$41,281-4.6%

Gen X are the most indebted Americans followed by the Baby Boomers. The breakdown of debt by age group suggests the typical American’s debts grow with adulthood to a certain age, at which point it begins to taper off.

(Read more...)

Book: Generation X


This post is by Brad Feld from Feld Thoughts


Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture is weekend reading for anyone who wants to understand me and my generation.

I was born in 1965 – right at the beginning of the transition from “Boomers” to “Xers.” I’m glad my parents had me in 1965 instead of 1964, where I’d spend my life arguing (maybe with myself) that I’m not a boomer.

A millennial friend of mine didn’t know anything about Generation X, so I sent her a copy of the book. I suppose I was teasing her too much about being a millennial, which was just me mostly being a typical ironic Gen X slacker.

I reread Generation X a few weeks ago, and it held up. The definitions in the margins made me flash back to phrases we used in my early 20s. Douglas Copeland’s brilliant imagination shines throughout. And, at 55, I’ve become comfortable saying “Kids today …” which is what I’m sure my parents (and the boomers) said about me and my generation.

This week sucked emotionally. The Boulder shooting on Monday took the wind completely out of Amy and me. It’s Friday, and I’m winding down for the weekend. Work was intense, so I didn’t have a lot of time to feel my feelings. We were in the car for a while this morning driving back to Boulder from Aspen, so I let myself settle into how I felt. Now that I’m not shocked anymore, the best word I can come up with is “sad.” (Read more...)