Category: assets

Visualizing Americans’ Financial Assets by Age



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The following content is sponsored by Personal Capital

Visualizing Americans’ Financial Assets by Age

What do your account balances look like? Chances are you’ll answer that question differently if you’re a new graduate versus if you’re a retiree.

As we progress through life stages and our earning power changes, our finances will naturally evolve. In this graphic from Personal Capital, we look at a breakdown of financial assets by age. It’s the second in a three-part series that explores the spending and saving of Americans.

What Are Financial Assets?

Before we take a look at the data, it’s key to understand what financial assets are. Financial assets are non-physical assets that are typically liquid. This means they can be easily exchanged for cash. They derive their value from their contractual claim on an underlying entity, such as an ownership share in a company.

Some common examples are:

  • Cash
  • Certificates of deposit
  • Bonds
  • Mutual funds
  • Stocks

They do not include physical assets such as real estate, vehicles, or commodities, which have an inherent value due to their physical attributes.

A Breakdown by Decade

We calculated the breakdown of financial assets from the anonymized data of Personal Capital users, who tend to have a higher-than-average net worth. Here are the median balances for each account type by age.

Account Type20s30s40s50s60s70s
Cash$9,233$20,485$28,684$34,347$45,662$30,784
Cryptocurrency-$13,600----
Education Savings Plans-$23,719$65,169$74,511--
ESPP/ESOP/Stock (Read more...)

This Infographic Breaks Down Careers In Finance, From Hedge Funds to M&A


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


Finance Careers infographic

Careers In Corporate Finance, From Hedge Funds to M&A

Corporate finance is a key pillar on which modern markets and economies have been built. And this complex ecosystem consists of a number of important sectors, which can lead to lucrative career avenues.

From lending to investment banking, and private equity to hedge funds, the graphic above by Wall Street Prep breaks down the key finance careers and paths that people can take.

Let’s take a further look at the unique pieces of this finance ecosystem.

The Lending Business

Lending groups provide much needed capital to corporations, often in the form of term loans or revolvers. These can be part of short and long-term operations or for events less anticipated like the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in companies shoring up $222 billion in revolving lines of credit within the first month.

Investment Banking

Next, is investment banking, which can split into three main areas:

  1. Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A): There’s a lot of preparation and paperwork involved whenever corporations merge or make acquisitions. For that reason, this is a crucial service that investment banks provide, and its importance is reflected in the enormous fees recognized. The top five U.S. investment banks collect $10.2 billion in M&A advisory fees, representing 40% of the $25 billion in global M&A fees per year.
  2. Loan Syndications: Some $16 billion in loan syndication fees are collected annually by investment banks. Loan syndications are when multiple lenders fund one borrower, which can occur when the loan (Read more...)

Who are the Longest Serving Active CEOs in the S&P 500?


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


Longest serving CEOs

Can I share this graphic?
Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.
When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.
Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

The Briefing

  • The longest serving CEOs highlighted have remained in their position for an average of 33 years
  • The best performing CEOs in 2019 held their jobs for 2x the average duration of S&P 500 CEOs

Who are the Longest Serving Active CEOs in the S&P 500?

Have you ever wondered which chief executive officer has remained at their position the longest? As an investor, you might be interested to know that studies have linked CEO duration with superior stock returns.

One study in particular from the University of Sydney looked at some 19,000 CEOs across the NYSE and NASDAQ from 1992-2016 and concluded:

“A one year increase in CEO tenure, on average, increases future stock returns by 0.029 percentage points, and suggests that longer CEO tenure has robust positive predictive power on cross-sectional stock returns.”

The data in this piece highlights several of the most tenured CEOs in the S&P 500. Warren Buffett is the longest serving leader of the bunch, having maintained his position for over half a century.

CEODurationCompany
Warren (Read more...)

Ranked: Big Tech CEO Insider Trading During the First Half of 2021


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


Ranked: Big Tech CEO Insider Trading During the First Half of 2021

Big Tech CEO Insider Trading During The First Half of 2021

When CEOs of major companies are selling their shares, investors can’t help but notice.

After all, these decisions have a direct effect on the personal wealth of these insiders, which can say plenty about their convictions with respect to the future direction of the companies they run.

Considering that Big Tech stocks are some of the most popular holdings in today’s portfolios, and are backed by a collective $5.3 trillion in institutional investment, how do the CEOs of these organizations rank by their insider selling?

CEOStockShares Sold H1 2021Value of Shares ($M)
Jeff BezosAmazon (AMZN)2.0 million$6,600
Mark ZuckerbergFacebook (FB)7.1 million$2,200
Satya NadellaMicrosoft (MSFT)278,694
$65
Sundar PichaiGoogle (GOOGL)27,000$62
Tim CookApple (AAPL)0$0

Breaking Down Insider Trading, by CEO

Let’s dive into the insider trading activity of each Big Tech CEO:

Jeff Bezos

During the first half of 2021, Jeff Bezos sold 2 million shares of Amazon worth $6.6 billion.

This activity was spread across 15 different transactions, representing an average of $440 million per transaction. Altogether, this ranks him first by CEO insider selling, by total dollar proceeds. Bezos’s time as CEO of Amazon came to an end shortly after the half way mark for the year.

Mark Zuckerberg

In second place is Mark Zuckerberg, who has been significantly busier selling than the rest.

In the first half of 2021, he unloaded (Read more...)

Bitcoin is the Fastest Asset to Reach a $1 Trillion Market Cap


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


Bitcoin fastest asset to $1 trillion

The Briefing

  • Bitcoin (BTC) hit a $1 trillion market cap in just 12 years, making it the fastest asset to do so
  • Investor sentiment towards BTC appears to be at extreme bullishness, with the asset adding roughly $500 billion in market cap just in 2021

Bitcoin is the Fastest Asset to Reach $1 Trillion

The world is moving forward at an accelerated pace. Historically, it’s taken multiple decades for companies to be worth $1 trillion. For bitcoin, it took just 12 short years to reach such a milestone.

To help put things into perspective, here’s a look at how long it took America’s biggest tech companies to reach the $1 trillion market cap.

AssetTime To Reach $1 TrillionCurrent Market Cap
Microsoft44 years$1.9 trillion
Apple42 years$2.2 trillion
Amazon24 years$1.7 trillion
Google21 years$1.5 trillion
Bitcoin12 years$1.1 trillion

Market caps as of April 12, 2021

Extreme Bullish Sentiment

Bitcoin has been subject to widespread commotion in markets.

At the start of 2021, the cryptocurrency had a more modest market cap of $500 billion, but has gained more than another $500 billion since. An onslaught of headlines has contributed to extremely bullish investor sentiment, including:

1. CEOs begin to show interest
Elon Musk and Jack Dorsey have made sizable investments in bitcoin through Tesla and Square, respectively. It’s estimated the gain from Tesla’s $1.5 billion bitcoin investment was greater than the profits from the entirety of their business in 2020.

2. New (Read more...)

What The Data Says About Wealth Inequality


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


wealth inequality data in America

The Briefing

  • Today, the top 1% of U.S. households own 31.2% of total wealth
  • Data going back over 200 years suggests that wealth inequality in both the U.S. and Europe reached its peak in the early 1900s

What The Data Says About Wealth Inequality

Wealth inequality has gone through peaks and troughs throughout history.

Most recently, in the decade between 2010 and 2020, the top 1% of U.S. households’ portion of wealth has gone from 28.6% to 31.2%.

However, when expressed in raw dollars, things begin to look different. Wealth during the same period for the 1% went from approximately $17.5 trillion to $35 trillion. Meanwhile, the total wealth pool rose from $60 trillion to $112 trillion.

In other words, all households by category have amassed wealth during the same period, albeit at different rates.

Household Wealth PercentileAnnual Growth in Wealth (CAGR)
Top 1%6.54%
90-99%5.75%
50-90%4.97%
Bottom 50%3.30%

Source: The Federal Reserve

Drivers Of Wealth Inequality

The longest bull market in history, which went from March 2009 to February 2020, has been a big driver for the recent divergence. The U.S. composition of wealth for the top 1% of households skews towards corporate equities and mutual funds, of which they collectively own $14 trillion. By contrast, the bottom 50% of households own $0.16 trillion.

It’s often said a stock market correction is long overdue. Since the top 1% of households clearly have the most skin in the game, if one (Read more...)

The Ballooning Valuations In Private Equity Deals


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


ballooning valuations in private equity deals

The Briefing

  • Private equity (PE) deal valuations by EV/EBITDA are increasingly rich and are hitting higher double-digit figures
  • 2021 is expected to be another home run year for PE, with 20% of buyouts estimated to be priced above 20x EV/EBITDA

The Ballooning Valuations In Private Equity Deals

Private equity is getting increasingly expensive. As a result, the pricing of an average deal today, by the EV/EBITDA metric, is expected to be at a premium relative to the last decade.

The EV/EBIDTA ratio breaks down into two parts:

  • Enterprise Value (EV): Adding debt to market capitalization, while subtracting cash gives us the enterprise value. This gives us the total value of a company.
  • EBITDA: Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization or, EBITDA, provides a popular way to look at earnings. By removing these expenses, we obtain a clearer look at operating performance.

Overall, EV/EBITDA shows the relationship between a company’s total value and its earnings, and is often seen as the price-to-earnings ratio’s sophisticated sibling, used to view companies the way acquirers would.

However, the EV component is not necessarily intuitive, so let’s expand a little on it:

Why is Debt Added Back to Enterprise Value?

To acquire a company completely, one must pay out all stakeholders in order to reach the final cost of the acquisition. This includes the stock (equity holders) and the debt holders, subsequently, adding back the market value debt to market cap does just this.

Why is Cash Subtracted from Enterprise Value?

Subtracting (Read more...)

Visualizing Net Worth by Age in America


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


net worth by age

Can I share this graphic?
Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.
When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.
Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

The Briefing

  • The age group with the highest average net worth in the U.S. is the 65-74 group, with $1.22 million in 2019 dollars.
  • There is a significant gap between median and mean (average) net worth in nearly every age category, suggesting that mean values are skewed upwards by outliers.

Visualizing Net Worth by Age in America

Calculating the net worth of individuals often seems like the kind of math reserved only for the richest people in the world like Elon Musk or Jack Ma. But as the proverbial pie gets bigger, the net worth of the average American household gets bigger as well.

This chart uses data from the U.S. Federal Reserve Bulletin to reveal median and average household net worth across different age categories in 2019.

Average vs. Median Net Worth

A person’s net worth is a sum of their assets and liabilities. Here’s a closer look at net worth by age in the U.S.

AgeMedian Net Worth 2019Average Net Worth 2019Difference
Younger than 35$13,900$76,300>5x
35-44$91,300$436,200 (Read more...)