Category: Apple

The problem with Facebook


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Boywithadaimonring
 Photo courtesy of Emad/Stablity.ai via Twitter

The Verge reports on the internal challenges at Meta nee Facebook and how company is trying to deal with it. Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder and CEO of Meta has painted  Apple as enemy number one. I mean, why not. A slight change has lopped off billions in revenue and market capitalization.”Apple is going to be a competitor for us, not just as a product but philosophically.,” Zuck said. “It’s a very deep, philosophical competition about what direction the internet should go in.”

I am unsure what direction Apple wants to take us, but I can bet my last dollar; I don’t want to be in the future of the Internet that Zuckerberg is trying to build.

Our north star is can we get a billion people into the metaverse doing hundreds of dollars a piece in digital commerce by the end of the decade? If we do that, we’ll build a business that is as big as our current ad business within this decade. I think that’s a really exciting thing. I think a big part of how you do that is by pushing the open metaverse forward, which is what we’re going to do.

Meta’s north star doesn’t take into account value to the users, the benefit to the larger ecosystem or even the experience. Instead it is about how the company’s users time can be translated into dollars for the sole benefit for Meta. So, yes, there is a philosophical difference between them (Read more...)

Animation: The Rise and Fall of Popular Web Browsers Since 1994


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Animation: The Rise and Fall of Popular Web Browsers Since 1994

In its early stages, the internet was a highly technical interface that most people had difficulty navigating. But that all changed when the Mosaic web browser entered the scene in 1993.

Mosaic was one of the first “user-friendly” internet portals—although by today’s standards, the browser was actually quite difficult to access. Comparatively, modern browsers in high use today have changed exponentially.

This animated graphic by James Eagle chronicles the evolution of the web browser market, showing the rise and fall of various internet portals from January 1994 to March 2022.

The 1990s: From Mosaic to Netscape

In the early 90s, Mosaic was by far the most dominant web browser. At the time, about 97% of all internet searches were done through this popular web portal.

Web browser% Share (January 1994)
Mosaic97.0%
Other3.0%

Mosaic was the first web browser to display images directly on a page in line with text. Earlier browsers loaded pictures as separate files, which meant users have to click, download, and open a new file in order to view them.

The pioneering portal was created by a team of university undergrads at the University of Illinois, led by 21-year-old Marc Andreessen. When Andreessen graduated, he went on to be the co-founder of Mosaic Communications Corporation, which evolved into Netscape Communications Corporation, the company that created Netscape Navigator.

Netscape was essentially a new and improved version of Mosaic, but since the University of (Read more...)

The future of tech as I see it


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Captured at San Francisco on 27 Feb 2022 by Om Malik

I recently sat down to talk with my friend Howard Lindzon on his podcast Panic with Friends to discuss the future of technology. Howard has shared the show notes on his blog. I wanted to draw out three core themes I addressed in my conversation, and they are all correlated. 

I have a long-standing approach to holistically understanding technologies and their impact. I look at pure technologies such as semiconductors & networks and think about their impact on products, behavior, and change. At the same time, I look at our behaviors today and how they disrupt the present technology ecosystems. 

Much of my current and future enthusiasm stems from exciting work underway in the semiconductor world, with Apple’s M1 being the most visible example of the possibilities unlocked by cheap computing, cheap GPU, and machine learning capabilities. It is not just Apple — the entire semiconductor ecosystem is experiencing change. 

*** 

Value (of technology), not valuations, matters most.

When we try to predict the future, we usually get it wrong. It is just so because we only have the present and past to use us as references. For example, when we think about web3, we look for analogs. “What’s the new Twitter?” without ever wondering do we even need a new Twitter. Or will there be something else that will help us replace it as a source of information? No one thought TikTok would be a competitor to (Read more...)

Some Observations on WWDC 2022


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


These were a series of tweets in response to the WWDC keynote presentation. These were off-the-cuff observations, but I still feel the same at the end of the week, and my opinion hasn’t changed.


Clamping the iPhone to the top of an Apple computer is everything right (continuity camera & desktop view), and what’s wrong with Apple and its product creativity in a nutshell. What an unlike Apple solution to showcase in a keynote event.


So Apple can edit, recall, and all sorts of fancy stuff in new iMessages at the scale of billions of messages. Why is it that we can’t do “edit” on Twitter? Come on, Twitter engineering, time to explain in plain English why it is so hard. So we don’t bug you again 😜 (Actually, it is a complicated and complex problem to solve. So despite my frustration, I understand the enormity of the task and how it fundamentally changes the behaviors on Twitter.)


Every Apple Keynote event reflects the emptiness that is professional tech news media. A terabyte of nothingness. You have to visit M.J. Tsai’s blog if you want an excellent quick recap. Or read @stevesi comments on Twitter.


The big innovation for me: M2. They are getting so far ahead of their rivals that competition is comically eating their dust. The price/performance gap is getting wider compared to the other guys. Rest is “futzing,” as @stevesi says!

M2 uses Apple custom Arm silicon & is built on a 5nm process. M2 has (Read more...)

Animation: How the Mobile Phone Market Has Evolved Over 30 Years


This post is by Omri Wallach from Visual Capitalist


How The Mobile Phone Market Has Evolved Since 1993

The mobile phone landscape looks drastically different today than it did three decades ago.

In 1993, Motorola accounted for more than half of the mobile phone market. But by 2021, its market share had shrunk to just 2.2%. How did this happen, and how has the mobile industry changed over the last 30 years?

This video by James Eagle chronicles the evolution of the mobile phone market, showing the rise and fall of various mobile phone manufacturers. The data spans from December 1992 to December 2021.

The Early Days of Mobile Phones

Motorola is known for being a pioneer in the mobile phone industry.

In 1983, the American company launched one of the world’s first commercially available mobile phones—the DynaTAC 8000X. The revolutionary analog phone cost nearly $4,000 and offered users up to 30 minutes of talk time before needing to be recharged.

Motorola went on to launch a few more devices over the next few years, like the MicroTAC 9800X in 1989 and the International 3200 in 1992, and quickly became a dominant player in the nascent industry. In the early days of the market, the company’s only serious competitor was Finnish multinational Nokia, which had acquired the early mobile network pioneer Mobira.

But by the mid-1990s, other competitors like Sony and Siemens started to gain some solid footing, which chipped away at Motorola’s dominance. In September 1995, the company’s market share was down to 32.1%.

Mobile Phone Market (Read more...)

How Do Big Tech Giants Make Their Billions?


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


A Breakdown of Big Tech Revenue Streams

How Do Big Tech Giants Make Their Billions?

In 2021, the Big Five tech giants—Apple, Amazon, Google (Alphabet), Meta, and Microsoft—generated a combined $1.4 trillion in revenue.

What are the sources of this revenue, and how does it breakdown?

Below, we’ll dive into the main ways that these big tech giants generate revenue, and take a look at how much their revenues have increased in recent years.

Breaking Down Big Tech’s Revenue Streams

As we’ve mentioned in previous editions of this graphic, there are two main ways that big tech companies generate revenue:

  • They either sell you a product
  • Or sell you as the product to advertisers

Apple, Microsoft, and Amazon fall into the first category—like most traditional businesses, these companies offer customers a physical (or digital) product in exchange for money. More than half of Apple’s revenue comes from iPhone sales, Azure cloud services generate almost a third of Microsoft’s total, and Amazon’s online stores account for nearly 50% of the company’s revenue.

On the other hand, Meta and Alphabet do things a bit differently. Rather than selling an actual product, these two tech giants make most of their money by selling their audience’s attention. Nearly 98% of Meta’s revenue comes from Facebook ads, and 81% of Google’s revenue comes from advertising on various Google products.

However, despite their varying ways of generating sales, these companies all have one thing in common: revenues have soared in recent years.

The Pandemic Has Sped Up Growth

Amidst rising unemployment and pandemic-induced (Read more...)

So who else can buy Twitter?


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om



Since everyone has decided that Elon Musk’s $54-a-share offer for Twitter is just a troll, the question remains who else can buy the company? Is there a suitor who can digest Twitter and deal with all its baggage? Or is the company destined to be a middling underachiever?

Twitter had adopted the poison pill plan that would make it difficult for Musk to achieve its goals and increase his stake beyond 15 percent ownership of Twitter. If he increases his stake to above 15 percent, then Twitter has the right to sell more shares to other buyers at a discount. That is, Twitter will find a white knight. The New York Post reported that private equity giant Thoma Bravo was considering a bid. The firm, which manages $100 billion, definitely has the resources to friend Twitter and mute Musk. 

If not Thoma Bravo, then some other private equity firm could make a bid for Twitter. They obviously would know that they are buying an underperforming asset and squeezing out operational inefficiencies. A PE buyer would likely find a better management team than one currently in place, something the current board of directors should have done anyway. 



When viewed with a broader lens, Twitter doesn’t have many options. Apple won’t want the mess on its hands. Thanks to its size and corporate needs, it is (Read more...)

How Much Radiation is Emitted by Popular Smartphones?


This post is by Anshool Deshmukh from Visual Capitalist


Infographic showing the Radiation emissions of popular smartphones

Radiation Emissions of Popular Smartphones

Smartphones have become an integral part of our everyday lives. From work and school to daily tasks, these handheld devices have brought everything into the palm of our hands.

Most people spend 5-6 hours on their phones each day. And, given that our phones emit a tiny amount of radiation, we’re exposing ourselves to radiation for hours each day.

But different phones emit different amounts of radiation.

With the help of data collected by the German Federal Office of Radiation Protection, we visualize the radiation emissions of some popular smartphones in the market today.

Radiation and SAR Values of Smartphones

Smartphones and other mobile devices emit tiny amounts of radiofrequency (RF) radiation. Humans can absorb this radiation when the smartphone is being used or is lying dormant anywhere near their bodies.

The parameter used to measure phone radiation emissions is the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). It is the unit of measurement that represents the quantity of electromagnetic energy absorbed by the body when using a mobile device.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has set radiation standards for cell phones at 1.6 watts per kilogram, measured over the 1 gram of tissue that is absorbing the most signal.

SAR values are calculated at the ear (speaking on the phone) and at the body (kept in your pocket). For the purposes of this article, we’ve used the former calculations.

Smartphones With the Highest Levels of Radiation Emissions

The Motorola Edge has the (Read more...)

Slow Horses


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


“I think we consider too much the good luck of the early bird and not enough the bad luck of the early worm,” an observation by Franklin D. Roosevelt came to mind when I was watching the first two episodes of Slow Horses. It is a new television series that debuted on Apple TV+ this past weekend.

Slow Horses is a spy-genre novel of the same name by Mick Herron, an author widely regarded as a worthy inheritor of the crown worn for decades by John Le Carre. There is a special reason why I like Herron, as pointed out in an earlier blog post.

If le Carre’s books gave you a glimpse into the art of spycraft from a professional, Herron does a great job of giving a contemporary feel to his books. This is a unique skill — we live in a society with an increasing attention deficit, and the recent past gives the book more relevance. This blurring of reality and imagination is quite a heady mix, so I can’t stop reading Herron’s books. 

It all starts with Slow Horses. The novel and the series feature a motley crew of characters discarded by Britain’s MI5 agency for one reason or the other. They are all banished to a branch of the spy agency dubbed Slough House, though it is neither in Slough nor is it a house. Instead, it is an anonymous, dilapidated four-story walk-up over what we call a bodega and a Chinese restaurant.

The (Read more...)

The Password Defense


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


U.S. President Joe Biden has informed Americans that a potential cyberwar with Russia is likely. And we should be prepared for the consequences and havoc it can cause on such a society. It is common knowledge many of our industries, corporations, and infrastructure services, such as the electrical grid, are weak and can fall victim to large-scale attacks. Even Americans have weak defenses on our computers.  

“Given the administration’s stellar track record in predicting Russian moves in its attack on Ukraine, we should take this warning seriously,” wrote Richard Bennett, a writer, and analyst focusing on telecom and network. “Cyberwar is a business conducted by firms and individual actors with a rapidly changing arsenal of software-based tools.” 

The timing of the White House release was at best a coincidence, and at worst, curious since it came on the same day Apple experienced a massive outage in its online services. To be very clear, what I am about to write is hypothetical, and I am putting it in my “what if” buckets. 

An odd and somewhat crazy thought crossed my mind — what if the outage resulted from an attempt to compromise Apple’s crown jewel — its Keychain, end-to-end encryption, and the iMessage. Like many, I have had blind faith in Apple’s capabilities to protect my privacy and data. I am not alone, and many folks in the government and corporate America have faith in Apple’s capabilities. So this keychain could be a single point of information security failure that could (Read more...)