Category: Alsop Louie Partners

Meet The VC Who’s Betting On A Better World In 3D: Gilman Louie



by Giovanni Rodriguez
Originally published in Forbes. Reprinted with permission from the author.

On a bright weekday morning last Spring, I found myself stranded outside a small, non-descript building on Howard Street in San Francisco, desperately trying to figure out how to get in. I got the address right, according to Google Maps. But there was no sign on the building, and no obvious way to enter. Three thoughts/feelings occurred to me. One, an easier portal into the space would have been welcome. Second, the experience felt like a test. Third — and perhaps the most persistent sentiment, because I feel it to this day — it was actually an appropriate experience because of the people inside that building.

Perhaps it was a test. The people inside that building were Stewart Alsop and Gilman Louie, founders of the fast emerging VC firm Alsop Louie Partners (one of their first big scores: Twitch, which sold for almost $1 billion in 2014; more about that at the end of the article). It’s a special firm. I knew Stewart from a startup he invested in more than 10 years ago, and recently met up with him to check out one of his most recent investments, a startup called Hover which enables contractors to use a smartphone to create an accurate 3D model of a home and which they can later use to spec, price, and do work on the home. After the meeting, Stewart and I chatted briefly. I was impressed, I said. (Read more...)

Meet The VC Who’s Betting On A Better World In 3D: Gilman Louie



by Giovanni Rodriguez
Originally published in Forbes. Reprinted with permission from the author.

On a bright weekday morning last Spring, I found myself stranded outside a small, non-descript building on Howard Street in San Francisco, desperately trying to figure out how to get in. I got the address right, according to Google Maps. But there was no sign on the building, and no obvious way to enter. Three thoughts/feelings occurred to me. One, an easier portal into the space would have been welcome. Second, the experience felt like a test. Third — and perhaps the most persistent sentiment, because I feel it to this day — it was actually an appropriate experience because of the people inside that building.

Perhaps it was a test. The people inside that building were Stewart Alsop and Gilman Louie, founders of the fast emerging VC firm Alsop Louie Partners (one of their first big scores: Twitch, which sold for almost $1 billion in 2014; more about that at the end of the article). It’s a special firm. I knew Stewart from a startup he invested in more than 10 years ago, and recently met up with him to check out one of his most recent investments, a startup called Hover which enables contractors to use a smartphone to create an accurate 3D model of a home and which they can later use to spec, price, and do work on the home. After the meeting, Stewart and I chatted briefly. I was impressed, I said. (Read more...)

Gilman Louie: Cybersecurity: Time for Action



Gilman Louie on what this current administration must address in order to meet the growing cyber challenges of the 21st century. This article was originally published on The Cipher Brief

U.S. failure to fully develop and implement a comprehensive cyber security strategy created the perfect opportunity for Russia to attack the Democratic National Committee computer network, and enabled them to meddle and interfere with the U.S. presidential election.

Years of bickering by federal agencies – over which agency was in charge, who had which jurisdictions, who was going to pay, what information could be shared, what should be the role of the private sector, privacy and liability concerns, and who should be accountable – has left the United States with numerous cyber vulnerabilities, so that any country, non-state actor, or trained individual with reasonable skills can attack this country with little to no consequence.

Our country has failed to take the necessary actions to protect and secure its digital infrastructure and assets. Over 80 percent of U.S. businesses are hacked every year; some of our most valuable military technologies, data, and intellectual property have been stolen; and 21.5 million personnel records, including numerous caches of security clearance information, have been hacked. This is not the result of technology failing, but of failed policies and leadership.

These failures have created a window for emboldened hackers.  Countries, as well as non-state actors, no longer attempt to cover their tracks. The lack of sufficient consequences, combined with increasing profitability, has made (Read more...)

Gilman Louie: Cybersecurity: Time for Action



Gilman Louie on what this current administration must address in order to meet the growing cyber challenges of the 21st century. This article was originally published on The Cipher Brief

U.S. failure to fully develop and implement a comprehensive cyber security strategy created the perfect opportunity for Russia to attack the Democratic National Committee computer network, and enabled them to meddle and interfere with the U.S. presidential election.

Years of bickering by federal agencies – over which agency was in charge, who had which jurisdictions, who was going to pay, what information could be shared, what should be the role of the private sector, privacy and liability concerns, and who should be accountable – has left the United States with numerous cyber vulnerabilities, so that any country, non-state actor, or trained individual with reasonable skills can attack this country with little to no consequence.

Our country has failed to take the necessary actions to protect and secure its digital infrastructure and assets. Over 80 percent of U.S. businesses are hacked every year; some of our most valuable military technologies, data, and intellectual property have been stolen; and 21.5 million personnel records, including numerous caches of security clearance information, have been hacked. This is not the result of technology failing, but of failed policies and leadership.

These failures have created a window for emboldened hackers.  Countries, as well as non-state actors, no longer attempt to cover their tracks. The lack of sufficient consequences, combined with increasing profitability, has made (Read more...)

Gilman Louie: The Art of the Deal – with China



Gilman Louie and Joseph DeTrani address how the new administration can navigate the U.S. – China relationship. This article was originally published on The Cipher Brief.

President Trump said he wants to improve relations with China, but he has expressed concern with China’s theft of intellectual property, unfair taxes for U.S. companies in China, currency manipulation, product dumping and failing to reign in North Korea.  He took a congratulatory call from the President of Taiwan and questioned the “One China Policy.”  Many of his appointees have strong and divergent views on the issue.

Although the economies of the U.S. and China are mutually dependent, the possibility of a trade war cannot be dismissed.  Politically, tension in the South China Sea could purposely or accidentally devolve into military conflict.  Both scenarios can and should be avoided.

President Trump is an accomplished negotiator and in his book, The Art of the Deal, he describes several negotiating tactics that could be key to resetting U.S.-China relations. Here are a few we think are particularly applicable:

Think Big – Design a plan that benefits both the U.S. and China.  The U.S. has to modernize its manufacturing sector, return jobs lost to offshoring, incentivize U.S. companies to repatriate capital and invest that capital into infrastructure and manufacturing capacity – as well as open the Chinese market to U.S. goods, especially services.

While China has done well in some areas of consumer and manufacturing innovation, it needs to increase its innovation in all areas of (Read more...)