Day: November 21, 2022

The Twitter Advertiser Exodus


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


A $750,000 a month advertiser has left Twitter. One of hundreds. But in her post she explained the bases for the decision vis-a-vis her advertising investment in a neutral, non-ideological way. People picked up this post because it so powerfully predicts the demise of Twitter’s advertising business, already in freefall and now perhaps beyond recovery.

I’ve spent a lot of my career railing against the marriage of advertising and social media. It was once called “online community” or “social software”. an advertising business model almost inevitably leads to so many of the social ills we know so well. The implosion of Twitter allows us see this happening in real time. Given that Elon Musk explained that it was his intention in acquiring Twitter to make it the “free speech” platform, it was with supreme schadenfreude and satisfaction that I read the Techdirt post by Mike Masnick, Hey Elon: Let Me Help You Speed Run The Content Moderation Learning Curve, which those of us who have run user generated content sites have all been through.

The Advertiser Exodus is real. An alternate business model will be required. But the User Exodus is just as real. As @mulegirl on Twitter points out, it will require 93,750 paid users paying $8 per month to replace just this single $750,000 a month advertiser.

Which, in my opinion, is good and correct. I have always thought that the social media platforms should be much less profitable than they are, and that it is only (Read more...)

The Twitter Advertiser Exodus


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


A $750,000 a month advertiser has left Twitter. One of hundreds. But in her post she explained the bases for the decision vis-a-vis her advertising investment in a neutral, non-ideological way. People picked up this post because it so powerfully predicts the demise of Twitter’s advertising business, already in freefall and now perhaps beyond recovery.

I’ve spent a lot of my career railing against the marriage of advertising and social media. It was once called “online community” or “social software”. an advertising business model almost inevitably leads to so many of the social ills we know so well. The implosion of Twitter allows us see this happening in real time. Given that Elon Musks explained that it was his intention in acquiring to make it the “free speech” platform , it was with great schadenfreude and satisfaction that I enjoyed the Techdirt post by Mike Masnick, Hey Elon: Let Me Help You Speed Run The Content Moderation Learning Curve, which those of us who have run user generated content sites have all been through.

The Advertiser Exodus is real. An alternate business model will be required. But the User Exodus is just as real. As @mulegirl on Twitter points out, it will require 93,750 paid users paying $8 per month to replace just this single $750,000 a month advertiser.

Which, in my opinion, is good and correct. I have always thought that the social media platforms should be much less profitable than they are, and that it is only (Read more...)

A List of Non-Crazy Conservative Journalists and Commentators


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


It seems like a good time to post this list of non-crazy conservative journalists and commentators to follow online, given to me by my friend Jason Hirschhorn. I haven’t fully vetted these, and I welcome any comments on where these writers lie on the nuts/not nuts continuum, their general merits and/or shortcomings, whether or not they are actually conservative, which ones you read, and who is missing from this list. Many of these writers write for many publications, so if you find someone’s work interesting there’s likely more out there on different sites.

Yes, that is an Elephant Nutcracker.

The List:

George Will writes for the Washington Post

Nick Gillespie writes for Reason

SE Cupp appears on CNN

Matt Lewis writes for The Daily Beast

David Frum writers for the Atlantic

Ross Douthat writes for the NY Times.

Michael Gerson wrote for the Washington Post, but died just this week.

Peggy Noonan writes for the Wall Street Journal

Yural Levin writes for the National Review

A List of Non-Crazy Conservative Journalists and Commentators


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


It seems like a good time to post this list of non-crazy conservative journalists and commentators to follow online, given to me by my friend Jason Hirschhorn. I haven’t fully vetted these, and I welcome any comments on where these writers lie on the nuts/not nuts continuum, their general merits and/or shortcomings, whether or not they are actually conservative, which ones you read, and who is missing from this list. Many of these writers write for many publications, so if you find someone’s work interesting there’s likely more out there on different sites.

Yes, that is an Elephant Nutcracker.

The List:

George Will writes for the Washington Post

Nick Gillespie writes for Reason

SE Cupp appears on CNN

Matt Lewis writes for The Daily Beast

David Frum writers for the Atlantic

Ross Douthat writes for the NY Times.

Michael Gerson wrote for the Washington Post, but died just this week.

Peggy Noonan writes for the Wall Street Journal

Yural Levin writes for the National Review

Caterina.net 2022-11-21 18:00:41


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


  • An image from Dragon’s Delusion by Kongkee, which I saw this weekend at the Asian Art Museum.
  • Amazing Tagalog singers doing karaoke at Via Mare in Daly City on Friday night too, along side enormous portions of sinigang and chicken adobo. We tried all the delivery options for Filipino food in San Francisco, but none were anywhere near as good as Via Mare. But I didn’t know they also had live entertainment!
  • I found this article by Paul Krugman to be edifying on how Democrats can work with and around a Republican party that is more interested in investigating Hunter Biden than in governing, and who lack any kind of mandate other than thwarting Democrats, preventing the rich from paying too many taxes, and eliminating aid to people in need.
  • Yes, the imminent demise of Twitter, the departure of nearly all responsible parties, the readmission of Trump and the general malaise striking all the other social media platforms at the same are inspiring me to write my blog again. Hooray for Independent Online Media! Delighted.

Caterina.net 2022-11-21 18:00:41


This post is by Caterina Fake from Caterina.net


  • An image from Dragon’s Delusion by Kongkee, which I saw this weekend at the Asian Art Museum.
  • Amazing Tagalog singers doing karaoke at Via Mare in Daly City on Friday night too, along side enormous portions of sinigang and chicken adobo. We tried all the delivery options for Filipino food in San Francisco, but none were anywhere near as good as Via Mare. But I didn’t know they also had live entertainment!
  • I found this article by Paul Krugman to be edifying on how Democrats can work with and around a Republican party that is more interested in investigating Hunter Biden than in governing, and who lack any kind of mandate other than thwarting Democrats, preventing the rich from paying too many taxes, and eliminating aid to people in need.
  • Yes, the imminent demise of Twitter, the departure of nearly all responsible parties, the readmission of Trump and the general malaise striking all the other social media platforms at the same are inspiring me to write my blog again. Hooray for Independent Online Media! Delighted.

Visualizing the Five Drivers of Forest Loss


This post is by Govind Bhutada from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Carbon Streaming Corporation.

drivers of forest loss

The Briefing

  • On average, the world loses more than 20 million hectares of forests annually.
  • Agriculture and commodity-driven deforestation each account for approximately a quarter of annual forest loss.

Visualizing the Five Drivers of Forest Loss

The world has lost one-third of its forests since the ice age, and today, approximately 15 billion trees are cut down annually.

Forests are wellsprings of biodiversity and an essential buffer against climate change, absorbing billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year. Yet, forest loss continues to grow.

The above infographic sponsored by Carbon Streaming Corporation highlights the five primary drivers behind forest loss.

Deforestation vs. Degradation

‘Forest loss’ is a broad term that captures the impacts of both permanent deforestation and forest degradation. There is an important distinction between the two:

  • Permanent deforestation: Refers to the complete removal of trees or conversion of forests to another land use (like buildings), where forests cannot regrow.
  • Forest degradation: Refers to a reduction in the density of trees in the area without a change in land use. Forests are expected to regrow.

Forest degradation accounts for over 70% or 15 million hectares of annual forest loss. The other 30% of lost forests are permanently deforested.

Driving factorCategoryAverage annual forest loss (2001-2015, million hectares)
Commodity-driven deforestationPermanent deforestation5.7
UrbanizationPermanent deforestation0.1
Forestry productsForest degradation5.4
Shifting agricultureForest degradation5
WildfiresForest degradation4.8
TotalN/A (Read more...)

Team Building


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


Last week we gathered as a team in Venice Beach California. We do this at least twice a year — fly to a city, clear our calendars, and spend time together. No phones, no meetings, no rules. It’s an opportunity to go a level deeper with the people who are working on this project, better known as Collab Fund.

It was one of my favorite gatherings since starting the firm 12 years ago. Maybe the pandemic has left me craving more meaningful interactions or the fresh, ocean air – I am not sure. But it was highly productive.

We discussed all the usual things you might expect. How are we evolving as a firm? Is our thesis fresh/current? How can we better support portfolio companies? What do we want to be when we grow up?

If forced to summarize one key take-away from these discussions, it would be to continue to chart our own path. Study and learn from other great investors and firms, but do things our way.

Some of the highlights:

A wonderful session with Mark Suster. Mark is someone I’ve looked up to for a long time. A principled, hard-working, generous person. He leads by example and lets his performance speak for itself. His willingness to open up and speak candidly with our entire team about a wide range of topics was such a gift. He’s got an absolute treasure chest of knowledge.

IMG_3993.jpeg

Next up was a donut break! We couldn’t help but meet up with (Read more...)

Team Building


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


Last week we gathered as a team in Venice Beach California. We do this at least twice a year — fly to a city, clear our calendars, and spend time together. No phones, no meetings, no rules. It’s an opportunity to go a level deeper with the people who are working on this project, better known as Collab Fund.

It was one of my favorite gatherings since starting the firm 12 years ago. Maybe the pandemic has left me craving more meaningful interactions or the fresh, ocean air – I am not sure. But it was highly productive.

We discussed all the usual things you might expect. How are we evolving as a firm? Is our thesis fresh/current? How can we better support portfolio companies? What do we want to be when we grow up?

If forced to summarize one key take-away from these discussions, it would be to continue to chart our own path. Study and learn from other great investors and firms, but do things our way.

Some of the highlights:

A wonderful session with Mark Suster. Mark is someone I’ve looked up to for a long time. A principled, hard-working, generous person. He leads by example and lets his performance speak for itself. His willingness to open up and speak candidly with our entire team about a wide range of topics was such a gift. He’s got an absolute treasure chest of knowledge.

IMG_3993.jpeg

Next up was a donut break! We couldn’t help but meet up with (Read more...)

Ranked: The Best Countries to Retire In


This post is by Raul Amoros from Visual Capitalist


best countries to retire in 2022

Ranked: The Best Countries to Retire in Around the World

Our global population is getting older. By 2050, the OECD predicts that 30% of people worldwide will be aged 65 or over.

While some countries are relatively prepared to handle this increase in the elderly demographic, others are already feeling the squeeze and struggling with the challenges that come with a rapidly aging population.

Which countries are the best equipped to support their senior citizens? This graphic uses data from the 2022 Natixis Global Retirement Index to show the best countries to retire in around the world, based on several different factors that we’ll dig into below.

What Makes a Country Retirement-Friendly?

When people consider what makes a place an ideal retirement location, it’s natural to think about white sand beaches, hot climates, and endless sunny days. And, in truth, the right net worth opens up a world of opportunity of where to enjoy one’s golden years.

The Global Retirement Index (GRI) examines retirement from different, more quantitative perspective. The annual report looks at 44 different countries and ranks them based on their retirement security. The index considers 18 factors, which are grouped into four overarching categories:

  • Health: Health spend per capita, life expectancy, and non-insured health spend.
  • Quality of Life: Happiness levels, water and sanitation, air quality, other environmental factors, and biodiversity/habitat.
  • Material Wellbeing: Income per capita, income equality, and employment levels.
  • Finances in Retirement: Government debt, old-age dependency, interest rates, inflation, governance, tax pressure, and bank non-performing (Read more...)