For the upgrade


This post is by Seth Godin from Seth's Blog


The phone in your pocket cost $600, but that was two years ago, so now, it seems to be free and fully paid for.

The upgrade has a slightly better camera and a slightly faster processor.

Here’s the question: “If you could have chosen between the phone you have now and the phone you want now two years ago, would you have paid $700 more for the newer one?”

Most people would not.

So why do we upgrade? Software, phones, cars, houses…

It’s because we’re not making that simple choice. Instead, we’re embracing the wisdom of the choice we made years ago at the same time we’re focusing on the glaring defects that status and affiliation relentlessly point out.

They’re not trying to sell you a phone any longer. Or a house. They’re spending all their time selling you an upgrade.

For the upgrade


This post is by Seth Godin from Seth's Blog


The phone in your pocket cost $600, but that was two years ago, so now, it seems to be free and fully paid for.

The upgrade has a slightly better camera and a slightly faster processor.

Here’s the question: “If you could have chosen between the phone you have now and the phone you want now two years ago, would you have paid $700 more for the newer one?”

Most people would not.

So why do we upgrade? Software, phones, cars, houses…

It’s because we’re not making that simple choice. Instead, we’re embracing the wisdom of the choice we made years ago at the same time we’re focusing on the glaring defects that status and affiliation relentlessly point out.

They’re not trying to sell you a phone any longer. Or a house. They’re spending all their time selling you an upgrade.