Day: September 28, 2022

Green Steel: Decarbonising with Hydrogen-Fueled Production


This post is by Omri Wallach from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by AFRY
This infographic highlights industrial emissions and hydrogen's role in green steel production.

Green Steel: Decarbonising with Hydrogen-Fueled Production

As the fight against climate change ramps up worldwide, the need for industries and economies to respond is immediate.

Of course, different sectors contribute different amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and face different paths to decarbonisation as a result. One massive player? Steel and iron manufacturing, where energy-related emissions account for roughly 6.1% of global emissions.

The following infographic by AFRY highlights the need for steel manufacturing to evolve and decarbonise, and how hydrogen can play a vital role in the “green” steel revolution.

The Modern Steel Production Landscape

Globally, crude steel production totalled 1,951 million tonnes (Mt) in 2021.

This production is spread all over the world, including India, Japan, and the U.S., with the vast majority (1,033 million tonnes) concentrated in China.

But despite being produced in many different places globally, only two main methods of steel production have been honed and utilised over time—electric arc furnace (EAF) and blast furnace basic oxygen furnace (BF-BOF) production.

Both methods traditionally use fossil fuels, and in 2019 contributed 3.6 Gt of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions:

Steel Production MethodMaterials UtilisedCO2 Emissions (2019)
EAFScrap0.5 Gt
BF-BOFScrap, iron ore, coke3.1 Gt

That’s why one of the main ways the steel industry can decarbonise is (Read more...)

Green Steel: Decarbonising with Hydrogen-Fueled Production


This post is by Omri Wallach from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by AFRY
This infographic highlights industrial emissions and hydrogen's role in green steel production.

Green Steel: Decarbonising with Hydrogen-Fueled Production

As the fight against climate change ramps up worldwide, the need for industries and economies to respond is immediate.

Of course, different sectors contribute different amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and face different paths to decarbonisation as a result. One massive player? Steel and iron manufacturing, where energy-related emissions account for roughly 6.1% of global emissions.

The following infographic by AFRY highlights the need for steel manufacturing to evolve and decarbonise, and how hydrogen can play a vital role in the “green” steel revolution.

The Modern Steel Production Landscape

Globally, crude steel production totalled 1,951 million tonnes (Mt) in 2021.

This production is spread all over the world, including India, Japan, and the U.S., with the vast majority (1,033 million tonnes) concentrated in China.

But despite being produced in many different places globally, only two main methods of steel production have been honed and utilised over time—electric arc furnace (EAF) and blast furnace basic oxygen furnace (BF-BOF) production.

Both methods traditionally use fossil fuels, and in 2019 contributed 3.6 Gt of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions:

Steel Production MethodMaterials UtilisedCO2 Emissions (2019)
EAFScrap0.5 Gt
BF-BOFScrap, iron ore, coke3.1 Gt

That’s why one of the main ways the steel industry can decarbonise is (Read more...)

Five Questions for Charles Best


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


Charles Best is founder of DonorsChoose, a nonprofit that lets individuals donate directly to public school classrooms.

Its impact has been astounding:

— 86% of public schools in America have posted a project on DonorsChoose.

— Almost 5.5 million individual donors have contributed.

— It’s given over $1.3 billion to support requests from teachers (from over 87,000 schools).

I recently asked Charlies five questions.

What aren’t people talking about enough?

Tests that are worth teaching to. Standardized tests don’t have to suck the life out of a subject. We can build assessments that capture critical thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, empathy, and other core attributes–and those assessments could be the basis for both accountability and true learning.

What’s a piece of commonly accepted advice you think is wrong?

“Launch as soon as you have a minimally viable product so you can start iterating based on customer feedback” isn’t wrong, but I think there’s one big exception to Eric Ries’ Lean Startup ethos, and that is brand naming. When I came up with the name “DonorsChoose,” I chose poorly. The name doesn’t imply anything about schools, teachers, or educational equity, and most importantly, the syllables in “DonorsChoose” do not easily roll off the tongue or stick to the brain. But early on, we had some great media stories referring to us by that name. If Oprah has just done a segment saying that “DonorsChoose is a revolutionary charity,” how could we ever touch the name?

The window of opportunity to change a (Read more...)

Six Questions for Charles Best


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


Charles Best is founder of DonorsChoose, a nonprofit that lets individuals donate directly to public school classrooms.

Its impact has been astounding:

— 86% of public schools in America have posted a project on DonorsChoose.

— Almost 5.5 million individual donors have contributed.

— It’s given over $1.3 billion to support requests from teachers (from over 87,000 schools).

I recently asked Charlies six questions.

What aren’t people talking about enough?

Tests that are worth teaching to. Standardized tests don’t have to suck the life out of a subject. We can build assessments that capture critical thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, empathy, and other core attributes–and those assessments could be the basis for both accountability and true learning.

What’s a piece of commonly accepted advice you think is wrong?

“Launch as soon as you have a minimally viable product so you can start iterating based on customer feedback” isn’t wrong, but I think there’s one big exception to Eric Ries’ Lean Startup ethos, and that is brand naming. When I came up with the name “DonorsChoose,” I chose poorly. The name doesn’t imply anything about schools, teachers, or educational equity, and most importantly, the syllables in “DonorsChoose” do not easily roll off the tongue or stick to the brain. But early on, we had some great media stories referring to us by that name. If Oprah has just done a segment saying that “DonorsChoose is a revolutionary charity,” how could we ever touch the name?

The window of opportunity to change a (Read more...)

Academic hiring



This is Joseph.

Just the public part of this Substack post by Ilya Shapiro is amazing. Like how disconnected do you need to be from academic hiring to make this complaint:


The idea that the diversity piece might have been what sank his application ignores his CV. Honorary fellow at the University of Mississippi and adjunct teacher at George Washington University Law School from 2005 to 2007. Now he has published books ad done a lot of think tank work so it might not be silly to have had his name in the pool. But he was approached by a faculty member on on the search committee and had limited academic experience. That lack of institutional academic experience was far more likely than the diversity statement of the competing candidates to have been decisive. 

That said, that he was never given a rejection letter is just rude. Sadly, not sending rejection letters is common in academia but also clearly something that we should do a lot better about. 

That said, we are not talking about a person who has been driven into destitution by these decisions. For example, the Georgetown position he declined ended up getting him a national speaking tour about free speech, so I'd say he ended up doing ok. Even if it is a bit too easy to point out the contradiction between "I have been silenced" and "I am on a national speaking tour":


I mean it is fine for Ilya to complain about how (Read more...)

Logistics vs (and) innovation


This post is by Seth Godin from Seth's Blog


When innovation arrives, the logistics people have to scramble to keep up, because innovation always makes it hard to do things the way we used to.

Over time, an innovative company thrives if it can get its logistics in order. Ship the right stuff to the right people on time and on budget.

Once this happens, it often means that the logistics people gain in power and influence. After all, they pulled off a miracle.

Then, when the next innovation shows up, the logistics voices in the room are likely to have more say in what happens next. That’s why upstarts who feel like they have nothing to lose are so much more likely to innovate–they don’t realize how hard it is going to be.

Innovation doesn’t work without logistics.