Day: September 22, 2022

The sorry state of the web


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Christian Heilmann is an astute observer of the web and its evolution, so I pay attention. I have followed his blog for many years. I found myself nodding my head when reading this piece. The whole piece is worth a read. (link below).

The web we have these days is in a sorry state. On the one hand we have the “social web” firmly in the hand of marketeers, bots and political propaganda. On top of that drowning in memes, reposts and funny things you already read in newsgroups in 1998. On the other hand we have the publisher web after 25 years still not being able to embrace the concept that you can’t control the distribution of your content once it is online. On the social web, knowledge is smothered by agenda and on the publisher web by ads and paywalls and contracts. Ever tried to look up some news from 12 years ago? Back in library days you were able to do that. On news portals, most articles are deleted after a year, and on newspaper web sites you hardly ever get access to the archives – even with a subscription

Read article on Christian Heilmann

What do sensors know?


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


person driving car during night time
Photo by Gabe Pierce on Unsplash

China’s new rule: if your car uses sensors to map the environment, you must apply for government permit (link). Car sensors are now so good and ubiquitous they’re viewed as security threats. ‘The statement is a clarification of China‘s surveying and mapping law and reflects regulators’ efforts to prevent highly-detailed visual data collected by smart cars falling into the hands of hostile foreign actors.’ Related: A new sign shows that Tesla cars cannot enter government agencies and state-owned enterprises in China (Trucks VC)

Chinese decisions on car sensors are a testimonial that, as a nation, they genuinely know the capabilities of sensors and connected sensors as data and intelligence sources! As the saying goes, it takes a thief to know another

Did you notice: That we have not heard a peep from Elon Musk about why Chinese regulators haven’t approved  Tesla’s FSD for use on local roads? That man is always yapping about US politicians, loudly and crassly — because, you know, democracy and shit! 

September 22, 2022. San Francisco

A dummy’s guide to killing a golden goose 


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Facebook doesn’t understand why it is losing to TikTok and keeps copying them, but it is not working. And in doing so, it has changed Instagram so much that even the most loyal users are giving up. 

Essentially, it comes down to a major shift in user behaviors, away from following your friends, and seeing all the random stuff that they post, to following trends, and engaging with the most popular, most engaging content from across the platform, as opposed to walling off your own little space.

Read article on Social Media Today

Five years ago at the blog — No special relevance here. I just like talking about this stuff.



Friday, September 29, 2017

Thoughts on a Ouija board


As previously (and frequently) mentioned, I've been chipping away at a couple of essays about 21st century attitudes toward technology. The incredible spike in innovation of the late 19th and early 20th centuries plays a big role. Unfortunately, the more I dig in, the more I find new aspects to the subject.

I came across yet another when watching this Bob Chipman movie review of Ouija[Now apparently off line -- MP]. My general rule for movie reviews and criticism (Chipman falls more in the latter but is also pretty good at the former) is to only check out writing on movies that I either have seen, or care so little about that they can't really be spoiled. This one fell in the second category.

Chipman is exceptionally good with historical and cultural context. He started this review with a brief historical overview of the popular board game, suggesting that the filmmakers could have gotten a more interesting and original film had they mined the actual history of the Ouija board rather than opting for something standard and derivative. What caught my ear was the fact that the Ouija board was first marketed in 1891 as an attempt to cash in on the spiritualism craze of the era.

Here's Linda Rodriguez McRobbie writing for the Smithsonian:

As spiritualism had grown in American culture, so too did frustration with how long it took to get any meaningful message out of the (Read more...)

Investor Stories 262: Strange & Unusual (Zulkosky, Fernandez, O’Malley)



On this special segment of The Full Ratchet, the following Investors are featured:

  • Sara Zulkosky
  • Hernán Fernandez
  • Brian O'Malley

Each investor describes the most unusual situation or pitch that they've encountered as an investor.

The host of The Full Ratchet is Nick Moran, General Partner of New Stack Ventures, a venture capital firm committed to investing in founders outside of the Bay Area. Learn more about New Stack Ventures by visiting our Website. Also, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter! Founders, are you frustrated by trying to find the ideal VC's for your stage, sector, and geography? Answer five questions with VC Rank and generate your customized list now.