Day: August 24, 2022

Uranium – The Fuel for Clean Energy


This post is by Bruno Venditti from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Skyharbour Resources
Skyharbour-Uranium-the-Fuel-for-Clean-Energy

Uranium – The Fuel for Clean Energy

Global demand for electricity is set to grow around 50% by 2040.

As the only energy source of low-carbon, scalable, reliable, and affordable electricity, nuclear is set to play a prominent role in meeting this growing demand while satisfying decarbonization objectives globally.

In this infographic from Skyharbour Resources, we take a closer look at how uranium is shaping the future of energy.

Nuclear Power to Backstop Clean Energy Transition

Nuclear is considered an important source of clean energy, being the second largest source of low-carbon electricity in the world behind hydropower.

Nuclear power plants produce no greenhouse gas emissions during operation, and over the course of their life cycle, they produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions per unit of electricity as wind, and one-third of the emissions per unit of electricity when compared with solar.

Nuclear fuel is extremely dense and generates minimal waste. All of the used nuclear fuel produced by the U.S. over the last 60 years could fit on a football field at a depth of fewer than 10 yards.

To power up reactors, uranium demand is expected to rise ∼160% over the next decades.

Several countries are going nuclear in a bid to reduce reliance on fossil fuels while building reliable energy grids. Not many, however, have uranium (Read more...)

Apple’s Golden Noose


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


One of the first & best lessons you get as a young business reporter: follow the money. I have never forgotten that. It is a handy lens – you can zoom in or out when trying to understand something. (1)

Using that approach, I looked at Apple’s recent moves. Especially around advertising. One can get lost in the outrage over Apple’s push to advertising — the Internet’s first original sin, but the question is why? (2)

From privacy (theater) to tussle with Facebook nee Meta to risking antagonizing its current customer base, if you zoom out, you start to see a reason behind Apple’s moves. (3)

The same reason has pushed Apple’s foray into payments, credit cards, and buy no later pay offerings. By following the money, it is easy to see that Apple has a golden noose around its neck. (4)

In my debut piece for The Spectator World, the US edition of the world’s oldest magazine, I explain Apple’s dilemma and why it has to do what it is doing. (Registration Required.)

August 24, 2022. San Francisco

Big Beliefs


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


A trick to learning a complicated topic is realizing how many complex details are a cousin of something simple. John Reed writes in his book Succeeding:

When you first start to study a field, it seems like you have to memorize a zillion things. You don’t. What you need is to identify the core principles – generally three to twelve of them – that govern the field. The million things you thought you had to memorize are simply various combinations of the core principles.

Most fields are a hierarchy of truths with big ideas at the top and laws, rules, and finer details branching off below them. Viewing ideas in isolation, without recognizing the family tree of where they came from, gives a distorted view of how a field works and can overcomplicate what are often simple answers.

Beliefs are the same. How many business and investing beliefs do I have – opinions, ideas, models, etc? I don’t know, thousands probably. It’s a complex topic. But most of them derive from a few core beliefs.

A few big things I believe:

The inability to forecast the past has no impact on our desire to forecast the future. Certainty is so valuable that we’ll never give up the quest for it, and most people couldn’t get out of bed in the morning if they were honest about how uncertain the future is.

No one’s success is proven until they’ve survived a calamity. Serendipity often masquerades as skill, and (Read more...)

Big Beliefs



A trick to learning a complicated topic is realizing how many complex details are a cousin of something simple. John Reed writes in his book Succeeding:

When you first start to study a field, it seems like you have to memorize a zillion things. You don’t. What you need is to identify the core principles – generally three to twelve of them – that govern the field. The million things you thought you had to memorize are simply various combinations of the core principles.

Most fields are a hierarchy of truths with big ideas at the top and laws, rules, and finer details branching off below them. Viewing ideas in isolation, without recognizing the family free of where they came from, gives a distorted view of how a field works and can overcomplicate what are often simple answers.

Beliefs are the same. How many business and investing beliefs do I have – opinions, ideas, models, etc? I don’t know, thousands probably. It’s a complex topic. But most of them derive from a few core beliefs.

A few big things I believe:

The inability to forecast the past has no impact on our desire to forecast the future. Certainty is so valuable that we’ll never give up the quest for it, and most people couldn’t get out of bed in the morning if they were honest about how uncertain the future is.

No one’s success is proven until they’ve survived a calamity. Serendipity often masquerades as skill, and (Read more...)

Ranked: America’s Best States to Do Business In


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


Ranked: The best states to do business in

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Ranked: America’s Best States to Do Business In

The United States often ranks as one of the best countries to start a business in, but the ease with which one can do business varies state by state. There are many considerations that factor into starting a business like the available workforce, the condition of local infrastructure, access to investors, a culture that’s open to business, and so on.

This map ranks America’s best states to do business in based on a study from CNBC which measured 88 factors across 10 broad categories.

Methodology

Here is a further breakdown of the weight given to each of the 10 categories:

states to do business in

The Most Business Friendly States

North Carolina—coming in first place in the ranking—attracts an extremely talented and innovative workforce, largely thanks to the state’s investment in its Research Triangle Regional Partnership (RTRP).

Overall RankState
#1North Carolina
#2Washington
#3Virginia
#4Colorado
#5Texas
#6Tennessee
#7Nebraska
#8Utah
#9Minnesota
#10Georgia
#11Florida
#12Iowa
#13North Dakota
#14Indiana
#15 (Read more...)

Thomvest Turns 25: Reflections on the Road Less Traveled in Venture



Our Origins
This year marks the 25th anniversary of our firm’s first significant venture investment. As we reflect on our twenty-five years of investing, our journey in the VC industry has been unique: we are one of the few family-owned venture firms to have grown to an institutional scale while remaining backed by the same founding individual. Our firm has leveraged the cultural grounding of our Canadian origins while becoming a top-performing investor in Silicon Valley.

The genesis of Thomvest can be traced back to when our Founder, Peter Thomson, started to learn programming with one of the first IBM PCs produced in 1981. Peter taught himself BASIC using the manuals with his PC and later learned Pascal. Peter realized the impact technology would have on both consumers and businesses and shifted his attention from an interest in programming to an interest in investing in technology startups.

Our First Investment
Certicom was our first significant startup investment twenty-five years ago. Certicom pioneered encryption technology for use in cell phones, and following Peter’s investment, the company grew and was listed on the NASDAQ before being acquired by Blackberry. That experience set him on the path toward venture investing as a calling. Peter brought on board one of our founding colleagues, Bill Dodds, to begin investing not only in Canada but also in Silicon Valley.

Our work in our early days in the Valley was reminiscent of what we see with the entrepreneurs we work with daily — a focus on grit and scrappiness while building (Read more...)

Venture Deals Fall 2022


This post is by Brad Feld from Brad Feld


Registration for the Venture Deals Fall 2022 course is open.

The course is free and starts on September 20, 2022. This is the second time we are running the new version of the course (v2!) that was co-created with Techstars and Kauffman Fellows.

If interested, sign up now. I hope to see you there in one of the AMAs we will host for anyone who takes the course.

The post Venture Deals Fall 2022 appeared first on Brad Feld.

Park City Life is Very Nice And The World’s Steepest Bike Ride


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


I am with Gary and Tom and Don is Park City this week catching up in person as a team for the first time in a couple months and it has been fun.  Gary and Tom have family homes here. Our newest partner Matt is moving in to his new home in San Diego this week (moved cross country from New York) so he could not make the trip.

Summer in Park City is really nice.  So much open space, great temperature and clean air.

Yesterday, Tom organized an afternoon of riding down trails on Deer Valley mountain.  Very different to road biking.  I might be too old for this but really enjoyed the trails and downhill speed.  I took all the padding and gear that they offered which was smart because I had one good spill.

Our friend Brent took us out on his boat on Jordanelle Reservoir which was a great way to end the day. I grew up with lake life on Muskoka and will be up there for a few days next month.

I left my phone in the car all day as well which made for a more relaxing day.

Today a round of golf with friends at Victory Ranch.

PS – Jono sent me this video of  ‘The Wold’s Steepest Ride‘ which I really enjoyed.  It is only 10 minutes.  If you are a cyclist you will appreciate the crazy difficulty and the amazing bike Pinarello built to withstand the pressure.