Day: August 17, 2022

Angel Investment: Trove Health


This post is by Jo Tango from jtangoVC.com


We’re happy to announce that our family angel program (back 80+ entrepreneurs over eight years and donate all gains to charity; details here) has invested in Trove Health. It is our 25th investment so far (portfolio here). The company is not saying much about what it is doing, but I can include the following from

The post Angel Investment: Trove Health appeared first on jtangoVC.com.

Explained: The Relationship Between Climate Change and Wildfires


This post is by Mark Belan from Visual Capitalist


The relationship between climate change and wildfires explained

Can I share this graphic?
Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.
When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.
Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

How Climate Change is Influencing Wildfires

Each year, thousands of wildfires burn through millions of acres of land around the world.

We’ve already seen the mass devastation that wildfires can bring, especially in places like Australia, Serbia, and California. But new research by the UN indicates that things might get even worse by the end of the century. By 2100, the frequency of wildfires could increase by up to 50%.

What’s causing this influx of wildfires around the world? Below, we dig into how climate change is impacting wildfires—and how in turn, wildfires are impacting climate change.

Climate Conditions That Support Wildfires

Before diving in, it’s worth going over the basics of wildfires, and how they get started in the first place. An area’s vulnerability to wildfires, also known as its fire regime, depends on three major conditions: its atmosphere, vegetation, and ignitions.

① Atmosphere

Atmosphere plays a big part in how sensitive an area is to wildfires. For instance, wind can increase oxygen supply in an area, which would help fuel a wildfire, (Read more...)

How to Break the Cycle of Technology Panics



This is an excerpt from Build for Tomorrow by Jason Feifer (Harmony Books, September 2022). Amy Orben wanted to answer a very modern question: How do digital connections compare with other forms of connection?  It’s the kind of thing only a wonky, hyperanalytic person would think to ask. Orben is that person. She received a... Read More

The post How to Break the Cycle of Technology Panics appeared first on Future.

How to Break the Cycle of Technology Panics



This is an excerpt from Build for Tomorrow by Jason Feifer (Harmony Books, September 2022). Amy Orben wanted to answer a very modern question: How do digital connections compare with other forms of connection?  It’s the kind of thing only a wonky, hyperanalytic person would think to ask. Orben is that person. She received a... Read More

The post How to Break the Cycle of Technology Panics appeared first on Future.

Battle At The 200-Day Moving Average


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


The markets are throwing it all at the ‘youts’ in 2022.

This has been the first and a very nasty bear market for them.

They heard the word ‘capitulation’ for a few months and it never came.

All summer they heard about inflation and maybe even looked up the term ‘CPI’.

The last few days and onward they will hear endlessly about the 200-day moving average. If you don’t know what that means or what everyone is talking about, click here.

I have been talking about the 200 day for a few months because all the major US indices have traded well below them. I get cautious when we cut below that moving average. Investors and traders have long treated it as a major trend line for stocks.

Yesterday, the S&P continued it’s climb from the June lows and touched the 200-day moving averages so of course we are all talking about it.

I have no idea what happens next, but the ‘experts’ doubt it will be easy to break this downward trend in the index.

The chart that caught my attention yesterday was this one which of course because it brings back memories of 2008. Have a look:

I am not doing anything differently today, but I am not ignoring the price action that happens as we bang around, up or down this moving average over the next few days, weeks or months.

Are the Republicans more vulnerable to the internal veto problem than the Democrats?



This is a follow-up to Monday's repost "The GOP needs the crazies more than the crazies need the GOP. " The whole piece is relevant, but in terms of this discussion, here's the money shot.

 Probably since 2008 and certainly since 2012, pretty much every nontrivial faction of the GOP has held veto power which means the question is no longer who has it, but who is willing to use it. The Tea Party was the first to realize this. Now the alt-right has caught on to the dynamic as well.
Andrew Gelman wasn't convinced:

I see your point, but given that the 2 parties have approximately equal support (OK, maybe the D's have 51% and the R's 49%, but it varies from election to election and they're both close to 50%), doesn't your argument apply to the Democrats as well? Indeed, wouldn't it apply to both parties most of the time for the past few decades? I agree there's something new in recent years with the crazies and the Republican party, but I can't see how it could be simple math. 

Let's see if I can shore up my claim.

                                            Sometimes 50 x 100% > 100 x 50%. Sometimes it's not.

Though I'm tempted to push back a little bit more, we can let the equal support stand for the sake of argument, but what exactly (Read more...)

More than your share


This post is by Seth Godin from Seth's Blog


The math is simple: many people do less than they should.

They might be selfish, but it’s likely that they’re struggling with a lack of resources or a story of insufficiency. Either way, in any community or organization, many people contribute less than their peers.

Whether it’s splitting a check, getting a project done or making an impact on the culture or a cause, if you want things to get better, the only way is to be prepared to do more than your fair share.

Because we need to make up for the folks who don’t.