Day: July 27, 2022

Visualized: The Top 25 U.S. Newspapers by Daily Circulation


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


u.s. newspapers print circulation in 2021

Visualized: The Top 25 U.S. Newspapers by Daily Circulation

Most people today—more than 8 in 10 Americans—get their news via digital devices, doing their reading on apps, listening to podcasts, or scrolling through social media feeds.

It’s no surprise then that over the last year, only one U.S. newspaper of the top 25 most popular in the country saw positive growth in their daily print circulations.

Based on data from Press Gazette, this visual stacks up the amount of daily newspapers different U.S. publications dole out and how that’s changed year-over-year.

Extra, Extra – Read All About It

The most widely circulated physical newspaper is the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) by a long shot—sending out almost 700,000 copies a day. But it is important to note that this number is an 11% decrease since 2021.

Here’s a closer look at the data.

RankNewspaperAverage Daily Print CirculationYear-Over-Year Change
#1Wall Street Journal697,493−11%
#2New York Times329,781−9%
#3USA Today159,233−13%
#4Washington Post159,040−12%
#5New York Post146,649−2%
#6Los Angeles Times142,382−14%
#7Chicago Tribune106,156−16%
#8Star Tribune103,808−9%
#9Tampa Bay Times102,266−26%
#10Newsday97,182−12%
#11Seattle Times86,406−10%
#12Honolulu Star-Advertiser79,096−5%
#13Arizona Republic70,216−10%
#14Boston Globe68,806−11%
#15Dallas Morning News65,369−10%
#16Houston Chronicle65,084−17%
#17Philadelphia Inquirer61,180−20%
#18San Francisco Chronicle60,098−12%
#19Denver (Read more...)

Comparing Gun Laws and Gun-Related Deaths Across America


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Ranking of each U.S. state's gun law, from strictest to loosest

Comparing Gun Laws and Gun-Related Deaths Across America

In June 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to strike down concealed-gun legislation in New York sent shock waves through the country.

The decision brought renowned attention to the ongoing debate around America’s gun laws—one that Americans have grossly differing views on. This lack of consensus is apparent not just in public opinion, but in legislation, with U.S. firearm regulation varying greatly from state to state.

Which states have the strictest (and loosest) gun regulations around? This graphic by Elbie Bentley sets the ground for comparing gun laws across America before the impact of the Supreme Court’s ruling can be fully understood. It uses 2021 data from Giffords Law Center and contrasts against gun-related deaths in each state.

States With The Strictest Gun Laws

Since 2010, researchers at Giffords Law Center have been ranking state gun laws across America and seeing if there’s a correlation between stricter gun laws and lower gun-related deaths.

Here’s a look at the top 10 states with the strictest gun laws and their number of gun-related deaths in 2021:

RankStateGun-Related Deaths in 2021 (per 100,000 people)% Difference from National Average
1California8.5-37%
2New Jersey5-63%
3Connecticut6-56%
4Hawaii3.4-75%
5Massachusetts3.7-73%
6New York5.3-61%
7Mayland13.5-1%
8Illinois14.1+3%
9Rhode Island5.1-62%
10Washington10.9-20%

California has the strictest gun laws in the country. Some of (Read more...)

A Zomato 2022 Update: Value, Pricing and the Gap



On July 21, 2021, I valued Zomato just ahead of its initial public offering at about 41 per share. The market clearly had a very different view, as the stock premiered at 74  per share and soared into the stratosphere, peaking at 169 per share in late 2021. The last few months have been rocky, as the price has been marked down, partly in response to disappointing results from the company, and partly because of macro developments. At close of trading on July 26, 2022, the stock was trading at 41.65 per share, and the mood and momentum that worked in its favor for most of 2021 had turned against the company. In this post, I will begin with a quick review of my 2021 valuation, then move on to the price action in 2021 and 2022 and then update my valuation to reflect the company's current numbers. 

My IPO Valuation

I valued Zomato, soon after it filed its prospectus for its initial public offering, in July 2021. The details of that valuation are in this post, but to cut a long story short, I argued that an investment on Zomato was a joint bet on India (that economic growth would bring more discretionary income to its people), on Indian eating habits (that Indians would eat out at restaurants more than they have in the past) and on the company (that its business model and first move advantages would give it a dominant market share (Read more...)

How Much Land does the U.S. Military Control in Each State?


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


Mapping u.s. military land in states

How Much Land does the U.S. Military Own in Each State?

The United States spends an unparalleled amount of money on its military⁠—about $778 billion each year to be precise.

Additionally, the U.S. military also owns, leases, or operates an impressive real estate portfolio with buildings valued at $749 billion and a land area of 26.9 million acres⁠, of which around 98% is located within the United States.

This visual, using data from the Department of Defense (DoD) reveals how much of each state the U.S. military owns, leases, or operates on.

This map visualizes the share of a state comprised by military sites, which the Department of Defense defines as a specific geographic location that has individual land parcels or facilities assigned to it. The geographical location is leased to, owned by, or otherwise under the jurisdiction of the DoD.

What is Military Land Used For?

The DoD is the larger government umbrella under which the military falls and the department operates on over 26 million acres of land stateside.

To further break it down the U.S. military is divided into four main branches:

  • Army
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Marine Corps

There is also the Space Force, the Coast Guard, and the National Guard. However, most of the land is dedicated to the Army, which is the military’s largest branch.

Military bases are used for training and housing soldiers, testing weapons and equipment, conducting research, and running active operations, among other things. A large majority of the square footage (Read more...)

How Much Land does the U.S. Military Control in Each State?


This post is by Avery Koop from Visual Capitalist


Mapping u.s. military land in states

How Much Land does the U.S. Military Own in Each State?

The United States spends an unparalleled amount of money on its military⁠—about $778 billion each year to be precise.

Additionally, the U.S. military also owns, leases, or operates an impressive real estate portfolio with buildings valued at $749 billion and a land area of 26.9 million acres⁠, of which around 98% is located within the United States.

This visual, using data from the Department of Defense (DoD) reveals how much of each state the U.S. military owns, leases, or operates on.

This map visualizes the share of a state comprised by military sites, which the Department of Defense defines as a specific geographic location that has individual land parcels or facilities assigned to it. The geographical location is leased to, owned by, or otherwise under the jurisdiction of the DoD.

What is Military Land Used For?

The DoD is the larger government umbrella under which the military falls and the department operates on over 26 million acres of land stateside.

To further break it down the U.S. military is divided into four main branches:

  • Army
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Marine Corps

There is also the Space Force, the Coast Guard, and the National Guard. However, most of the land is dedicated to the Army, which is the military’s largest branch.

Military bases are used for training and housing soldiers, testing weapons and equipment, conducting research, and running active operations, among other things. A large majority of the square footage (Read more...)

Breaking Down A Tesla


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


Tesla has single-handedly transformed the landscape of the automobile industry worldwide in less than two decades. Before it, almost no car companies were seriously invested in developing all-electric vehicles (EVs).

Now, automakers around the world are racing to catch up to Tesla, completely overhauling their R&D to prioritize EVs.

And we think Tesla and the cars it makes are good.

Yes, it’s had its fair share of controversy and drama over the years, from accusations of sexual harrasment at the company to CEO Elon Musk’s infamously mercurial behavior on Twitter (and his efforts both to outright buy it and then get out of buying it). Tesla was also recently de-listed from the S&P 500 Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) index, which struck many people as odd for a company whose raison d’être is to eliminate fossil fuel emissions.

Setting aside all that recent news to look at Tesla’s cars themselves, the Models S, 3, X, and Y are truly groundbreaking in the EV space because they were the first cars to do everything that a gas-powered car can do without asking drivers to sacrifice style and luxury. And people have been lining up in droves to buy them. So, despite the controversies, the company seems to be doing an admirable job of hewing to its mission to “accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

We’ve recently gotten really interested in the materials that make up our world, and so we started to wonder: what are Tesla’s cars actually (Read more...)

Breaking Down A Tesla



Tesla has single-handedly transformed the landscape of the automobile industry worldwide in less than two decades. Before it, almost no car companies were seriously invested in developing all-electric vehicles (EVs).

Now, automakers around the world are racing to catch up to Tesla, completely overhauling their R&D to prioritize EVs.

And we think Tesla and the cars it makes are good.

Yes, it’s had its fair share of controversy and drama over the years, from accusations of sexual harrasment at the company to CEO Elon Musk’s infamously mercurial behavior on Twitter (and his efforts both to outright buy it and then get out of buying it). Tesla was also recently de-listed from the S&P 500 Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) index, which struck many people as odd for a company whose raison d’être is to eliminate fossil fuel emissions.

Setting aside all that recent news to look at Tesla’s cars themselves, the Models S, 3, X, and Y are truly groundbreaking in the EV space because they were the first cars to do everything that a gas-powered car can do without asking drivers to sacrifice style and luxury. And people have been lining up in droves to buy them. So, despite the controversies, the company seems to be doing an admirable job of hewing to its mission to “accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

We’ve recently gotten really interested in the materials that make up our world, and so we started to wonder: what are Tesla’s cars actually (Read more...)

How the Merge Will Impact Future Ethereum Upgrades



Ethereum’s biggest-ever upgrade — the move to a proof-of-stake consensus mechanism — is right around the corner. But while the Merge should add security and sustainability, it doesn’t include sharding, the long-anticipated method of scaling the network.  In Part I of our conversation with Ethereum Foundation (EF) researcher Danny Ryan, who’s helped coordinate the upgrade... Read More

The post How the Merge Will Impact Future Ethereum Upgrades appeared first on Future.

What the Merge Means for Ethereum, With Danny Ryan



After years of research, development and testing, Ethereum will transition from proof of work to proof of stake in the coming months. Instead of “miners” using computational energy to process transactions, “validators” will lock up, or stake, their assets in the network in return for ETH rewards. The upshot is increased security and a much... Read More

The post What the Merge Means for Ethereum, With Danny Ryan appeared first on Future.

Two-Sided Networks, a Founder’s Playbook



The most significant bottleneck in the adoption of healthcare technology to date has been distribution. Over the last decade, generations of digital health companies have struggled to reach escape velocity—not because their products and services weren’t transformative, but because …

The post Two-Sided Networks, a Founder’s Playbook appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.