Day: July 22, 2022

Timeline: The Domestication of Animals


This post is by Omri Wallach from Visual Capitalist


Timeline of the domestication of animals

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Timeline: The Domestication of Animals

While dogs weren’t always our docile companions, research indicates that they were likely one of the first animals to be domesticated by humans. In fact, genetic evidence suggests that dogs split from their wild wolf ancestors around 33,000 years ago.

When did humans domesticate other animals, and why? This timeline highlights the domestication period of 15 different animals, based on archeological findings.

Because exact timing is tricky to pinpoint and research on the topic is ongoing, these estimates may vary by thousands of years.

Defining Domestic

The domestication of animals is a particular process that’s done through selective breeding. Generally speaking, domestic animals follow most of these criteria:

  1. Genetically distinct from their wild ancestors and more human-friendly as a genetic trait.
  2. Dependent on humans for food and reproduction.
  3. They’re extremely difficult or impossible to breed with wild counterparts.
  4. Show the physical traits of domestication syndrome, such as smaller skulls, floppy ears, or coat color variations.

Domestication is not the same as taming an animal, which is when humans condition (Read more...)

Team Profile: Megan Baker, IT and Security Lead


This post is by Georgian Team from Georgian


What are you responsible for at Georgian?

As the IT and Security Lead, I’m focused on three main areas. The first is building relationships with the chief information security officers (CISOs) across our portfolio and identifying opportunities where we can help them. In some cases that involves coaching and advising, while in others it means partnering together on deeper engagements. 

I’m also responsible for internal security at Georgian, including for products like Georgian Grow, our product that uses a customer’s (portfolio companies) historical data to predict which contacts are most likely to convert so that their sales teams can spend time where it matters most. Beyond that, I also evaluate any cybersecurity companies in our investment pipeline and make recommendations to our investment team based on my findings.

What were you doing prior to joining Georgian?

I spent the last five years in a variety of IT and information security roles at PrecisionLender, a Georgian Fund III company, and subsequently at Q2 after it was acquired. Prior to that I spent a decade at First Citizens Bank, the largest family-owned bank in the United States, where I was instrumental in building out its enterprise risk management program. Having worked for PrecisionLender, I knew Georgian. So when the opportunity presented itself in February, I was excited to join the team. 

Why is cybersecurity a priority for Georgian?

Trust is one of our investment thesis areas, which means that things like privacy and security aren’t just top of mind, but (Read more...)

A Lifetime’s Consumption of Fossil Fuels, Visualized


This post is by Niccolo Conte from Visual Capitalist


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A Lifetime’s Consumption of Fossil Fuels, Visualized

Visualizing the Fossil Fuels we Consume in a Lifetime

This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on natural resource megatrends in your email every week.

From burning natural gas to heat our homes to the petroleum-based materials found in everyday products like pharmaceuticals and plastics, we all consume fossil fuels in one form or another.

In 2021, the world consumed nearly 490 exajoules of fossil fuels, an unfathomable figure of epic proportions.

To put fossil fuel consumption into perspective on a more individual basis, this graphic visualizes the average person’s fossil fuel use over a lifetime of 80 years using data from the National Mining Association and Worldometer.

How Many Fossil Fuels a Person Consumes Every Year

On a day-to-day basis, our fossil fuel consumption might seem minimal, however, in just a year the average American consumes more than 23 barrels of petroleum products like gasoline, propane, or jet fuel.

The cube of the average individual’s yearly petroleum product consumption reaches around 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall. When you consider varying transportation choices and lifestyles, from public transit to private jets, the yearly cube of petroleum product consumption for some people may easily overtake their height.

annual fossil fuel consumption

To calculate the volume needed to visualize the petroleum products and coal cubes (natural gas figures were already in volume format), we used the densities of bulk bituminous coal (833kg/m3 (Read more...)

Mark Vanhoenacker’s new book


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


One of the great pleasures of being active on Twitter, I have been able to connect and converse with folks I immensely admire. Nitin Sawhney, for example. I have often enjoyed my exchanges with Mark Vanhoenacker, a professional pilot and a writer who wrote the best-selling book, Skyfaring. I loved (and devoured) that book, and I wistfully reread it during the lockdown. 

(From the archives: My review of Skyfaring.)

He brings travel alive with the verve of a poet. I have been patiently waiting for his new book, Imagine a city: a journey across the urban world. As the name suggests, it is his paean to some of his favorite cities. Not surprisingly, it is getting good reviews. “Combines the god’s eye view… with street-by-street detail. The book will enchant and even move anyone who feared in recent years for the future of both travel and urbanism,” writes Financial Times. 

Mark sent me a copy, and I am currently reading the book and hope to have a chat with Mark (and share it with readers) soon. So far, the book is everything and more than I expected. FT is right — it is a perfect summer book.

Have a great weekend, everyone. 

July 22, 2022. San Francisco 

Speculation as Entertainment – Bear Market Edition


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


Happy Friday.

Back in October of last year as the market was already ‘tipped’ but the party still going, I wrote a post titled ‘Speculation Is Entertainment Is The New Netflix And Chill‘.

The gist…

With $11 trillion printed since COVID, we should not be surprised that speculation is a new form of entertainment.

Young people collecting NFT’s with fractional ownership and DAO’s, while spending their weekends talking and trading crypto is ok with me.

Before you know it they will know how to invest and that’s a good thing seeing there is a portion of that $11 trillion that will need to be invested and speculated on well to pay for all the wasted trillions.

In Rome, all the free time led to Gladiators, so take it easy on the ‘youts’ please.

Here we are in late July 2022 and it has been one of the worst years for technology growth stocks and I have noticed that ‘Speculation as Entertainment’ is alive and well.

I was golfing with my sons friends a few weeks back and the guys were on some random sports wagering site betting Jai alai. They had never seen the sport live. It was NOON. It was just part of their workflow because of the smartphone, apps and legalized gambling. I enjoyed chatting with them about the whole thing while having a good laugh.

On Stocktwits, I have noticed the $SQQQ ticker and stream trending often the last few months. This is the three (Read more...)

Speculation as Entertainment – Bear Market Edition


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


Happy Friday.

Back in October of last year as the market was already ‘tipped’ but the party still going, I wrote a post titled ‘Speculation Is Entertainment Is The New Netflix And Chill‘.

The gist…

With $11 trillion printed since COVID, we should not be surprised that speculation is a new form of entertainment.

Young people collecting NFT’s with fractional ownership and DAO’s, while spending their weekends talking and trading crypto is ok with me.

Before you know it they will know how to invest and that’s a good thing seeing there is a portion of that $11 trillion that will need to be invested and speculated on well to pay for all the wasted trillions.

In Rome, all the free time led to Gladiators, so take it easy on the ‘youts’ please.

Here we are in late July 2022 and it has been one of the worst years for technology growth stocks and I have noticed that ‘Speculation as Entertainment’ is alive and well.

I was golfing with my sons friends a few weeks back and the guys were on some random sports wagering site betting Jai alai. They had never seen the sport live. It was NOON. It was just part of their workflow because of the smartphone, apps and legalized gambling. I enjoyed chatting with them about the whole thing while having a good laugh.

On Stocktwits, I have noticed the $SQQQ ticker and stream trending often the last few months. This is the three (Read more...)

Am I an idiot?



This is Joseph.

Mark had a polite comment on one of the positions that I held:
Conventional pundit wisdom was that Trump's statements about defending Social Security and Medicare had inoculated the GOP against that line of attack. Pundits can be idiots

While I hope I avoid the full "idiot" level, I thought it was worth reflecting why my analysis was wrong. After all, numbers like this need to be explained if you think that people just assume social security and Medicare are safe from Republican meddling:

 

That is a 15 point drop on the generic ballot in two months among the 65+ crowd. 

I think it is important that we be accountable when we are wrong. So what did I miss?

Pondering it for a while, I think I overlooked the real impact of the Supreme Court, in general, and Dobbs, in particular. The quest to overturn Roe versus Wade goes back to the 1980's and Ronald Reagan. But after 50 years this could be dismissed as posturing, after all the ruling had survived two generations of judges who were heavily Republican appointed. But then, one day, it happened.

This seems to me to have had two immediate implications.

  1. Older voters do not like radical change and all of the sudden the Supreme Court was delivering a series of radical rulings, Thermostatic politics kicked in, as well as the general distrust of radical change among those with less time to adapt to it
  2. Suddenly these threats (Read more...)