Day: July 20, 2022

5 Things to Know About Europe’s Scorching Heatwave


This post is by Nick Routley from Visual Capitalist


5 Things to Know About Europe’s Scorching Heatwave

5 Things to Know About Europe’s Scorching Heatwave

For the last few months, Europe’s smoldering heatwave has been wreaking havoc across the region, causing destructive wildfires, severe droughts, and thousands of deaths.

The EU’s record-breaking temperatures are making headlines around the world, as experts worry these extreme heatwaves could be the region’s new normal.

Given the volume of coverage on the topic, we sifted through dozens of articles and Twitter threads (so you don’t have to) and complied a list of the five major things to know about Europe’s smothering heatwave.

① High Temperatures are Shattering Records

Temperatures have been hitting all-time highs across the region.

On Monday, July 18, dozens of towns across France reported record-breaking temperatures of up to 42°C (107.6°F). In the same week, the U.K. experienced its hottest day on record at 40.3°C (104.5°F), breaking Britain’s previous record of (38.7°C) 101.7°F that was set back in 2019.

The heat in London was so unprecedented, the city’s national rail service issued a warning to the public, urging passengers to stay home and only travel if necessary. Some major rail lines were even closed for parts of the day on Tuesday, July 19.

② Europe is Feeling the Burn

The smoldering heat is fueling disastrous wildfires across the continent. As of July 20, an estimated 1,977 wildfires have blazed across the region in 2022—almost 3x the average amount, according to historical data from the European Forest Fire Information System.

Mediterranean countries have been hit particularly hard, (Read more...)

The likable brand (or person)


This post is by Seth Godin from Seth's Blog


Likability is a weird quality. Plenty of people are fans of Aretha Franklin or Bob Dylan, but it’s not because either of them spent a lot of time mailing out Christmas cards or being particularly warm to their fans.

Google doesn’t do tech support and plenty of popular high-end restaurants got that way by being difficult to book and not particularly welcoming to new patrons.

One reason is that we’re drawn to status. To like something as a way of certifying our insight or rank.

But there’s a different path, one that’s far easier to maintain and travel. It’s simple: Like your customers and they’re more likely to like you back.

This is one reason that the Beatles switched their focus after their first US tour (and eventually stopped touring). They couldn’t figure out how to like the screaming young fans that didn’t have much in the way of discernment. Instead, they shifted to writing and producing music for fans and colleagues that they wanted to spend their time liking.

If you want to be more liked, begin by liking.

Little Ways The World Works


This post is by Collab Fund from Collab Fund


If you find something that is true in more than one field, you’ve probably uncovered something particularly important. The more fields it shows up in, the more likely it is to be a fundamental and recurring driver of how the world works.

Take two topics that seemingly have nothing to do with each other: goldfish and tech companies.

Take two groups of identical baby fish. Put one in abnormally cold water; the other in abnormally warm water. The fish living in cold water will grow slower than normal, while those in warm water will grow faster than normal.

Put both groups back in regular temperature water and they’ll eventually converge to become normal, full-sized adults.

Then the magic happens.

Fish with slowed-down growth in their early days go on to live 30% longer than average. Those with artificial super-charged growth early on die 15% earlier than average.

That’s what biologists from University of Glasgow found.

The cause isn’t complicated. Super-charged growth can cause permanent tissue damage and “may only be achieved by diversion of resources away from maintenance and repair of damaged biomolecules.” Slowed-down growth does the opposite, “allowing an increased allocation to maintenance and repair.”

“You might well expect a machine built in haste to fail quicker than one put together carefully and methodically, and our study suggests that this may be true for bodies too,” one of the researchers wrote.

The same thing has been found in humans. And in birds. And in rats.

And (Read more...)

Little Ways The World Works



If you find something that is true in more than one field, you’ve probably uncovered something particularly important. The more fields it shows up in, the more likely it is to be a fundamental and recurring driver of how the world works.

Take two topics that seemingly have nothing to do with each other: goldfish and tech companies.

Take two groups of identical baby fish. Put one in abnormally cold water; the other in abnormally warm water. The fish living in cold water will grow slower than normal, while those in warm water will grow faster than normal.

Put both groups back in regular temperature water and they’ll eventually converge to become normal, full-sized adults.

Then the magic happens.

Fish with slowed-down growth in their early days go on to live 30% longer than average. Those with artificial super-charged growth early on die 15% earlier than average.

That’s what biologists from University of Glasgow found.

The cause isn’t complicated. Super-charged growth can cause permanent tissue damage and “may only be achieved by diversion of resources away from maintenance and repair of damaged biomolecules.” Slowed-down growth does the opposite, “allowing an increased allocation to maintenance and repair.”

“You might well expect a machine built in haste to fail quicker than one put together carefully and methodically, and our study suggests that this may be true for bodies too,” one of the researchers wrote.

The same thing has been found in humans. And in birds. And in rats.

And (Read more...)

Blitzscaling Creativity with DALL-E


This post is by Reid Hoffman from Reid Hoffman


  • DALL-E amplifies human creativity and increases the impact and value of visual professionals across a huge range of industries.
  • From Leonardo Da Vinci to Andy Warhol, great artists have always utilized apprentices and assistants to help fulfill their creative visions. DALL-E is a highly accessible AI assistant that makes it easy for everyone to tap their inner Leonardos. 
  • Visual expression can’t exist without technology. Great artists have always been great  innovators. If groundbreaking artists like Da Vinci, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keefe, and Frida Kahlo were alive today, I’m sure they’d be experimenting with DALL-E.

From the very first cave painting, image-creation has had an exponential impact on humanity’s capacity to communicate knowledge; express feelings, values, and aspirations; and work collaboratively. That’s why we say a picture is worth a thousand words. 

But image creation can also be slow work. Leonardo Da Vinci filled thousands of notebook pages with his sketches, drawings, and writings, but fewer than 20 surviving paintings are, in the words of the Encyclopedia Britannica, “definitively attributed to him.” 

What if he’d had an AI-enabled computer to assist him? What if millions of other people had access to this same tool?

“Press the button – we do the rest,” an early Kodak ad exclaimed. By 1900, the Kodak Brownie could be had for $1, a roll of film with six exposures cost a dime, and photography had shifted from a narrow domain of skilled professionals to a much broader one of amateurs spontaneously documenting the world as (Read more...)

Visualizing the Negative Impact of the Shaving Industry


This post is by Aran Ali from Visual Capitalist


The following content is sponsored by Henson Shaving
Graphic that breaks down the negative impact of the mainstream shaving industry

Visualizing the Negative Impact of the Shaving Industry

The art of shaving has a history rich with transformation that dates back to ancient civilizations. That is until the 20th century when mainstream plastic cartridge razors began to flood the market.

This graphic from Henson Shaving shows how mainstream plastic cartridge razors conflict with expectations of the modern world by being huge contributors to pollution.

The data also suggests that consumers could significantly benefit from switching over to using a safety razor. Let’s dive in.

Rethinking Shaving

The shaving industry is dominated by several corporate entities that rake in billions of dollars every year. In fact, the majority of razors on the market today are optimized for profit rather than sustainability and affordability.

The industry was worth $17 billion in 2021 and is poised to grow by 17%, reaching $20 billion by 2030. Within this large market, the U.S. is a key player. The country imports over half a billion razors a year—more than any other country. Overall, U.S. shavers go through 2 billion razors a year, which is roughly 12 per consumer on average.

How much waste does this create?

As it turns out, quite a lot. The 2 billion razors discarded annually cover an area of 700 acres—assuming the average disposable cartridge razor (without a handle) has a dimension of (Read more...)

Visualizing Gender Diversity in Corporate America


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


There’s been a massive push to increase diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

However, it appears corporate America still has a ways to go, particularly when it comes to diverse representation in corporate leadership roles. In 2021, only 8.2% of Fortune 500 CEOs were female. Of those females, 85% of them were white.

This graphic by Zainab Ayodimeji highlights the current state of diversity in corporate America, reminding us that there are still significant gender and racial gaps.

Graphic showing the breakdown of female CEOs on the Fortune 500 since 1970

Five Decades of Fortune 500 CEOs

Since 1955, Fortune Magazine has released its annual Fortune 500 list that ranks the 500 largest U.S. companies, ranked by total revenue earned each fiscal year.

For the first 17 years of its publication, there were no female CEOs on the Fortune 500. Then in 1972, Katharine Graham became CEO of the Washington Post, making her the first-ever female CEO of a Fortune 500 company.

Following Graham, a few other women joined the ranks, such as Marion Sandler, co-CEO of Golden West Financial Corporation, and Linda Wachner, CEO of Warnaco Group. But apart from those few outliers, Fortune 500 CEOs remained almost exclusively male for the next few decades.

At the turn of the millennium, things started to change. Women-led companies started to appear more frequently on the Fortune 500. Here’s a breakdown that shows the number of women CEOs on the list, from 1999 to 2021:

YearFortune 500 # of Women CEOs% of Total
199920.4%
200020.4%
(Read more...)

The Weight Of Creativity


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Leica M11 with 35 & 50mm Summicron and 135 Telmar lenses.

Photography, or rather landscape photography, strums my heartstrings like none other. A trip undertaken to indulge in one’s passion in life is often a reason for one’s soul to smile. And then why do I find myself cringing at the idea of such adventures? 

The answer is relatively simple – I’m not too fond of the gear. To be more specific, I hate the weight of the gear. Is it such an unreasonable reaction? Or is it?

Perhaps, I have become accustomed to the idea of my devices — iPhone, iPad, and MacBooks — becoming more powerful and adding features. And at the same time, finding ways to trim their weight.

The sight of a backpack filled with gear – camera bodies, lenses, and other paraphilia fills me with dread. My two camera bodies — my original Leica SL and Leica SL-2s, along with three lenses — the Leica Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-90mm f/2.8-4 ASPH (2.5 lbs), the Leica APO-Vario-Elmarit-SL 90-280mm f/2.8-4 Lens (4 lbs) and the Leica APO-Summicron-SL 50mm f/2 ASPH (1.67 lbs), some filters, four extra batteries, and a charger, plus a few other do-hickeys, add up to just over 20 pounds on my back. And this doesn’t include the weight of the laptop and the bag itself. A landscape photo adventure means carrying at least 30 pounds on your back. And I am not one of those who camp in the wild. Otherwise, the total weight on (Read more...)

Did Netflix Bottom?


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


It has been a beast of a bear market for most technology growth stocks …at least the stocks I follow and own or have owned.

Today, Netflix was up $15 after hours after being up $10 during. They reported earnings and continue to lose subscribers so it is not like the business is in growth mode.

I have attached below a Netflix 20 year chart and Netflix 1 year chart…

Is last year a blip, the beginning of the end, or the start of a new bull market?

Yet people wonder why investing is so addictive and THE language to learn

Disclosure – Long Netflix $NFLX