Day: July 18, 2022

Instagram is dead


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Photo by Jazmin Quaynor/Unsplash

Okay, I didn’t mean to be so dramatic. Or use a clickbait headline, but in reality, what used to be Instagram is now dead. It was a wonderful gathering place for photographers to showcase their work and build an audience. Not a day goes by when some photographer friend or the other bemoans how Instagram is no longer a place for photography. 

They willfully ignore what Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, said almost a year ago:

“We’re no longer a photo-sharing app or a square photo-sharing app.” Instagram’s chief went on to elaborate that “at Instagram, we’re always trying to build new features that help you get the most out of your experience. Right now, we’re focusing on four key areas: Creators, Video, Shopping, and Messaging.” In other words, anything but photography. 

***

“While Instagram initially fueled my passion for photography; rather than being inspired through the art of photography itself, too often I find myself chasing numbers of followers and likes. I realized that all this time I wanted to share my work to get a ‘pat on the back,’ rather than to inspire,” photographer Nicole Malina told PetaPixel. They are addicted to this notion of an audience that gives them credence, and this addiction allows the photographers to keep feeding the monster that doesn’t care — all it wants is to sell sell sell.

(Additional ReadingPetaPixel did an excellent job of curating photographers and their thoughts about Instagram, and it is (Read more...)

Visualized: Battery Vs. Hydrogen Fuel Cell


This post is by Marcus Lu from Visual Capitalist


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Battery Electric Vs. Hydrogen Fuel Cell

This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on natural resource megatrends in your email every week.

Since the introduction of the Nissan Leaf (2010) and Tesla Model S (2012), battery-powered electric vehicles (BEVs) have become the primary focus of the automotive industry.

This structural shift is moving at an incredible rate—in China, 3 million BEVs were sold in 2021, up from 1 million the previous year. Meanwhile, in the U.S., the number of models available for sale is expected to double by 2024.

In order to meet global climate targets, however, the International Energy Agency claims that the auto industry will require 30 times more minerals per year. Many fear that this could put a strain on supply.

“The data shows a looming mismatch between the world’s strengthened climate ambitions and the availability of critical minerals.”
– Fatih Birol, IEA

Thankfully, BEVs are not the only solution for decarbonizing transportation. In this infographic, we explain how the fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) works.

How Does Hydrogen Fuel Cell Work?

FCEVs are a type of electric vehicle that produces no emissions (aside from the environmental cost of production). The main difference is that BEVs contain a large battery to store electricity, while FCEVs create their own electricity by using a hydrogen fuel cell.

Major BEV ComponentsMajor FCEV Components
BatteryBattery
Onboard chargerHydrogen fuel tank
Electric motorFuel cell stack
Electric motor
Exhaust

Let’s go over the functions of the major FCEV components.

Battery

First is the lithium-ion battery, which stores electricity to power the electric motor. In an FCEV, the battery is smaller because it’s not the primary power source. For general context, the Model S Plaid contains 7,920 lithium-ion cells, while the Toyota Mirai FCEV contains 330.

Hydrogen Fuel Tank

FCEVs have a fuel tank that stores hydrogen in its gas form. Liquid hydrogen can’t be used because it requires cryogenic temperatures (−150°C or −238°F). Hydrogen gas, along with oxygen, are the two inputs for the hydrogen fuel cell.

Fuel Cell Stack and Motor

The fuel cell uses hydrogen gas to generate electricity. To explain the process in layman’s terms, hydrogen gas passes through the cell and is split into protons (H+) and electrons (e-).

Protons pass through the electrolyte, which is a liquid or gel material. Electrons are unable to pass through the electrolyte, so they take an external path instead. This creates an electrical current to power the motor.

Exhaust

At the end of the fuel cell’s process, the electrons and protons meet together and combine with oxygen. This causes a chemical reaction that produces water (H2O), which is then emitted out of the exhaust pipe.

Which Technology is Winning?

As you can see from the table below, most automakers have shifted their focus towards BEVs. Notably missing from the BEV group is Toyota, the world’s largest automaker.

FCEVs struggling to build momentum

Hydrogen fuel cells have drawn criticism from notable figures in the industry, including Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess.

Green hydrogen is needed for steel, chemical, aero,… and should not end up in cars. Far too expensive, inefficient, slow and difficult to rollout and transport.
– Herbert Diess, CEO, Volkswagen Group

Toyota and Hyundai are on the opposing side, as both companies continue to invest in fuel cell development. The difference between them, however, is that Hyundai (and sister brand Kia) has still released several BEVs.

This is a surprising blunder for Toyota, which pioneered hybrid vehicles like the Prius. It’s reasonable to think that after this success, BEVs would be a natural next step. As Wired reports, Toyota placed all of its chips on hydrogen development, ignoring the fact that most of the industry was moving a different way. Realizing its mistake, and needing to buy time, the company has resorted to lobbying against the adoption of EVs.

Confronted with a losing hand, Toyota is doing what most large corporations do when they find themselves playing the wrong game—it’s fighting to change the game.
– Wired

Toyota is expected to release its first BEV, the bZ4X crossover, for the 2023 model year—over a decade since Tesla launched the Model S.

Challenges to Fuel Cell Adoption

Several challenges are standing in the way of widespread FCEV adoption.

One is performance, though the difference is minor. In terms of maximum range, the best FCEV (Toyota Mirai) was EPA-rated for 402 miles, while the best BEV (Lucid Air) received 505 miles.

Two greater issues are 1) hydrogen’s efficiency problem, and 2) a very limited number of refueling stations. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, there are just 48 hydrogen stations across the entire country. 47 are located in California, and 1 is located in Hawaii.

On the contrary, BEVs have 49,210 charging stations nationwide, and can also be charged at home. This number is sure to grow, as the Biden administration has allocated $5 billion for states to expand their charging networks.

The post Visualized: Battery Vs. Hydrogen Fuel Cell appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

Broken Fences


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


It was a perfect storm – high winds, blowing snow, and bone-chilling cold. Or, as I like to call it — a perfect time for magic. It helps that I have a camera that helps me do it with minimum fuss. Both images were captured at an aperture of f8, ISO 100, and a shutter speed of 1/640th of a second. I used my f2/50 mm M-APO Summicron lens on a Leica SL2 body. The top image is a jpeg right out of the camera. I use a slightly tweaked version of the B&W High contrast film style built into the camera. The second photo is an edited version of the DNG file.

When to Expand Your Marketplace Business, According to 14 Operators



Most of the world’s leading consumer marketplaces looked like completely different businesses at their inception. Amazon was famously an online bookseller, while Uber started as a black car service. DoorDash launched as “Palo Alto Delivery” (reflecting its narrow geographic range), while Booking.com exclusively helped travelers find hotels in the Netherlands.  This type of focused launch... Read More

The post When to Expand Your Marketplace Business, According to 14 Operators appeared first on Future.

The Brilliance of Bloomberg’s Matt Levine


This post is by Brad Feld from Brad Feld


Of all the business and technology writers out there, including bloggers, I think the best one, at this moment, is Matt Levine. He’s the only person currently writing on Planet Earth that I find myself reading every word of everything he writes.

For the last few months, he has been mostly writing about three topics:

  • The Twitter Elon Musk Soap Opera
  • Why (and How) Much of Crypto Is A Plain, Old, Ponzi Scheme
  • Other Crazy and Fucked Up Things in Finance

For a flavor of his writing, read the following 11 chapters of Matt’s writing (listed in chronological order). Then, subscribe to his newsletter and get a magnificent medium-form article in your inbox every other day or so.

Momentum Monday – Will The US Dollar Wreck Earnings Season?


This post is by Howard Lindzon from Howard Lindzon


Another summer Monday morning…

I am keeping my schedule light this week.

As always though, Ivanhoff and I sat down to discuss the momentum in the markets. It remains choppy and one best suited for swing traders not trend followers.

You can watch/listen to this weeks episode right here. I have also embedded the YouTube video below on the blog:

Here are Ivanhoff’s thoughts…

The stock market had all the reasons to sell off last week and it didn’t. Many stocks managed to hold and even rally after record and accelerating inflation data. It feels wrong to be bullish while the Fed is still tightening but it is double-wrong not to take long setups when they appear. And we saw some relatively constructive price action towards the end of last week. Some names stood out: SWAV, LNTH, CELH, CCRN, OPCH, LRN, VERU, etc. Keep in mind that none of those has reported earnings yet. One earnings report can end their enthusiasm overnight. This is exactly what happened with the stocks that were showing relative strength during the previous earnings window. You don’t need to hold them over earnings. There’s nothing wrong with taking advantage of short-term opportunities, even if they only last a couple of days.

Biotech has held the best during the more recent market volatility. XBI tested its 10-day EMA a couple of times and it bounced. The dips are getting bought in the sector. I continue to see constructive price action – HRMY, HALO, NTLA, SGEN, (Read more...)