Day: July 6, 2022

Lifestyles



Fifty-four years ago this month, in a push for publicity, The Sunday Times offered £5,000 to whoever could sail solo nonstop around the world the fastest. It was technically a race, but that was an afterthought, as no one had ever completed the feat.

There were no qualification requirements and few rules. Nine men joined the race, one of whom had never sailed. Just one man finished, 312 days and 27,000 miles later.

But it was two participants who never completed the race that generated the most news. One ended up dead, the other found himself happier than ever. Both outcomes came from decisions made at sea, but neither had anything to do with sailing.

The two men, Donald Crowhurst and Bernard Moitessier, are astounding examples of how the quality of your life is shaped by who you want to impress. Their stories are extreme, but what they dealt with was just a magnified version of what ordinary people face all the time, and likely one you’re facing right now.


Donald Crowhurst was a tinkerer who came up with his own boat modifications. Convinced his innovations could propel him to win the Sunday Times race, he faced just one obstacle: he was broke, and stood no chance of financing the race himself.

Crowhurst struck a deal with an English businessman who agreed to cover the cost of the race under two conditions: They would orchestrate a media frenzy, portraying Crowhurst as a sailing savant. And if Crowhurst didn’t finish, he (Read more...)

Exploring The Consumer Potential of Plant-Based Alternatives



10 things investors should know about the plant-based food market Part 1 of 6
Why the 2020s are a watershed decade for plant-based alternatives Part 2 of 6
Plant-based meat vs. animal meat Part 3 of 6
 From bean to burger 4 of 6
Plant-based consumer potential 5 of 6
5 innovations in plant-based technology 6 of 6

The following content is sponsored by The Very Good Food Company

Exploring The Consumer Potential of Plant-Based Alternatives

Plant-based alternatives have exploded in recent years, and by 2030 the total market value is predicted to surpass a whopping $161 billion. The steady growth of this market goes hand-in-hand with another trend: consumers are increasingly being spoilt for choice.

Alternatives products are expanding and evolving in order to offer the same variety as the conventional meat market. Innovative technologies are helping new plant-based products rival animal products in look, taste, texture, and even nutrition.

This infographic from the Very Good Food Company (VGFC) provides a detailed look at the range of plant-based alternatives that could take the market’s consumer potential to the next level.

The Universe of Plant-Based Alternatives

There are four major categories for plant-based meat: natural meat mimickers, functional meat substitutes, meatless meat, and vegetable-forward products. How do they stack up?

Natural meat mimickersProvide meatless products with a savory mouthfeel, and are naturally high in fiber /proteinExamples: Legumes e.g. beans peas, lentils, pressed vegetables, mushrooms, jackfruit
Functional meat substitutesMay not taste exactly like meat, but have similar textures and flavorsExamples: Textured vegetable protein e.g. soya chunks, Unprocessed binders e.g. zucchini, carrot, coconut, beans, tofu, tempeh, seitan
Meatless meatReplicates meat’s typical characteristics, sometimes by combining natural meat mimickers and functional meat substitutesExamples: Impossible Burger,
Beyond Burger

These products appeal to "flexitarian" consumers, but can be highly processed
Vegetable-forwardDoesn’t try to replicate meat exactly, (Read more...)

Five Links for July


This post is by auren from Summation by Auren Hoffman


Every month I try to share the most mind-expanding links to read/watch/listen. If you find these interesting, please do share with your friends. Here are five links worth reading… The Current ThingWhy is everyone up in arms about something new every month? Due to mimetic desire, social psychology, and social media, the mainstream converges to […]

The post Five Links for July appeared first on Summation by Auren Hoffman.

Five Links for July


This post is by auren from Summation by Auren Hoffman


Every month I try to share the most mind-expanding links to read/watch/listen. If you find these interesting, please do share with your friends. Here are five links worth reading… The Current ThingWhy is everyone up in arms about something new every month? Due to mimetic desire, social psychology, and social media, the mainstream converges to […]

The post Five Links for July appeared first on Summation by Auren Hoffman.

Startup Markets, Summer 2022 Edition


This post is by Elad Gil from Elad Blog


About a month ago, I wrote a tweet storm on the changing startup financing and employment environment. This blog captures aspects of that tweet storm and some of its predictions and extends them further. Like all predictions this is what I view as a highly likely scenario versus the only potential future path for the next 3-18 months or so.

The high level view is that things have yet to get truly bad in private tech.  2021-2022 were an anomaly due to COVID policies which both created an incredibly cheap low interest money environment, pumped the stock market, and facilitated adoption of certain types of tech. This environment led to both excess in fundraising but also in hiring. This means that as money transitions back to to "normal" levels teams that were hired too far ahead need to shrink. Many areas (hiring plans, valuations, time venture capital raised lasts, etc) are roughly reseting to 2018/2019 norms, which themselves were all time highs prior to the COVID era.

If interest rates and money supply continue to tighten and a recession happens, then things should get worse. The below largely deals with the base case of things roughly stay where they are now. More likely, things will get worse before they get better. Nonetheless, it is still a great time to start a company.

So what do the next few quarters look like?

1. Financings

Valuations will continue to drop and are not stable yet

Private markets tend to lag adjustments in (Read more...)

Your network is bigger than you think


This post is by Reid Hoffman from Reid Hoffman


Your network is bigger than you think

Interconnectedness feels good emotionally, but professionally it is limiting because the same information recycles through your local network of like-minded friends. If a close friend or ally knows about a job opportunity, you probably already do too. That’s why the breadth and reach of your network is valuable.

When thinking about how to expand your connections, remember the times you’ve met someone and discovered you know people in common. The clerk at the local hardware store once hiked through Yosemite with your brother-in-law. Your new girlfriend went to grad school with your boss’s wife. A new client’s kid goes to the same school as yours. “It’s a small world,” we say after such realizations.

But is the world actually that small?

In 1967, Psychologist Stanley Milgram and his student Jeffrey Travers conducted a famous study in which they asked a couple hundred people in Nebraska to mail a letter to someone they knew personally who might in turn know a target stockbroker in Massachusetts. On average, it took six different stops before it showed up at the stockbroker’s home or office in Massachusetts. It’s this study that birthed the six degrees of separation theory, the idea that every human being on the planet is connected to every other via no more than about six intermediary acquaintances. Subsequent studies in the digital age have borne out Milgram’s finding, also landing on the figure of six degrees.

The practical implications for the startup of you are significant. Suppose you want to become (Read more...)

When optimal is suboptimal



Whenever a metric maxes out it creates problems. Back in my teaching days, I used to try in vain to explain to colleagues and particularly to administrators that a test where anyone, let alone numerous students, made 100% was a bad test. A "perfect" score meant you didn't actually know how well that student did. Did they just barely make that hundred or could they have aced a much more difficult test? 

Worse yet, if more than one student make 100%, we have no way of ranking them. When we start calculating final grades and averaging these tests, we invariably give the same amount of credit to two students who had substantially different levels of mastery.

This was especially problematic given the push at one big suburban district (not coincidentally my worst teaching experience) to define an A at 93 and above rather than grading on some kind of a curve. Since there was little standardization on the writing of the tests for the most part and arguably even less in the grading of any even slightly open-ended questions, the set cut-off made absolutely no sense. Trying to tweak the difficulty level of the test so that the students doing A level work fell within that eight-point range was nearly impossible and pretty much required writing exams where the top of the class was likely to max out the instrument.

This Mitchell and Webb radio sketch looks at the same underlying question from a different angle and while I would (Read more...)