Day: July 4, 2022

Missing Migrants: Visualizing Lost Lives Along the Mediterranean Sea


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Map of missing migrants along the Eastern Mediterranean from 2014-2021

Missing Migrants: Lost Lives Along the Mediterranean Sea

Each year, thousands of migrants flee war-torn countries in search of asylum.

Even before the migrant crisis caused by the Russo-Ukrainian War, Europe has been the focal point in the past decade. Many refugees from conflicts in Africa and Asia, including those from Syria, Afghanistan, and Iraq, and have traveled to Europe along the Eastern Mediterranean migration route—a dangerous passage across the Aegean Sea that weaves along the coastlines of Greece and Turkey.

The journey to reach Europe is risky, and some of the migrants who attempt the crossing never make it. Using data from the International Organization for Migration (IOM), this map by Elbie Bentley visualizes the reported deaths and disappearances along the Eastern Mediterranean from 2014 to 2021.

Inspired by Levi Westerveld’s Those Who Did Not Cross, each lost life is captured with its own dot, in an effort to humanize the data.

The 2015 European Crisis

1,863 deaths and disappearances were reported along the Eastern Mediterranean between the years of 2014 and 2021.

Almost half of those recordings came from 2015 during the European migrant crisis, when a record-breaking one million people sought asylum in the EU.

About 800,000 of the one million migrants traveled to Greece through Turkey, with many of the refugees escaping Syria’s civil war.

European Migrant Crisis by YearReported deaths and disappearances
2014101
2015804
2016434
201762
2018174
201971
2020106
2021111

(Read more...)

Charted: Four Decades of U.S. Inflation


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Four Decades of U.S. Inflation

Charted: Four Decades of U.S. Inflation

In May 2022, the annual rate of U.S. inflation grew to 8.6%—the highest it’s been in four decades, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What’s driving this surge, and what products are seeing the most significant price jumps?

This visualization by Pablo Alvarez shows U.S. inflation levels since 1982 and highlights a few product categories that have seen the biggest year-over-year increases.

The Category Breakdown

Perhaps unsurprisingly, energy sources have seen the biggest year-over-year climb. Gasoline has seen one of the biggest spikes, up 48.7% since May 2021.

Item% yearly change (May 2022)
Gasoline (all types)48.7%
Energy34.6%
Natural Gas30.2%
Electricity12.0%
Food10.1%
All items8.6%
Apparel5.0%

Across the U.S., the average price of gas sat at $4.807 per gallon as of July 4, and experts predict this figure could grow to $6 per gallon by the end of the summer.

While fuel prices were on the upswing prior to the Russia-Ukraine conflict, due to loosening COVID-19 restrictions and increased demand for travel, the conflict sent oil prices skyrocketing. This is because many countries placed sanctions on Russian oil, which put a squeeze on global supply.

Food has also seen a massive cost spike, up 10.1% since May 2021. This is largely due to supply-chain issues, increased transportation costs, and fertilizer shortages.

The Spending Spree Continues

Despite rising prices, many consumers have been continuing to spend. In May 2022, personal consumption expenditures (which account for (Read more...)

Littered with Trash…



Nationally there are 2,632 landfills and 72 incinerators which handle much of the 250 million tons of trash produced in the United States each year. It is estimated that each of us generate nearly 4.4 pounds of garbage every day. Globally, the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development calculates that 2.6 trillion pounds of trash are produced annually. In light of this most pressing problem, last week’s Supreme Court decision to sharply curtail the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to oversee power plants was particularly troublesome.

Obviously, the wellbeing of a given population is impacted by numerous factors. Most directly, the advances in therapeutics and medical technologies can have profound and almost immediate impacts. Improvements in general living conditions, including environmental, have a significant and perhaps less obvious influence on overall health. The promise of digital health innovation to inform, engage, activate users can also be quite dramatic, although may be limited when damaging environmental conditions persist. It is the confluence of all of these advances, supported by thoughtful responsive regulatory frameworks, that will lead to improved outcomes for all. Unfortunately, poor environmental conditions can overwhelm all of the other beneficial activities to improve health.

The EPA has been responsible for the implementation of the Clean Air Act for fifty years. This act to regulate fixed sources of air pollution reflected an emerging belief that public health was directly and profoundly impacted by environmental conditions, and that the infrastructure to manage issues such as waste was often sited in near (Read more...)

Happy 4th of July: Think Independently!



Every 4th of July I like to reflect on what it means to be independent. Today I wrote nearly an entire post on production independence, starting with energy independence. But I have decided to post that another day because there is a different type of independence that I have decided is more important at this particular moment in time: independent thinking.

It has never been easy to be an independent thinker but it has become considerably more difficult in our always online, always connected world. There are several reasons for this. First, we are surrounded by suggestion algorithms that drive us ever deeper into clusters. One really has to make a strong conscious effort to follow people of different views, or one will not see those views as at all. I have long argued for what I called the “Opposing View Reader” and would happily use that if it were available as a product. In the meantime, I have added people to my Twitter feed who I strongly disagree with on almost everything.

Second, whatever we post ourselves is scrutinized and deviation from what the bulk of one’s followers think takes an extra level of conviction. So often people will stay silent on a topic rather than express their opinion for fear of having to deal with an online backlash. And of course when one does post something there are also the other type of comment (mostly from non-followers) that tries to for “guilt by association” through throwing (Read more...)

When Success Is Measured In Hate, We All Lose



One thing that right and left wing media personalities have in common: they are both desperate to be hated. Attracting the hate of their ideological opposites has become a sad metric for success. If you’re not pissing someone off, you’re not doing your job. The same mentality has entered into the world of business and entrepreneurship. This ideal of hate-seeking is toxic to our culture, but effective because we are falling for the trick over and over. But who really benefits by keeping us angry all the time?

Ransomware, Cyber-Savviness, and the Public-Private Security Connection



Nitin Natarajan is the deputy director of CISA (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency), and has extensive experience in the cybersecurity space, including overseeing critical infrastructure for the U.S. National Security Council and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  In this discussion with a16z general partner Joel de la Garza (who was previously chief... Read More

The post Ransomware, Cyber-Savviness, and the Public-Private Security Connection appeared first on Future.

Ten years ago at the blog…



 

Happy 4th from 1909


"America's wealth gap -- in 1776"

The good people at Marketplace have a sharp Independence Day spin on a big ongoing story.
Jeffrey Williamson: In 1774, the top 1 percent of households got 9.3 percent of income. 
Compare that to America today, when the top 1 percent is bringing in about 20 percent of income. Nine percent, versus 20 percent. Wow. 
Williamson: Wow. 
Even when you include slaves, Williamson says America was actually the most egalitarian country in the world when it came to the difference between rich and poor. 
So what did the founding fathers have to say about that? I called up a guy who should know. 
Clay Jenkinson: Hello my dear citizens, this is Thomas Jefferson. 
Actually it's Clay Jenkinson, a historian and Jefferson impersonator. And he says the writer of the famous phrase -- "All men are created equal" -- thought a lot about income inequality. In a letter to a friend describng the 13 colonies, he wrote "The great mass of our population consists of laborers. The rich, being few and of moderate wealth..." 
Jenkinson (Quoting Jefferson): Can any condition of society be more desireable?
I realize that we shouldn't treat the writings of the Founding Fathers as sacred text but you know, they had their moments...

340. Billion $ Lessons from a Dozen Unicorns, Why Consumer VC is not Dead, How to Size a Marketplace, and What the LP Pullback means for VC Funds (Tripp Jones)



Tripp Jones of Uncork Capital joins Nate to discuss Billion $ Lessons from a Dozen Unicorns, Why Consumer VC is not Dead, How to Size a Marketplace, and What the LP Pullback means for VC Funds. In this episode we cover:

  • What Sets Apart a Unicorn Founding Team
  • The Problem Uber Poses in Labor Marketplaces and Entrepreneurship
  • Why Raising Funds May Be Difficult in the Coming Year
  • How Slowing Down Can Increase Efficiency

Missed a recent episode? Go to The Full Ratchet blog and catch up! Also, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The host of The Full Ratchet is Nick Moran, General Partner of New Stack Ventures, a venture capital firm committed to investing in founders outside of the Bay Area. Learn more about New Stack Ventures by visiting our Website. Also, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter! Founders, are you frustrated by trying to find the ideal VC's for your stage, sector, and geography? Answer five questions with VC Rank and generate your customized list now.