Van Gogh of Typewriter Art


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Wow! Now this puts emoji art to shame!

It’s like writing at school: In English class you’d write in your book and you can’t erase what you’ve written. It’s easy in Microsoft Word to be so pedantic and look at a blank screen. With typewriters, there’s more permanent to what you put on paper. Sometimes that leads to more creative outcomes because you can’t delete what you’ve put on the page. The whole process of making the art in itself, you have to think.

Drawing with a typewriter is one of the only ways of making art where you use both hands: You’re typing and you’re moving the cartridge at the same time. If you’re on location, you’re looking at what’s in front of you. I hope that if typewriters make a resurgence, it’s because it’s an analog way of creating something — be it a written piece or drawing. 

MessyNessyChic

James Cook, a 24-year-old artist from Essex (U.K.) uses typewriters to create some amazing artworks. He should be a good role model for any one of us who falls in the trap of thinking about a new tool — a new camera, a new lens, a new pen, new paper, new ink — as an excuse to procrastinate about creating. Since Cook has about 30 typewriters, I am not saying you shouldn’t be acquiring different tools. All I am saying is don’t use tools as an excuse to not create.

I enjoyed this interview with Cook, about his (Read more...)