Debt: Privilege Confers (Health) Benefits…



More than 18% of Americans at the end of 2020 were responsible for $140 billion of overdue medical debt, which is debt that has already been sent to collection agencies and, in many of those cases, is a crippling overhang to those individuals. Medical debt is the single largest source of debt that these agencies handle. “High medical debt” is defined as debt that is more than 20% of annual household income, and while only 4% of U.S. households fall into this category, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that 11.3% of households in poverty have “high medical debt.” Coupled with last month’s Journal of the American Medical Association report finding that wealth correlates directly to longevity, the minatory impact of medical debt on the overall state of U.S. healthcare must be better understood.

While doctor visits and diagnostic procedures are relatively inexpensive, their prevalence contributing to the medical debt issue is very high per a 2016 Kaiser Family Foundation study. This likely has the unfortunate downstream implication of people deferring necessary primary care and preventive procedures, leading to more expensive future health conditions. Not surprisingly, issues concerning hospitalizations were identified as the most significant expense items, and likely were least avoidable, further contributing to an aversion to engage with the healthcare system.

Perhaps not surprising, the demographics of those confronting medical debt burdens tend to skew towards groups who have uncertain paths to wealth accumulation or historically have been disenfranchised.  Another shared attribute: those with high levels of medical (Read more...)