Day: May 20, 2021

Box Office Blockbusters: The Top Grossing Movies in the Last 30 Years


This post is by Carmen Ang from Visual Capitalist


Top Grossing Movies in the Last 30 Years

The Top Grossing Movies in the Last 30 Years

People have varying opinions on what constitutes a good movie. And while it’s nearly impossible to identify a film’s intrinsic quality—at least, in an objective way—one thing that can be measured is the revenue that a movie generates.

With this in mind, here’s a look at the top grossing movies worldwide since the early 1990s, using data from Box Office Mojo. These figures include box office revenue as of May 2021, but don’t consider other revenue sources like merchandise sales.

The Full List: Top 50 Highest Grossing Movies

Coming in at number one on the list is Avatar—since its release in 2009, this Oscar-winning hit has grossed $2.84 billion in box office sales.

RankTitleLifetime GrossYear
1Avatar$2,847,246,2032009
2Avengers: Endgame$2,797,501,3282019
3Titanic$2,201,647,2641997
4Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens$2,068,455,6772015
5Avengers: Infinity War$2,048,359,7542018
6Jurassic World$1,670,516,4442015
7The Lion King$1,657,870,9862019
8The Avengers$1,518,815,5152012
9Furious 7$1,515,255,6222015
10Frozen II$1,450,026,9332019
11Avengers: Age of Ultron$1,402,809,5402015
12Black Panther$1,347,597,9732018
13Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2$1,342,321,6652011
14Star Wars: Episode VIII - The Last Jedi$1,332,698,8302017
15Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom$1,310,464,6802018
16Frozen$1,281,835,2462013
17Beauty and the Beast$1,264,434,5252017
18Incredibles 2$1,243,089,2442018
19The Fate of the Furious$1,236,005,1182017
(Read more...)

Visualizing the Copper Intensity of Renewable Energy



The following content is sponsored by Trilogy Metals.

Visualizing the Copper Intensity of Renewable Energy

The world is moving away from fossil fuels, towards large-scale adoption of clean energy technologies.

Building these technologies is a mineral-intensive process. From aluminum and chromium to rare earths and cobalt, the energy transition is creating massive demand for a range of minerals.

Copper is one such mineral, which stands out due to its critical role in building both the technologies as well as the infrastructure that allows us to harness their power.

The above infographic from Trilogy Metals highlights the role of copper in renewable energy, and how the adoption of wind and solar energy will affect its demand going forward.

Copper’s Role in Renewable Energy

Copper has one of the highest thermal and electrical conductivity of all metals. As a result, it’s the most widely-used mineral among energy technologies and is essential for all electricity-related infrastructure.

According to Navigant Research, here’s how much copper wind and solar farms use per megawatt:

TechnologyCopper Usage/MW (lbs)Copper Usage/MW (U.S. tons)Copper Usage/MW (tonnes)
Solar PV11,0005.54.99
Onshore Wind9,5204.764.32
Offshore Wind21,07610.549.56

Solar photovoltaics (PV) primarily rely on copper for cabling, wiring, and heat exchange due to its efficiency in conducting heat and electricity. Wind energy technologies make use of the red metal in their turbines, cables, and transformers. Offshore wind farms typically use larger amounts because they are connected to land via long undersea cables (Read more...)

The Pandemic A Year Later: Lessons On Predicting Venture Outcomes



This article was originally published on Forbes here.

The start of each new year brings various predictions for what the year in venture will look like. So it’s timely to ask ourselves, “How reliable are such predictions?” To answer this question, I looked at my own predictions for 2020 and how those compared to what actually happened during the balance of the year. To be fair, mine were made in early April 2020 at the beginning of the pandemic, but they still called for sizable changes in the venture landscape.

My predictions for 2020 were based on our team’s analysis of the last two tech downturns, as well as my own experience in venture investing over the last twenty years. We also factored in the newly emerging pandemic into our six predictions:

  1. 30% drop in VC investing
  2. 30% drop in Series A investments
  3. Meaningful drop in Series A valuations
  4. A “flight to quality” in private markets
  5. This downturn would make a “beeline for main street”
  6. This downturn would force a change in how enterprise sales would be done

One of our assumptions was that the venture industry had developed its own pattern of behavior, and that it would react in a way that was consistent with how it did in prior downturns. With a few notable caveats, four out of our six predictions appear to have been correct. The reaction of VC firms to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic appears to show relatively consistent behavior over cycles if we (Read more...)

Eano’s Stella Wu is not your typical construction tech startup founder



Renovating a home is an exciting, yet often fraught-filled, endeavor.

One startup that aims to help make the process simpler, cheaper and less stressful by helping people manage the home renovation process has raised $6 million to help it grow even faster. Builders VC led the round, which included participation from Celtic, Newfund and Wish co-founder Danny Zhang, who also sits on Eano’s board.

Stella Wu, who formerly worked as a growth product manager at Wish, got firsthand experience of the pain points related to the process when she bought her own house in 2017.

“I realized there were a lot of fragmented issues in the renovation space, especially when it came to the individual workers,” she recalls. “They were not reliable and bad at communication.”

So in 2019 she founded Eano, a San Francisco-based startup that aims to walk a homeowner through a renovation and help connect individual contractors with new clients. Eano also works on projects like building ADUs (accessory dwelling units).

As more people spent time at home last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the startup saw its contract revenue spike by 5x, Wu says. And in the first quarter of this year, business was up 70% year over year.

Image Credits: Eano CEO and founder Stella Wu / Eano

Eano, she said, offers competitive and transparent pricing so that homeowners aren’t surprised as a remodeling project goes on. Its automated process tracks all communications and (Read more...)

Don’t tweet about $ASS



I am not a smart man.

Earlier today I tweeted about $ASS, a cryptocurrency named after a dog. In this case, Australian Shepherds. And after doing that obviously stupid thing, my Twitter feed became chock-full of ass-related imagery, memes, and $ASS coin stans breathing on me.

It’s all very annoying as I run Tweetdeck on a work laptop which is now very, well, dicey a proposition given what I’m being sent.

$ASS is short for Australian Safe Shepherd, by the by. It’s a cryptocurrency that, much like Dogecoin, is a joke.

A joke that its own website doesn’t take too seriously. For example, if you navigate to AssFinance, you will find a very detailed look at $ASS’s technical underpinnings, and plans for the future:

I found this hilarious. So I tweeted about it. And then everyone in the $ASS world began to assault my Twitter. Pro-tip: This is not a good way to get taken seriously. But as $ASS is not trying to be taken seriously, does that even matter?

The coin is effectively a limid pump, a cryptocurrency designed to get early adopters to spread the word about it, and then hold. It built its economics around just those goals:

But enough of all that. Why do we give a shit about $ASS? A few reasons:

  • This sort of financial stupidity is funny, but some regular folks are going to get burned.
  • The $ASS pump is indicative of (Read more...)

Workrise, once known as RigUp, raises $300M at a $2.9B valuation



Workrise, which has built a workforce management platform for the skilled trades, announced today that it has raised $300 million in a Series E round led by UK-based Baillie Gifford that values the company at $2.9 billion.

New investor Franklin Templeton joined existing backers including Founders Fund, Bedrock Capital, Andreessen Horowitz (a16z), Moore Strategic Ventures, 137 Ventures and Brookfield Growth Partners in putting money in the round. WIth this latest financing, Workrise has now raised over $750 million.

You may know Austin-based Workrise better as its former name, RigUp. The company changed its name earlier this year to reflect a new emphasis on industries other than just oil and gas after the industry took a beating in recent years.

In 2020, Workrise laid off one-quarter of its corporate employees as the industry took an even bigger hit from the COVID-19 pandemic. It currently has over 600 employees in 25 offices.

Despite the rocky start to the year, Workrise apparently ended up rebounding. Its gross revenue has tripled since 2018, going from just under $300 million to about $900 million to close out 2020.

Workrise was founded in 2014 as a marketplace for on-demand services and skilled labor in the energy industry. In October 2019, it raised a $300 million Series D round led by Andreessen Horowitz(a16z) that valued the company at $1.9 billion.

Since then, Workrise has broadened its reach to include wind, solar, commercial construction and defense industries. In a nutshell, it connects skilled laborers with (Read more...)

Kleiner spots Spot Meetings $5M to modernize walk-and-talks for the Zoom generation



Trees, those deciduous entities you can occasionally see outdoors when not locked down or strapped down at a desktop ruminating on a video call, have long been the inspiration for fresh new ideas. Stories abound of how founders built companies while walking the foothills in Silicon Valley or around parks in San Francisco, and yet, we’ve managed over the past year to take movement mostly out of our remote work lives.

Chicago-based Spot Meetings wants to reinvigorate our meetings — and displace Zoom as the default meeting medium at the same time.

The product and company are just a few months old and remain in closed beta (albeit opening up a bit shortly here), and today it’s announcing $5 million in seed funding led by Ilya Fushman at Kleiner Perkins. That follows a $1.9 million pre-seed round led by Chapter One earlier this year.

CEO and co-founder Greg Caplan said that the team is looking to rebuild the meeting from the ground up for an audio-only environment. “On mobile, it needs to be abundantly simple to be very functional and understood for users so that they can actually use it on the go,” he described. In practice, that requires product development across a wide range of layers.

The product’s most notable feature today is that it has an assistant, aptly named Spot, which listens in on the call and which participants can direct commands to while speaking. For instance, saying “Spot Fetch” will pull the last 40 seconds of conversation, (Read more...)