Day: February 23, 2021

25 Non-Obvious Things I Learned About Diversity, Inclusion and Equity


This post is by n Rohit n from Influential Marketing


It took me three weeks to write this article. Sometimes you just need a little more time listening before speaking.

What I was listening to (and watching), were the 54 conversations we hosted last month as part of our Non-Obvious Beyond Diversity Summit – an event that Chhavi Arya Bhargava and I created (in collaboration with SRC Partners and DICE) where we invited more than 200 authors, instigators and experts to imagine answers for a single question …

What will it take to create a more inclusive world?

Their answers, and the ideas they shared were illuminating. Before I share them, I should tell you that I approached this topic with curiosity and passion. I am not an expert in diversity or inclusion or equity. I do care deeply about it, though, and as an Indian-American living in the US I am professionally and personally affected by this every day.

For me, a more diverse and inclusive world is one where our two boys will see entrepreneurs, TV stars and politicians who look like them. It is one where they learn by example from the world (and from me) the right way to treat a woman, what mansplaining is, why being an ally matters and how a more inclusive world is better for women and for men.

That’s a lot to think about, and the truth is I’m still thinking. But I don’t want to wait to share these insights because I believe they can help many of us (Read more...)

25 Non-Obvious Things I Learned About Diversity, Inclusion and Equity


This post is by n Rohit n from Influential Marketing


It took me three weeks to write this article. Sometimes you just need a little more time listening before speaking.

What I was listening to (and watching), were the 54 conversations we hosted last month as part of our Non-Obvious Beyond Diversity Summit – an event that Chhavi Arya Bhargava and I created (in collaboration with SRC Partners and DICE) where we invited more than 200 authors, instigators and experts to imagine answers for a single question …

What will it take to create a more inclusive world?

Their answers, and the ideas they shared were illuminating. Before I share them, I should tell you that I approached this topic with curiosity and passion. I am not an expert in diversity or inclusion or equity. I do care deeply about it, though, and as an Indian-American living in the US I am professionally and personally affected by this every day.

For me, a more diverse and inclusive world is one where our two boys will see entrepreneurs, TV stars and politicians who look like them. It is one where they learn by example from the world (and from me) the right way to treat a woman, what mansplaining is, why being an ally matters and how a more inclusive world is better for women and for men.

That’s a lot to think about, and the truth is I’m still thinking. But I don’t want to wait to share these insights because I believe they can help many of us (Read more...)

US Venture: Year in Review



US VC Year in Review

2020 will go down as a memorable year for venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, and the limited partners who support the asset class. The beginning of the year was marked by uncertainty and hardship brought on by the pandemic, but VC activity roared back to life in the second half as the world adjusted to working remotely. It will be a few months before audited financials come out, but it is our expectation that many VCs had record years for liquidity and value accretion across their portfolios.

Despite the headwinds largely brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, investor, founder, and customer resiliency pushed the market forward to shatter records, norms, and predictions for the year. US VC fundraising remained strong during the year, breaking a prior record set in 2018 with $74 billion closed during 2020, catapulting the industry into 2021 with $152 billion of dry powder. Overall, investors deployed $156 billion into startups, favoring more developed, later-stage companies, which accounted for 67% of the year’s deal value, and 29% of the total deal count. This vast disparity between late and early-stage deals can be attributed to the increase in mega-deals (financing rounds of $100M+), which reached $71 billion for the year, surpassing the $65 billion record set in 2018. This surge in late-stage investing pushed 71 companies over the $1 billion valuation mark, with 28 companies reaching unicorn status in Q4 alone (PwC/CB Insights). The exit market remained robust throughout the year, buoyed by high-profile Q4 IPOs of Airbnb and DoorDash, (Read more...)

Creating A Sales Presentation: 3 Steps To Win Clients In 2021



sales presentation in-person
Photo by Teemu Paananen on Unsplash

Creating a sales presentation that wins clients can be a challenge in the best of times. But the world has changed drastically over the last year and it’s impacted how we do business.

Sales teams have had to adapt to the new normal of online calls and meetings by learning to give virtual presentations.

But how do you design a winning presentation that wins clients in 2021? We share three steps that will help you create and present a deck that no prospect can turn down.

 

Step 1: Research before creating your presentation

Research is an integral aspect of the sales process. When creating a sales presentation, you need to study the following:

  • Your client;
  • Their specific frustrations; and
  • The people who will be in the presentation room.
 

Research your client

You need to understand what your clients need and convince them you can deliver products or services to help them achieve their goals. The whole point of creating a sales presentation is to give your prospect a personalized experience that sells them the idea of a partnership with your brand. 

So, how can you do that? Start by looking at the size and scope of the company. What is its mission? What are the values of the company’s leaders? Then, study the prospect’s industry. You may have other clients from that niche and you can learn from your experiences with them to reach this customer.

Use that information to map (Read more...)

How Nithya Thadani Is Bringing Voice Technology To Deskless Workers



The Crunchbase “Female Founder Series,” is a series of stories, Q&As, and thought-leadership pieces from glass-ceiling-smashers who overcame the odds and are now leading successful companies.


Nithya Thadani is the CEO of RAIN, an industry leader in voice and conversational AI. After building her career in investment banking and innovation, Thadani moved to voice technology in 2016, and RAIN’s story in voice began. 

Over the past five years, RAIN has built voice-assistant experiences for Fortune 500 companies including Nike, Nestlé, BlackRock, Starbucks, and Wynn Las Vegas. RAIN recently raised a Series A round led by Stanley Ventures, the investment arm of Stanley Black & Decker, to build voice solutions for the workplace.

In this Q&A, we ask Thadani about how she navigated fundraising, her aspirations for voice technology, and what advice she would offer to others on the entrepreneurial journey.

 

Q: Tell us about your background. What led you to enter the voice AI industry?

I’ve been leading RAIN for the past four years. I started my career in investment banking and went on to work in new product innovation before moving to voice technology. Investment banking was a two-year crash course on how businesses operate, while my innovation work was all about uncovering white space opportunities for the future. These collective experiences have helped me a great deal at RAIN as we navigate new territory in voice tech. 

When RAIN started out in voice AI, there were many early indications (Read more...)

How Much Solar Energy is Consumed Per Capita? (1965-2019)


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Visual Capitalist


Press play above to watch how per capita solar energy consumption increases over 54 years.

How Much Solar Energy is Consumed Per Capita?

The long history of solar energy use dates as far back as 4,000 B.C.—when ancient civilizations would use solar architecture to design dwellings that would use more of the sun’s warmth in the winter, while reducing excess heat in the summer.

But despite its long history, we’ve only recently started to rely on solar energy as a renewable power source. This Our World in Data visualization pulls data from BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy to highlight how solar energy consumption per capita has grown in countries around the world over 54 years.

Solar Success: The Top Consumers Per Capita

Solar energy consumption is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh)—and as of the latest estimates, Australia leads the world in terms of highest solar energy consumption per capita at 1,764 kWh in 2019. A combination of factors help achieve this:

  • Optimal weather conditions
  • High gross domestic product (GDP) per capita
  • Tariffs incentivizing the shift to solar

In fact, government subsidies such as financial assistance with installation and feed-in tariffs help bring down the costs of residential solar systems to a mere AUD$1 (US$0.70) per watt.

RankCountrySolar consumption per capita
(kWh, 2019)
Solar’s share of total
(per capita consumption)
#1?? Australia1,7642.50%
#2?? Japan1,4693.59%
#3?? Germany1,4093.22%
#4?? UAE1,0560.77%
#5?? Italy9953.40%
#6?? Greece9363.08%
#7?? Belgium8471.30%
(Read more...)

Suneel Gupta’s “Backable”​ shows how to get others to invest in you and your life


This post is by Reid Hoffman from Reid Hoffman


Attracting investment is such a fundamental part of entrepreneurship that it’s easy to think about it with less nuance than one should. After all, the job of investors is to invest. And their incentive to do so is clear – they’re looking for a big financial return on their investment. So what’s to over-think? If you have a good idea, investors will invest in it. Right?

Not necessarily. In his invaluable new book Backable, tech entrepreneur Suneel Gupta notes that lots of people have good and even great ideas, but the ones who persuade investors to back them “aren’t just brilliant. They’re backable.”

As Suneel explains, being backable isn’t just about lighting up a boardroom with your confidence or charisma. Instead, it’s about conveying your idea with such conviction that others come to share your belief in it too – and also believe you are the person to make that idea a reality.

Suneel, whom I first met when he was making the shift from politics to Silicon Valley, speaks from experience. After product development roles at Mozilla and Groupon, Suneel successfully co-founded Rise Labs, which created the award-winning telehealth app Rise and was ultimately acquired by One Medical.

According to Suneel, though, he wasn’t instinctively backable. Instead, the skills and attributes that ultimately gave him this quality were things he only identified, practiced, and mastered over time. Now, he teaches a course on becoming backable at Harvard. With this new book, he’s created a practical and illuminating guide  (Read more...)

Suneel Gupta’s “Backable”​ shows how to get others to invest in you and your life


This post is by Reid Hoffman from Reid Hoffman


Attracting investment is such a fundamental part of entrepreneurship that it’s easy to think about it with less nuance than one should. After all, the job of investors is to invest. And their incentive to do so is clear – they’re looking for a big financial return on their investment. So what’s to over-think? If you have a good idea, investors will invest in it. Right?

Not necessarily. In his invaluable new book Backable, tech entrepreneur Suneel Gupta notes that lots of people have good and even great ideas, but the ones who persuade investors to back them “aren’t just brilliant. They’re backable.”

As Suneel explains, being backable isn’t just about lighting up a boardroom with your confidence or charisma. Instead, it’s about conveying your idea with such conviction that others come to share your belief in it too – and also believe you are the person to make that idea a reality.

Suneel, whom I first met when he was making the shift from politics to Silicon Valley, speaks from experience. After product development roles at Mozilla and Groupon, Suneel successfully co-founded Rise Labs, which created the award-winning telehealth app Rise and was ultimately acquired by One Medical.

According to Suneel, though, he wasn’t instinctively backable. Instead, the skills and attributes that ultimately gave him this quality were things he only identified, practiced, and mastered over time. Now, he teaches a course on becoming backable at Harvard. With this new book, he’s created a practical and illuminating guide  (Read more...)