Compounding Relationships Make Life Easier


This post is by naval from Naval


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Once you’ve been in a good relationship with somebody for a while, life gets a lot easier because you know that person’s got your back.

Relationships offer a good example of compound interest. Once you’ve been in a good relationship with somebody for a while—whether it’s business or romantic—life gets a lot easier because you know that person’s got your back. You don’t have to keep questioning. 

If I’m doing a deal with someone I’ve worked with for 20 years and there is mutual trust, we don’t have to read the legal contracts. Maybe we don’t even need to create legal contracts; maybe we can do it with a handshake. That kind of trust makes it very easy to do business.

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Free College, Student Debt-Does It Work With Capitalism, Or Not?


This post is by Jeff Carter from Points and Figures


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Thought this podcast was pretty interesting. It’s a great discussion about education.  Not just college education, but also primary and secondary education which leads to a change in demand for a college education.  There is a lot of student debt. Debt can inhibit people from taking a risk. However, in this academic study, they found that student debt wasn’t that toxic and can actually spur homeownership.  I am not sure that debt/risk is 100% positively corellated.

I look at student debt a bit differently.  It’s a subsidy. Subsidies cause prices to go up in the absence of the ability for the supply curve to shift which is the case in education.  Demand for education in the US has risen exponentially in the last 30 years, especially since the fall of the Iron Curtain.  International demand for US colleges is insatiable and inside our country, Continue reading “Free College, Student Debt-Does It Work With Capitalism, Or Not?”

Funding Friday: Medicine Of Time Travel


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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A few weeks ago, I got an email from a reader. She asked if he could subscribe to this blog without the funding friday posts. He thought they were “spammy.” I replied to him “think about them as the ads” and politely told him that wasn’t possible.

I love funding things. And I love sharing the things I fund with all of you.

I saw this project this morning and backed it instantly. A musical art project. Awesome.

The Strategic Question at Seed Today


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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I’ve written before about the Jacob’s Ladder of Fundraising. The Jacob’s Ladder is a children’s toy that flips over, and it’s a great metaphor for the seed market. Seed rounds are rapidly approaching and now often equal to the sizes of Series As just five years ago. The chart above shows the mean round size in the US across.

As the Jacob’s Ladder flips, a series of important strategic questions arise in the market.

For founders, the increase of seed rounds (and the proliferation of seed derivatives like pre/post/second seeds) are a boon. A greater diversity of financial products serve a broader set of founder needs. Wonderful.

It means now there are many more ways to reach $10M in ARR. $1M or $3M or $5M seed. $7M or $12M or $15M or $25M Series A. Mix and match the financial product to the company need at the time. This week Continue reading “The Strategic Question at Seed Today”

The Comfortably Dumb


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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The most recent issue of my weekend newsletter, in which I conveyed my disinterest in engaging with products equipped with surveillance-type technologies, elicited quite a reaction from the readers. I was personally shocked by the number of people who were in agreement with my desire to have devices that eschew the add-ons from big technology companies such as Facebook, Google, and Amazon. Honestly, I was expecting to be tarred and run out of town by people screaming, “Luddite!” 

Instead, the sentiment seems to have struck a chord, especially with many in my generation, which suggests that it is raising a question that should have been asked a long time ago. One long-time reader put it this way: “I’ve been toiling in this industry my entire adult life — what hell hath we wrought?” 

Whether it is a television, a speaker, or a camera, it is hard Continue reading “The Comfortably Dumb”

Raising a Series A Away From Home


This post is by Rob Go from ROBGO.ORG


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Reading Time: 4 minutes

This is a post about raising a Series A from an investor that is not based in your home city.

Let me preface this by saying that if all things were equal, you would probably prefer to have a local series A investor. Proximity helps, and you are more likely to get more time and attention from a series A investor that is in nearby.

But, all things are not equal for many reasons. There may be many fewer series A investors in your home market than elsewhere. The quality, network, or experience of your local investors is likely fairly different from those in other markets. The risk tolerance or expected pricing of investors in your home market may be markedly different from investors in other markets. And finally, the best place to build your business may not also be the place where the most venture

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10x Engineers


This post is by Continuations by Albert Wenger from Continuations by Albert Wenger


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A recent series of tweets about identifying 10x software engineers set off a lot of making fun of the author for perpetuating a myth. Given the wording of the tweets too they made a particularly easy target (I can’t actually find them right now or I would link to them). All that poking fun though obscures some interesting questions about individual and team productivity in software engineering.

Before getting to software though I want to point to a related interesting phenomenon. Just three players: Federer, Nadal and Djokovic have dominated men’s tennis over the last 15 or so years. Between the three of them they have won 53 of the last 64 grand slam tournaments. Each one of them has won roughly 10x as many grand slam tournaments as players in the next best group. There is a similar story on the women’s side. Serena Williams has won 23 grand Continue reading “10x Engineers”

Climate Adaptation?


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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While society debates how to deal with climate change, there are some scientists who are now saying that that time has passed and we now need to start planning society’s adaptation to the climate tragedy we have created on planet earth.

This scientific paper from roughly one year ago is super depressing. I am linking to it because I read it this week and it certainly made me consider how our way of life may change dramatically in my lifetime.

I am not yet ready to throw in the towel on our ability to react to the mounting evidence of a rapidly warming planet and dramatically slow it down with actions like the Paris Accords, recent laws in New York City and New York State, and everyone’s personal actions in what we do and how we do it.

And there is no benefit in getting depressed or defeatist about the

Continue reading “Climate Adaptation?”