AI poses risks, but the White House says regulators shouldn’t “needlessly hamper” innovation

President Donald Trump speaks while touring a computer manufacturing facility that produces Apple computers in Austin, Texas, on November 20, 2019. | Mandel Ngan/Getty Images

So far, artificial intelligence’s development has outpaced regulation. Now regulation has to catch up.

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Artificial intelligence is here, and it’s impacting our lives in real ways — whether it’s the Alexa smart speaker on our nightstand, online customer service chatbots, or the smart replies Google drafts for our emails.

But so far, the tech’s development has outpaced regulation. Now, government agencies are increasingly encountering AI-based tools, and they must figure out how to evaluate them. Take the Food and Drug Administration, which greenlights new medical products: It needs to review and approve new health care products that boast AI-capabilities — like this one that promises to detect eye problems related to diabetes — before they’re sold to us. Or consider the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Continue reading “AI poses risks, but the White House says regulators shouldn’t “needlessly hamper” innovation”