29 deeptech VCs in Europe you need to know – Sifted


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by "Venture Capital" - Google News. The original is [linked here]

29 deeptech VCs in Europe you need to know  Sifted

29 deeptech VCs in Europe you need to know – Sifted


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by "Venture Capital" - Google News. The original is [linked here]

29 deeptech VCs in Europe you need to know  Sifted

Shopify joins Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra Association


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Josh Constine. The original is [linked here]

After eBay, Visa, Stripe, and other high-profile partners ditched the Facebook -backed cryptocurrency collective, Libra scored a win today with the addition of Shopify. The ecommerce platform will become a member of Libra Association, contributing at least $10 million and operating a node that processes transactions for the Facebook-originated stable coin.

If Libra manages to assuage international regulators’ concerns which are currently blocking its roll out, Shopify could gain a way to process transactions without paying credit card fees. Libra is designed to move between wallets with zero or nearly-zero fee. That could save money for Shopify and the 1 million merchants running online shops on its platform.

Shopify stressed that helping merchants reduce fees and bringing commerce opportunities to developing nations as reasons it’s joining the Libra Association . “Much of the world’s financial infrastructure was not built to handle the scale and needs of internet commerce” Shopify writes. Here are the most critical parts of its announcement:

“Our mission is to make commerce better for everyone and to do that, we spend a lot of our time thinking about how to make commerce better in parts of the world where money and banking could be far better . . . As a member of the Libra Association, we will work collectively to build a payment network that makes money easier to access and supports merchants and consumers everywhere . . . Our mission has always been to support the entrepreneurial journey of the more than one million merchants on our platform. That means advocating for Continue reading “Shopify joins Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra Association”

Progress, Postmodernism and the Tech Backlash


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Alex Danco. The original is [linked here]

Here are two aspects of the anti-tech backlash that I believe are both true, and are actually reciprocally related to each other: Critics in media, politics, and even in tech… Read more Progress, Postmodernism and the Tech Backlash

Another New Stock Exchange


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Jeff Carter. The original is [linked here]

Hey, support and share this.  It’s pretty cool. 

I’d like you to participate with me in an effort I am leading.  I am raising money to dedicate a hotel suite to the Unknown Soldier at the new National World War Two Museum hotel.  Any proceeds over and above dedicating that space will go to Museum STEM projects dedicated to helping grade school children across the United States learn STEM.

Yesterday you might have seen the news that there is a new competitor to the NYSE and NASDAQ called the Members Exchange.  I am all about competition.  However, one needs to understand there is a large difference between the SEC regulated side of the market and the CFTC regulated side.  The difference in regulation creates different incentives and structures.

The reason they are starting Members Exchange is data fees.  As markets have gotten faster trading in microseconds, data has become a valuable commodity.  Exchanges have raised prices for it.  Meanwhile, commissions to retail investors are free.  In order to understand why they can charge so much for data, you have to understand some other things about the business.  In my opinion, exchanges are not a utility.  From the looks of the Members Exchange, the founders want to run an entire exchange as a utility.

The biggest difference is in how trades are cleared.  On the CFTC side, exchanges own their own captive clearing.  It becomes a Continue reading “Another New Stock Exchange”

13 Metrics for Marketplace Companies


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by jeffjordana16z. The original is [linked here]

This week, we published the a16z Marketplace 100, a ranking of the largest and fastest-growing consumer-facing marketplace startups and private companies. See the full index and analysis here, and visit a16z.com/marketplace-100 for more marketplace-related content.

Every company tracks …

The post 13 Metrics for Marketplace Companies appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

Is There Much Opportunity for Start-ups in Cross-border Payments?


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Russell Taylor. The original is [linked here]

Sparked by my frustrations with trying to pay my friends abroad, this is a brief thought piece on the future of international payments —…

Continue reading on The Startup »

Why VCs Love SaaS Businesses


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Daniel Li. The original is [linked here]

A couple weeks ago, I shared a chart with the stock performance of recent tech IPOs along with this tweet:

there are two dominant startup models in tech today. (1) You can make money selling software. (2) You can lose money selling anything else.

Lots of people wrote back, and one person pointed out that a better metric to look at (than stock price) would be revenue vs. capital raised. He also pointed me to this fantastic TechCrunch article with the data, so here is a closer look at the efficiency of different businesses models, thanks to Boris!

This chart shows that most public SaaS companies need less than $1 of capital to acquire $1 of ARR. For example, Smartsheet (hidden behind PagerDuty) burned $55M of cash prior to IPO and grew to ~$130M of ARR, so it only cost ~$0.40 for Smartsheet to acquire $1 of ARR.

On the chart, companies “below the line” like Domo have had a harder time finding efficient growth, while Zoom (far left, middle of the way up) was actually able to grow to $423M of ARR with negative cash burn (i.e., they had more cash at time of IPO than they raised). Pretty incredible!

So SaaS companies build their businesses quite efficiently… Now here’s what it looks like when you add other recent (non-software) IPOs to the plot (note: instead of ARR, I used last twelve month revenue).

With the exception of WeWork, all of these companies are actually quite close Continue reading “Why VCs Love SaaS Businesses”

When do Agile practices make little sense?


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Fabien Dussaucy. The original is [linked here]

A few months ago, I presented Agile methodologies to financial auditors. The objective was to demonstrate why agile is relevant to their activities and to push them to rethink their work with agile principles in mind.
It was much more difficult than expected.

As always when giving this presentation, the first step was to highlight the recurring problems within traditional project management: tunnel effect, delays, cost slippage… However this time, I was surprised to discover that “project” didn’t have the same meaning in the audit sector. Most of the time, auditors follow pre-designed and optimized processes to deliver standardized documents at a fixed date with no or very little admissible delays.

In industries or IT departments, a project consist usually in building something new for a customer (internal or external), where the exact shape and content of the delivered item can never be fully specified and stable throughout the project duration. The scope of a project is regularly updated due to changes in customer needs/priorities, or to hidden complexities discovered by the project team.

Therefore, my “bad project management” statements didn’t echo with their own experience: I was on the wrong track with the “start with why” approach. Obviously, the rest of the Agile awareness session wasn’t fluid and at the end, the auditors were not convinced by the benefits of Agile practices.

During the “post mortem” of this presentation, we realized that we had not formalized under which circumstance agile is relevant and in which cases it is not.

After a Continue reading “When do Agile practices make little sense?”

FaceTime with tech’s dual reality


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Archimedes Accelerator LLC / ADV's Venture Trends Board. The original is [linked here]

Whenever I am anxious, I have trouble sleeping. I find myself tossing, turning, and waking up in the middle of the night just to sit and stare into the dark. Over the holidays, I had one of those phases again. I felt nervous and worried — specifically, about my parents, who live in Delhi. 

My father, who is almost 80 years old, was in the hospital. He suffered heart failure and had pneumonia. My brother had flown to Delhi and was with him, taking care of all the stuff. But I was stuck in San Francisco, anxious, restless, and overcome with the negativity that any immigrant feels when they are far away from aging parents.  

My entire family was using WhatsApp to coordinate everything. My mother loves WhatsApp phone calls, so she had been burning up the fiber cables with my sister. My brother knows me well, so he would call me early in the morning. We both have iPhones, so it was a FaceTime call — and even over a shitty 4G network, the audio was crisp and clear. He would give me an update and then switch on the video, turn the phone around and just like that my father and I were face to face. Even thousands of miles apart, I could see what he looked like. I could sense his surroundings and his state of mind. Though we only talked for a few minutes before the connection waned, I felt better. My mind was Continue reading “FaceTime with tech’s dual reality”

Four Paths to Marketplace Success


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Lauren Murrow. The original is [linked here]

This week, we published the a16z Marketplace 100, a ranking of the largest and fastest-growing consumer-facing marketplace startups and private companies. See the full index and analysis here, and visit a16z.com/marketplace-100 for more marketplace-related content.

When building a

The post Four Paths to Marketplace Success appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.

These Are Countries Where Startup Funding Is Really Taking Off


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Joanna Glasner. The original is [linked here]

In tech circles, it feels like Silicon Valley has been around forever. But in reality, the region’s first big venture-backed tech companies launched barely over 50 years ago.

Subscribe to the Crunchbase Daily

Other global hubs, including Seattle, Bangalore and Beijing, have even shorter track records for startup funding. And tech hotspots like Austin and Sao Paolo, have really taken off only in the past few years.

So which places are set to be the next growth centers of startup action? For this latest Crunchbase slideshow, we perused our country-by-country funding data to pinpoint which nations are seeing the biggest jumps in funding activity.

Click through to see which countries saw the biggest year-over-year investment gains. The tabulations also include a look at deal counts, top cities for startups and notable rounds.*

*For this dataset, we did not include seed financings, focusing only on venture rounds of Series A and beyond. 

Flag illustrations: Dom Guzman

The post These Are Countries Where Startup Funding Is Really Taking Off appeared first on Crunchbase News.

Every Leader Needs to Navigate These 7 Tensions


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Jennifer Jordan. The original is [linked here]

Are you an expert or a learner? A tactician or a visionary?

The Anatomy of the Ultimate 1-Minute Pitch


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Donna Griffit. The original is [linked here]

The Anatomy of the Ultimate 1-Minute Pitch

Pitch quick or lose your audience

When you only have a minute, what do you say?

Before you create a full-blown deck, you need to know how to “QuickPitch.” Being able to tell your story in a minute or less in a way that captivates the audience and makes them want to continue is an art form. It’s a daunting task, but you need to be able to explain your idea clearly to potential investors, users, partners, or even friends and family.

Last week, I worked with a group of 66 very bright young global entrepreneurs at Draper University, and I saw first hand how many opportunities are lost with the “intro pitch.” They were each asked to introduce themselves in one minute. Over and over we heard unclear babble about their idea and how it would work. Some got ambitious and tried to insert an entire investor pitch into one minute — that didn’t work. There were a few standouts, but most of the 30 we heard on day one were simply unclear and lackluster.

What was missing? Engaging the audience in that minute. If they aren’t feeling compelled, excited, or moved in some way, you will be forgotten. When given a minute to pitch, most people are so driven by the time that they either talk really fast and squeeze in too much, or they say one line and only use a fraction of their time. Either way, Continue reading “The Anatomy of the Ultimate 1-Minute Pitch”

What we can learn from Uber’s first pitch deck: 5 tips for startups looking for funding


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Bethany | Snap Out. The original is [linked here]

In 2020, it’s pretty hard to imagine a world without Uber for a lot of us. Go to any large city, almost anywhere in the world, and the convenience of Uber above taxis and public transport reigns supreme.

However, rewind 12 years and Uber, then “UberCab”, were creating their first ever pitch deck. From it came a $200k total investment, which helped the company to grow into what it is today: A market dominator with an annual turnover of $11.3 billion in 2018 (source).

Impressive, right?

Knowing that Uber not only secured funding from the pitch deck, which they released to the public for their 9th anniversary, but also that they then used this funding to become such a success story, tells us that businesses have a lot to learn from them!

At Snap Out, we’re grant funding geeks! We help businesses to secure funding, with years of experience under our belt. So, we knew that we had to write this blog post, diving into Uber’s original pitch deck and outlining what it can teach businesses hoping for similar success.

5 key lessons from Uber’s first pitch deck

1. Keep it concise

We know, you love your business idea and want to share it with the world. However, don’t be tempted into putting lots of unnecessary detail into your pitch deck and sharing all of the information you have.

When you’re giving a pitch, you need to keep the people you’re selling to as engaged as possible. If they lose interest, you’re Continue reading “What we can learn from Uber’s first pitch deck: 5 tips for startups looking for funding”

I Know Everybody Told You to Send Your Fund-Raising Decks as a Link.


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Mark Suster. The original is [linked here]

I Know Everybody Told You to Send Your Fund-Raising Decks as a Link. Here’s Why You Should Just Send the Deck

I know you have your document sending tool to send your fund-raising deck to VCs and track who read your deck, which pages they read and how much time they spend on each page. I know that you can use an email system with this to track my open rate, whether I forwarded the email, the IP address where I read it, whether I was on a mobile device or a wired computer and you can tell who else read the document. I know all of this because every VC knows this because we’ve all either funded companies that have marketing technology or we’ve seen a pitch with a company that does this.

So while it might seem obvious that you should send it via a link, I’d like to make the counter-argument that it is not an obvious choice. I’ll explain why in this post. First, it’s not the end of the world if you do send links and I feel confident many people will disagree with me but let me at least make the case.

[If you haven’t read the other VC fund-raising posts I’ve done as part of this series you can find the whole outline and this first in the series here.]

Your pitch deck should really be your best marketing tool

Your pitch deck shouldn’t contain your deepest, darkest secrets and plans. That Continue reading “I Know Everybody Told You to Send Your Fund-Raising Decks as a Link.”

“Controversial, I know. But a reminder on why sending your deck is always better than trying to get analytics by sending a link to an online version with tracking https://t.co/1OigtIYXlX”


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Archimedes Accelerator LLC / ADV's Venture Trends Board. The original is [linked here]

European startups are obsessed with profits – Sifted


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by "Venture Capital" - Google News. The original is [linked here]

European startups are obsessed with profits  Sifted

Startups Bring Micro Investing To Real Estate


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Jenna D'Illard. The original is [linked here]

From house flipping television shows to the Zillow app on cellphones, home buying has become a part of our culture, but for many real estate investing is still out of reach.

But since the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 relaxed regulations on direct-to-consumer security sales, a new trend called micro-investing has added a new wave of investors to the real estate market. Micro-investing allows consumers to buy shares of properties and customize portfolios, for as little as $5.

“The best portfolios are diversified, and real estate performs very uniquely, in a way that is uncorrelated to the stock market and bonds… We want to offer the same asset class at a lower price point,” said Janine Yorio, founder and chief executive officer of a New York City-based real estate micro-investment app called Compound, which flips properties at a profit for investors.

The model is similar to the traditional real estate investment trust (REIT), but micro-investing companies give investors the ability to become part owners of specific properties — which creates lower fee structures, favorable tax benefits and assets that are not tied to the stock market.

“REITs are just like owning stock, subject to stock market volatility and other unrelated factors to the actual performance of a property. So in addition to REITs, savvy individual investors add private real estate to their portfolios for greater diversification and returns,” said Darren Powderly, co-founder of CrowdStreet, Inc., a Portland, Ore.-based micro-investing firm that allows investors to Continue reading “Startups Bring Micro Investing To Real Estate”

Required Reading for Marketplace Entrepreneurs


This post is curated by Keith Teare. It was written by Lauren Murrow. The original is [linked here]

This week, we published the a16z Marketplace 100, a ranking of the largest and fastest-growing consumer-facing marketplace startups and private companies. See the full index and analysis here, and visit a16z.com/marketplace-100 for more marketplace-related content.

From academics to

The post Required Reading for Marketplace Entrepreneurs appeared first on Andreessen Horowitz.